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Can these butchered trees survive ?


 
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Western
Rank attained: Hazel Tree
Rank attained: Hazel Tree


Joined: 17 Oct 2008
Posts: 13
Location: West of Ireland

PostPosted: Wed Nov 25, 2009 4:25 pm    Post subject: Can these butchered trees survive ? Reply with quote

Mod : I apologise that this post has nothing to do with gardening, but as there are experts on this site, yourself included, I thought I'd ask for opinions anyway.

I was walking in a remote part of Mayo which has a small but rare mixed oak / ash / scots pine and other tree species seaside wooded area, when I was appalled to see that a large machine had badly damaged many of the superb trees there and completely pulled up others. Can these trees survive this serious damage and, if so, what should be done to give them a chance ?



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dinahdabble
Rank attained: Rowan Tree
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Joined: 24 Mar 2009
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PostPosted: Wed Nov 25, 2009 11:33 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I am not an expert, but my dad worked with trees, and this is what I would find out about and try to do to maximise their chances. I am posting this in good faith, hoping that others will fill in the details and correct me where my memory is mistaken, because I am sure that you need to act as soon as possible. First, all is not lost if the tree bark is not 'ringed' or nearly ringed as my dad called it. Ringed means that the bark has been removed from all the way around the trunk, with no healthy branches below it. Any branches that have lost their bark in a ring all around them should also be written off. This is because nourishment is transported on the outside of the wood, and all the channels have been broken. If there is very little bark left on the branch consideration should be made as to whether it is worth trying to save it, based on how much is left and how vital that branch was to the tree, in terms of how much leaf it produced. All branches that appear to be diseased or fungus infected in any way should be removed, since infection will travel to the damaged areas whatever you try to do to stop it.

All loose splinters should be cut out carefully, and with a straight horizontal cut, from their lowest or highest point of attachment to the tree, since these will also encourage fungus and infection. In the case of the lower picture where over half of the branch has been chewed away and the bark is damaged, that should be carefully removed. It looks like it will split away in the first strong wind anyway.

Finally, my dad would apply anti-fungal and anti-rot 'tar' as he called it - don't know what it was I know it wasn't road tar, others on this site will advise.

In the case of a very large area, he would a cover it in this substance, then tape on clean sacking that had been soaked in it. He also covered large areas of abrasion to the bark only with a kind of wax - very like ordinary paraffin wax. Others on this site will perhaps know what that was?
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dinahdabble
Rank attained: Rowan Tree
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Joined: 24 Mar 2009
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PostPosted: Thu Dec 03, 2009 10:17 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I have just read in a book I borrowed from the library that these days they don't tend to apply bitumen to the wounds of trees, rather they use a fungicidal wash. This is apparently because a long lasting coating of tar can delay the formation of wound wood - which eventualy covers the damaged area. If you ask in a gardening shop for stuff to put on wounded trees, they should be able to provide the modern version.
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michael brenock
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PostPosted: Fri Dec 04, 2009 5:52 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

stockholm tar was the iold cure for wounds on trees. Medo is a modern cure.dinadabble has given very good advice there.
michael brenock horticultural advisor (retired)
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