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Most durable native trees to plant from seed


 
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Yew Too
Rank attained: Hazel Tree
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Joined: 23 Oct 2009
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PostPosted: Sun Oct 25, 2009 3:42 pm    Post subject: Most durable native trees to plant from seed Reply with quote

Hello all,

First off, I'm a total novice to gardening/forestry.I'm planning to plant trees from seed in Dublin, Wicklow and Wexford in a variety of different habitats. I won't be able to put in a lot of time monitoring these trees and I won't be scarifying or stratifying the seeds in advance.

What's the best tree to plant that does not need a lot of TLC and can survive and thrive without external assistance? I know that it really depends on soil, drainage etc so all advice is welcome.

I think that Willow could be good, but I would like some other options.

Thanks
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Belfast
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PostPosted: Thu Oct 29, 2009 11:39 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

What area of tree do you wan to plant?
What is the purpose of the trees?
fuel?
decorative?
shelter?

Do you plan on doing any other gardening in the same area or just grow trees?

Is there a limit on the size of trees you want ( are the near houses)?
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Yew Too
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PostPosted: Sun Nov 15, 2009 2:00 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks for the reply and apologies for the delay in mine.I guess I should have been a bit more informative in my original post.

to answer your questions.

1) Area of trees

I'll be mostly planting one off trees but sometimes several of the same type in an area. Not mass planting.

2) Purpose of trees

Decorative / Shelter

3) Other gardening

No, there will be no other gardening in the area, just trees. However there will more than likely be other flora in the area. For example the trees won't be planted on a lawn or managed habitat.

4) Size limit

No , there is no size limit
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vincentdunne
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PostPosted: Sun Nov 15, 2009 11:15 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I don't get this, Yew too. It does not make sense to try and grow 'one off' or even small groups of trees from seed sown in situ.
Seedlings of most native species are easy and cheap to buy and if you are not monitoring them, planting seedlings would at least give them a fighting chance.
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medieval knievel
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PostPosted: Mon Nov 16, 2009 3:58 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

i'd suggest hedging your bets (pun unintended) and putting down a bunch of seeds in each area and letting them fight it out amongst themselves. the type of seeds will affect how they're sown - oak and hazel are best buried a few inches, but birch etc. will be broadcast.
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Yew Too
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PostPosted: Tue Nov 24, 2009 7:57 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I guess I'll come clean to explain my motivation Smile I'm planning to plant trees on underutilsed public land that I may come across and encourage people to do the same. something along the lines of what The Guerrillia Gardening movement get up to. It's a personal initiative to increase the number of trees in our society for all the benefits that they provide.

That's the reason I won't be around to nurture the trees. I will be recording locations for periodic checks but that's it.

vincentdunne wrote:
I don't get this, Yew too. It does not make sense to try and grow 'one off' or even small groups of trees from seed sown in situ.
Seedlings of most native species are easy and cheap to buy and if you are not monitoring them, planting seedlings would at least give them a fighting chance.


I'm not against purchasing seedlings and planting those directly. Since I'm a novice and don't really have the space for a mini nursery type situation. The most I would manage is a few pots on a windowsill.

I will look into this as an option. Do you have any ballpark costs per seedling by any chance? I'll go off and Google this as well of course.

medieval knievel wrote:
i'd suggest hedging your bets (pun unintended) and putting down a bunch of seeds in each area and letting them fight it out amongst themselves. the type of seeds will affect how they're sown - oak and hazel are best buried a few inches, but birch etc. will be broadcast..


Thanks for the info about seed depths. That's news to me Smile What do you mean by "Broadcast"? I'll be doing plenty more research and planning before I spring into action anyway. Like I said I've a lot to learn.
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dinahdabble
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PostPosted: Tue Nov 24, 2009 11:16 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Here is what I have found out to be the best way to start native trees off from seed. It is a low budget method, that needs little space, which I hope you'll find suitable This is only my experience since I am not trained in horticulture.

1) All native tree seeds should be planted once they are ripe, usually in the Autumn or Early Winter and left to stratify outside over winter. Most of their seeds [i]need[/i] to be exposed to a period of cold weather before they will germinate well - the process called stratification - in order to break their dormancy. The acorn is slightly unusual in that it seems to want to get going as soon as possible because it is prone to rotting or getting eaten by squirrels, so it will grow indoors on a windowsill - though this is not necessary.

2) The cheapest way to plant your seed is to go to supermarket and fruit and veritable shops and ask them for the old plastic mushroom cartons, plastic bread or fruit crates, or anything similar that will not rot away over the winter. These are usually in a skip at the back, waiting to go to landfill, but it is best to ask permission.

3) When you have these collected start adapting them. Mushroom cartons have holes in the sides that need covering with masking or parcel tape to stop the soil and seeds from washing out. Then they must have lots of holes made in the bottom, either with a sharp instrument or a drill. Once you have gone to all this trouble, you are well on your way to successful planting, because the cartons are much deeper than the usual seed trays, and so there will be much more root space for the seedlings to develop before they can be planted out the following autumn or winter. If you are using bread crates for bigger plantings, line them with plastic (with lots of small holes punched in the bottom) weed control fabric, or even fine mesh onion sacks from the same fruit shop or supermarket. Crates can be stacked several high for stratifying if you manage to get hold of the right sort.

4) Now you must put lots of grit in the bottom of your trays for drainage. This is essential, since all seeds are susceptible to rotting and damage from freezing water and soil is prone to compacting and clogging Check after you have put the drainage material in (anything from pebbles and broken up bricks to chips of polystyrene packaging pieces) that it drains well by pouring on water and seeing if it runs away freely. An inch should be enough.

5) Mix up some well rotted leaf debris (can be gathered from any roadside where it will have formed a fibrous, muddy mound, or you can skim off the top leaves along a hedge or in a wood, and take a little of the best rotted stuff from underneath). You mix this with sand or well draining loam. The seedlings won't need to be well nourished until they've developed their first leaves, so rich, garden compost or food is not needed, in fact it can cause them to rot. Anything from 2 parts leaf mould and one part sand to a half and half mixture have worked for me, depending on how much soil and sand were already present in the leaf mould.

6) Clean the seeds of debris, give them a soak overnight if they are not wet already, and then plant them as thinly as is practical, at the appropriate depths (here I bow to the excellent, expert advise above). Label the planted boxes (a strip of pizza base polystyrene can be written on with a Biro) and put them somewhere they [i]will[/i] be exposed to frost or cold, but [i]won't [/i]be exposed to the worst of the wind and wet. On the sheltered side of a hedge would do, under an overhanging tree (or with crates, stacked up, though watch they don't dry out completely and there's room for some light to get in).

7) Now leave them till spring, occasionally removing debris that blows in, and making sure that the local cats don't mistake them for litter trays (you might like to put a bit of old wire mesh over the top if this is likely). As soon as the first seedlings start to sprout in spring, move them to a sheltered and bright and if possible warm location, Start to feed them when the first real leaves appear, and water them in dry weather. Planting them out can either be in the first or second winter, depending on how well they've grown (with the possible need to transplant them if they are running out of root space) and how exposed or how crowded with weeds the place is where they are going to be planted.

Sorry to be long winded :roll: I hope my method is helpful to you. :)
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Yew Too
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PostPosted: Mon Nov 30, 2009 7:44 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Wow, that's fantastic advice. Thanks a million. I'm going to try a bit of everything I think, including buying seedlings. I would also be open to any more advice about planting depths and the like though.

I will post back on this forum when I get my act together as regards the Guerrilla Forestry initiative.
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