Irish Gardeners Forum Home
 FAQFAQ   MemberlistMemberlist   UsergroupsUsergroups   RegisterRegister 
 ProfileProfile   Log in to check your private messagesLog in to check your private messages   Log inLog in 
Custom Search
   
Weather Report /
Moon Phase for Ireland

Post new topic   Reply to topic    Irish Gardeners Forum Home -> Organic gardening in Ireland / Alternative and Sustainable Gardening practices

rainwater harvesting


Goto page Previous  1, 2, 3  Next  
Most Recent Posts Gravel Drive towed rake??
Last post: kindredspirit
the first of 2020
Last post: ponddigger
If I knew what this is, I could google how to look after it!
Last post: Greengage
Whitewash for the fruit trees, any chance to get it in IRL?
Last post: kindredspirit
 
Visit TheGardenShop.ie
Author Message
walltoall
Rank attained: Orchard owner


Joined: 25 Aug 2008
Posts: 706
Location: Thurrock RM15 via Dungarvan and the Banner County

PostPosted: Fri Jan 07, 2011 8:51 pm    Post subject: recycling rainwater Reply with quote

Meanwhile back on topic, here in England we get charged for water coming IN to the house and we get charged again for 90% of the same water going OUT again but at a higher rate. I just paid £72 last week for the IN charge and in front of me I have the OUT bill for £83.53 to pay on Monday. Thats £155 twice a year. In spite of serious control of water use in the house (and the actual quantity going down annually) the cost keeps rising anyway.

Way down deep in the small print of English water charges it says if you can show you are recycling roof -water (and I think it might also apply to grey water too), you can get a partial rebate off the OUT charge. Downpipes in new builds here go straight to ground. Right now (jan13/2011) or as soon as its warm enough to work outside again, I'll be linking all three downpipes to one water butt. That butt has been in and working almost a year now off one chute. It has a boat bilge pump to hoist the contents right up to the roof cistern, where of course it does not freeze.

The system is working semi-automatic at the mo but eventually it'll be totally automatic when I adapt the roof cistern overflow system to fall into a garden tank exactly the same as PONDdigger has.

At the moment I activate the bilge pump via an isolator switch, transferring water to the roof when I want/need to, but in time it will use it's float switch only. I've daisy-chained a 2nd cistern in the roof to take an extra 60gals as a temporary solution. There is a stop valve between the tanks so that's presently on manual control also.

Bottom line is that from the end of next month I expect to have it fully working reducing my IN water substantially AND softening the house water (which here in Essex is as hard as anywhere in Ireland). The whole system is quite complex at first glance but anyone who has actually SEEN it has been impressed by the simplicity of operation.

Before ye all start asking for pictures that's not how I work. But the groundwork will eventually be on my website. And my website is on my profile before you ask.

_________________
Retired trouble-maker. twitters @walltoall and dreams of being promoted to Pedunculate Oaker.


Last edited by walltoall on Mon Aug 08, 2011 9:49 am; edited 4 times in total
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
sequoiamike
Rank attained: Hazel Tree
Rank attained: Hazel Tree


Joined: 22 Sep 2009
Posts: 19
Location: Cloyne, Co. Cork

PostPosted: Thu Jan 13, 2011 11:18 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

We have an above-ground 300-gallon barrel made from recycled plastic and the water inside did not freeze during this past episode. (the spigot did, but that was easy enough to take care of with some boiling water). Ours is fully sealed with a simple mesh filter that can be removed for cleaning now and then. It's not insulated, but I have seen them double-walled with a filler insulation for colder climes.

It only collects rainwater from the roof. And the benefit of being above ground is that there is no need for a pump - just gravity fed. We use it for clothes washing and in the garden. (the washing machine is just on the other side of wall, so hose only has to travel 2m). It is amazing how much "cleaner" our clothes seem without the heavy lime and whatever else is in the mains water. And no limescale deposits in our washing machine. Highly recommended!
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
ponddigger
Rank attained: Orchard owner


Joined: 31 Jan 2010
Posts: 732
Location: co tipp

PostPosted: Thu Jan 13, 2011 1:13 pm    Post subject: rainwater harvesting Reply with quote

hi sequoiamike ,could you post a few photos of your system. yours ponddigger Idea
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
walltoall
Rank attained: Orchard owner


Joined: 25 Aug 2008
Posts: 706
Location: Thurrock RM15 via Dungarvan and the Banner County

PostPosted: Thu Jan 13, 2011 1:16 pm    Post subject: harvesting rainwater Reply with quote

Have we any biology buffs on that can tell me how to ensure that harvested water is not subjected to stagnation problems growth of algae and proliferation of insects? Sometimes in Summer I get little wiggly swimmers in the butt?
_________________
Retired trouble-maker. twitters @walltoall and dreams of being promoted to Pedunculate Oaker.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
Sb
Rank attained: Silver Birch Tree
Rank attained: Silver Birch Tree


Joined: 09 Jun 2006
Posts: 184
Location: east coast

PostPosted: Thu Jan 13, 2011 2:27 pm    Post subject: Re: harvesting rainwater Reply with quote

walltoall wrote:
I get little wiggly swimmers in the butt?


Sounds painful. Laughing But seriously I would think the swimmers are a possibillity with algae less so if light is omitted.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
kindredspirit
Rank attained: Chlorophyll for blood


Joined: 10 Nov 2008
Posts: 2288
Location: Mid-west.

PostPosted: Thu Jan 13, 2011 5:28 pm    Post subject: Re: harvesting rainwater Reply with quote

walltoall wrote:
Have we any biology buffs on that can tell me how to ensure that harvested water is not subjected to stagnation problems growth of algae and proliferation of insects? Sometimes in Summer I get little wiggly swimmers in the butt?


Whop some Chlorosan in. (Ooops! Only a teaspoonful ! )

That'll get rid of the little red squiggly mosquito larvae and the green algae!

_________________
.
.
.
.
A little garden in Co. Limerick.Some non-gardening photographs.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
ponddigger
Rank attained: Orchard owner


Joined: 31 Jan 2010
Posts: 732
Location: co tipp

PostPosted: Thu Jan 13, 2011 5:35 pm    Post subject: rainwater harvesting Reply with quote

hi.my diy rainwater harvesting system has a pondless water fall that circulate the water from the tank in the ground,so the waterdoes not become stagnant.yours ponddigger


001.JPG
 Description:
pondless waterfall flowing into the under ground tank
 Filesize:  150.19 KB
 Viewed:  25381 Time(s)

001.JPG


Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
walltoall
Rank attained: Orchard owner


Joined: 25 Aug 2008
Posts: 706
Location: Thurrock RM15 via Dungarvan and the Banner County

PostPosted: Thu Jan 13, 2011 9:31 pm    Post subject: harvesting rainwater Reply with quote

Hello pondigger
Thanks for the comment. So are you saying that if the water is aerated regularly it will stay fresh and clean? I've dealt with 300 gallon water tanks on large sailing boats, where the water has to stay drinkable for months at a time. We used to put tablets containing Ag salts in the system every week. I notice you have a lot of space. Do you farm?

Hello Kindred
Not so sure about Chlorosan but if that's what it takes! I experimented last year with bleach. I can keep light out ok, but the butt/barrel is in the open and three feet off the ground and i can't change that. The squigglies are not red, they're black (and yes I can already see Sb working on that) but you're saying they will be the larvae of an insect which uses stagnant water as part of its life cycle? I can make it very interesting for them lads then in 2011.

Sb.
Oh shht I left myself open to that one. I'd forgotten that in England a butt is a barrell and in America it's one's posterior. Ireland is halfway between the two and I'm a paddy abroad in Essex. All the high numbers good buddy.

_________________
Retired trouble-maker. twitters @walltoall and dreams of being promoted to Pedunculate Oaker.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
ponddigger
Rank attained: Orchard owner


Joined: 31 Jan 2010
Posts: 732
Location: co tipp

PostPosted: Thu Jan 13, 2011 11:05 pm    Post subject: harvesting rain Reply with quote

hi walltoall.my system is a diy system , dont use it fof drinking,used for watering the garden.washing cars and pickup.when mains is cut off use it for toilets ect, no i dont own a farm,love to. yours ponddigger Very Happy Twisted Evil
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
kindredspirit
Rank attained: Chlorophyll for blood


Joined: 10 Nov 2008
Posts: 2288
Location: Mid-west.

PostPosted: Fri Jan 14, 2011 6:42 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

If you don't want to use Chlorosan, then a fine mesh filter and UV light will clean your water.
One 25 watt UV bulb will cover a 2" pipe. (You have to change the UV bulb every year though as it looses its effectiveness over time.)
Don't know what the black sqigglies are, though. Perhaps a new Wall to All species? Smile
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
walltoall
Rank attained: Orchard owner


Joined: 25 Aug 2008
Posts: 706
Location: Thurrock RM15 via Dungarvan and the Banner County

PostPosted: Fri Jan 14, 2011 6:58 am    Post subject: cleaning harvested rainwater Reply with quote

Thanks for that K I looked up Chlorosan and maybe the spray bottle might deliver the goods in relative safety. The harvested rainwater could end up in a warm bath and just because I'm not paranoid does not mean they ain't out to get me. lol. The wigglies don't get in the pump as it picks up from the bottom and they squiggle near the top. (I think?).
_________________
Retired trouble-maker. twitters @walltoall and dreams of being promoted to Pedunculate Oaker.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
cooler
Rank attained: Sessile Oak Tree
Rank attained: Sessile Oak Tree


Joined: 15 Jun 2006
Posts: 292

PostPosted: Fri Jan 14, 2011 1:35 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

kindredspirit wrote:

Don't know what the black sqigglies are, though. Perhaps a new Wall to All species?


Are they not just leather jackets the larvae of the Daddy long legs?

_________________
'Unemployment is capitalisms way of getting you to plant a garden'.
Orson Scott Card
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
walltoall
Rank attained: Orchard owner


Joined: 25 Aug 2008
Posts: 706
Location: Thurrock RM15 via Dungarvan and the Banner County

PostPosted: Fri Jan 14, 2011 3:47 pm    Post subject: harvesting clean rainwater Reply with quote

No the leatherjacket is an old adversary. He's like an elongated and narrowed raisin and develops under the surface of tilled fields. The wigglies in the barrel won't bother me K I am just interested in having a solution before the problem arises and your suggested Chlorosan is one workable option. Thanks.
_________________
Retired trouble-maker. twitters @walltoall and dreams of being promoted to Pedunculate Oaker.


Last edited by walltoall on Mon Aug 08, 2011 9:56 am; edited 1 time in total
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
kindredspirit
Rank attained: Chlorophyll for blood


Joined: 10 Nov 2008
Posts: 2288
Location: Mid-west.

PostPosted: Fri Jan 14, 2011 7:15 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Watch your fingers! Those larvae could be dangerous.

See this video.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RD5wsoycsqI&feature=related

Laughing Laughing Laughing Laughing Laughing

_________________
.
.
.
.
A little garden in Co. Limerick.Some non-gardening photographs.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
Letterkenny Gardener
Rank attained: Hazel Tree
Rank attained: Hazel Tree


Joined: 01 Aug 2011
Posts: 5

PostPosted: Thu Aug 04, 2011 8:19 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hi,
I'm new to the site and am just about to build a new house with a rainwater system. I haven't decided on exact details yet but have heard a very cost effective way is to get some well liners and usr those as the tank. Any ideas ?
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Display posts from previous:   
Post new topic   Reply to topic    Irish Gardeners Forum Home -> Organic gardening in Ireland / Alternative and Sustainable Gardening practices All times are GMT
Goto page Previous  1, 2, 3  Next
Page 2 of 3

 

Jump to:  
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum
You can attach files in this forum
You can download files in this forum


Powered by phpBB © 2001, 2005 phpBB Group

Privacy Policy | Copyright © 2006 - present IrishGardeners.com (part of GardenPlansIreland.com)