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Seaweed


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Redfox
Rank attained: Hazel Tree
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Joined: 04 Jan 2010
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Location: Dublin

PostPosted: Tue Jan 05, 2010 11:15 am    Post subject: Seaweed Reply with quote

I was wondering what to do with seaweed. I read to collect it and leave it out in the rain to get washed or wash it with rainwater and then use it as a mulch around plants. Anybody tried seaweed mulch and is it worth the effort? Where would be a good spot to collect it in south Dublin and when is the season? Its quite rough out there at the moment. I nearly got blown over walking along the beach in Newcastle last weekend.
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walltoall
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Joined: 25 Aug 2008
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Location: Thurrock RM15 via Dungarvan and the Banner County

PostPosted: Tue Jan 05, 2010 8:10 pm    Post subject: gathering wore on the seashore Reply with quote

Redfox,
Seaweed collected at the high tide mark can be used as a mulch or dug in or added to your compost anytime you can get a supply. You don't need it out in the rain that's an old wive's tale. For some reason seaweed does not carry salt with it. and it will not 'pollute' the garden.

Best time of year in and around Dublin is when spring tides concur with or come soon after easterly gales. \each month around Dublin there is a high tide about 7pm and it is the highest of the month. I have a very comprehensive article buried deep in this site on the subject and if I can locate it, I'll publish or pm the location. There's a guy called "VERGE" on here who sometimes does these searches and he may be lurking in the shrubbery as we speak. If not I'll be back to you
SW

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Last edited by walltoall on Fri Jan 22, 2010 10:25 pm; edited 1 time in total
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Redfox
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PostPosted: Tue Jan 05, 2010 8:16 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks a lot. I want to make use of as much 'free' material as possible. I got a compost heap, but there isn't much to put on at the moment except some kitchen waste. I will chop up my Christmas tree and compost it as well... I read somewhere that using pine needles around a strawberry bed will flavour the strawberry's to taste like wild ones. Have you tried this?
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walltoall
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Location: Thurrock RM15 via Dungarvan and the Banner County

PostPosted: Tue Jan 05, 2010 8:37 pm    Post subject: acidifying the strawbs Reply with quote

No I've not heard that trick but I'm willing to believe it. Pine needles are acidic and it's possible that in acidifying the ground you change the eventual taste. Funny though, wild strawbs grow best on a bank in very well drained soil. In fact they can be killed by kindness. Go for it Redfox. I'm rooting for you.
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ormondsview
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PostPosted: Wed Jan 06, 2010 11:34 am    Post subject: seaweed from dry Reply with quote

If you don't live close to the sea and want to put minerals on your plants, you can use the dry packages from Oriental or health food markets to put on your plants. Water it down and make some tea, put it into the spray bottle and fertilize the leaves.http://twharton.com/gardeninginmississauga/wp-content/uploads/2010/01/sw2.jpg google it.

* It aids in seed germination, assists in nutrient uptake, helps plants resists insects, disease and frosts
* it aids in root development, conditions soil and acts as a fertilizer.
* studies have shown that adding seaweed to livestock feed improves fertility rates, aids in gestation and birthing and reduces lameness.
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nemo
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PostPosted: Fri Jan 22, 2010 8:48 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

seaweed
i have been transforming a wet wild area of our gaden the last uncultivated area it is covered with rushes so i got a local man to turn the soil upside down with his digger which left me with clean soil to work with.i have been using seaweed for years and i think the crops i get are as a result of using seaweed.with the bare soil i made up ridges(lazy beds) and covered them in well rotted manure and this was in turn covered with a good layer of seaweed.the seaweed will prevent nuitrents and soil being washed away by rain.it also prevents weeds from growing in the new beds because a thick layer of seaweed prevents light from reaching the soil.in my brassica patch i use seaweed to mulch around the plants as the seaweed rotts it will give off boron this helps to produce good heads of cabbage kale calabrese and brocoli .
but its the rubarb patch and fruit bushes that seaweed make growing these crops very easy the rhubarb crowns are surrounded with seaweed all year round our soft fruit bushes get the same treatment.by using seaweed this prevents me from weeding and feeding both crops the seaweed does it all prevernts weeds and feds the plants.in our polly tunnel all bare soil is covered with seaweed i admit the smell can be strong at times but its a natural smell.over the years i have found making compost using seaweed and news paper is quick and easy they both rot down fast.we make liquid feed with seaweed.this year as an experiment i soaked seeds in a seaweed solition before sowing and i have found out when i pre soak seeds in seaweed solution i get a better germination rate.by now you have found out that i am passionate about seaweed.I NEVER HARVEST SEAWEED FROM ROCKS ETC,I ONLY COLLECT SEAWEED THAT GETS WASHED UP ON THE SHORE WITH OUR LITTLE TRACTOR THE STORMS USALLY SUPPLY PLENTY SEAWEED FOR OUR GARDEN. so go on and give it a go and see the many benifets for your self.you can also buy seaweed meal and seaweed dust and liquid feed from companys like fruit hill farm in bantry(www.fruithillfarm.com and http://www.arramara.ie
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walltoall
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PostPosted: Fri Jan 22, 2010 10:23 pm    Post subject: seeweed? pull it! seaweed? spread it! Reply with quote

Nemo,
You are totally on my frequency and I agree totally with every word, right down to taking the seaweed off the strand. You need seaweed that has been 'pulled' and if its a bit dried and a bit sandy all the better. I'm delighted with your results on all fronts. There is no downside to the use of seaweed in coastal gardens.
SW

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nemo
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PostPosted: Sat Jan 23, 2010 7:18 pm    Post subject: seaweed Reply with quote

in the summer time i dry some seaweed by leaving it on a dry surface and spread it out with space all around it .single layers work out faster to dry the sun does the work to dry the seaweed then i put in an old coal bag and just walk on it a few times to make seaweed meal and store it in an old potato bag ( Hessian sack )
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brennan.jm
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PostPosted: Sat Jan 23, 2010 9:34 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

if you don't live near the sea where could one get a good supply of seaweed to supress weeds. at present i have about eighty sq meters of raised beds i have'nt used chemical sprays of any sort for over two years. however i would be delighted to get an organic control to block out light to prevent weeds. is there any danger of seaweed becoming a commercial crop and therefore causing trouble for the envoirment
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paul5000
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PostPosted: Sat Jan 23, 2010 10:32 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Well rotted seaweed makes a great additive to your veg patch, if ye can at all get a good amount of it. A mate of mine supplied me with about 3/4 of a tonne of Kerry coast seaweed this time last year. The veg loved it.
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nemo
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PostPosted: Mon Jan 25, 2010 8:08 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

IF WE KEEP THE BENEFITS OF SEAWEED TO OURSELF S IT MIGHT NEVER BECOME A COMMERCIALCROP EXCEPT TO MAKE MOISTURISER TO KEEP OUR HANDS NICE AND SOFT
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brennan.jm
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PostPosted: Mon Jan 25, 2010 9:35 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

paul any chance of sourceing a couple of ton of seaweed from your mate i live in the midlands as well
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paul5000
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PostPosted: Tue Jan 26, 2010 10:05 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Doesn't have any this year, but was thinking of heading to the coast with large bags and collect some myself, with a large van if i can borrow one. Have to check with him on when you can harvest it. I think you can't take it from the sea. only from beach or rocks.
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brennan.jm
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PostPosted: Tue Jan 26, 2010 1:23 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Paul perhaps you could let me know if you find a way to get a reasonable quantity
i hope to be able to garden without any chemicals so i am always on the lookout for ways to keep weeds down and also to create organic compost

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paul5000
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PostPosted: Tue Jan 26, 2010 11:59 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Will do.
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