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The 5 Fundamental Rules Of Crop Rotation in your Veg Garden


 
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James Kilkelly
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Joined: 30 May 2006
Posts: 2142
Location: West of Ireland

PostPosted: Sat Sep 30, 2006 9:09 pm    Post subject: The 5 Fundamental Rules Of Crop Rotation in your Veg Garden Reply with quote

The 5 Fundamental Rules Of Crop Rotation in your Veg Garden

There is a very important skill to be employed in making each vegetable do its best, and that is crop rotation, or the following of any vegetable with a different sort at the next planting...

With some vegetables, such as cabbage, this is almost imperative, and practically all are helped by it.

Even onions, which are popularly supposed to be the proving exception to the rule, are healthier, and do as well after some other crop, "provided" the soil is as finely pulverized and rich as a previous crop of onions would leave it.

If the same vegetables are grown in the same place year after year, there is a risk that soil borne pests and diseases will become a problem, and that plant health can decline as a result of this.

The best way to avoid this problem is to move your crops around the growing area. This ancient practice, known as rotation, is still being used today and not only helps to benefit your plants and vegetables, but your soil is helped by this also...



Here are the 5 fundamental rules of crop rotation:

(1) Crops of the same vegetable, or vegetables of the same family (such as turnips and cabbage) should not follow each other.

(2) Vegetables that feed near the surface, like corn, should follow deep-rooting crops.

(3) Vines or leaf crops should follow root crops.

(4) Quick-growing crops should follow those occupying the land all season.

(5) Keep records of what actually happened, and then make use of this information when planning next year's crop.

These are the principles which should determine the rotations to be followed in individual cases. The proper way to attend to this matter is when making your veg garden plans or planting plan. You will then have time to do it properly, and will need to give it no further thought for a year.

With the above suggestions in mind, and put to use, it will not be difficult to give your crops special attention when needed to make them do their very best...

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daigo75
Rank attained: Hawthorn Tree
Rank attained: Hawthorn Tree


Joined: 23 Feb 2009
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PostPosted: Wed May 27, 2009 10:20 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks for the info, very useful, even if you posted them 3 years ago. I just have one question, though. Due to lack of space, I dug three beds in the soil. In each, I planted more than one vegetable type:
1- Lettuce, radish, onions and cabbages. Garlic in the perimeter, just because it was sprouting and I didn't want to waste it.
2- Lettuce, rocket, peas, spinach, sweetcorn (and one pumpkin seed in a lonely corner).
3- Peppers, cucumbers, watermelon (long shot, I know Wink) onions and beans.

So far everything is growing fairly well, and I marked each area to keep track of what I planted. Would a rotation be beneficial anyway (on each small area), or should I fill each bed with a single plant type next year?

By the way, I'm also growing tomatoes in pots, so I can move them easily. Are they supposed to survive in winter? If not, can I recycle the compost I have in the pots and put it in the beds?

Thank you very much.
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