Irish Gardeners Forum Home
 FAQFAQ   MemberlistMemberlist   UsergroupsUsergroups   RegisterRegister 
 ProfileProfile   Log in to check your private messagesLog in to check your private messages   Log inLog in 
Custom Search
   
Weather Report /
Moon Phase for Ireland

Post new topic   Reply to topic    Irish Gardeners Forum Home -> Vegetable growing, fruit and allotments in Ireland

Garlic,Spring Onions problems


 
Most Recent Posts funny
Last post: tagwex
Skimmia seed wanted
Last post: Brendankearns
At last! A garden joke. (except maybe it's not a joke!)
Last post: Ado 2
2016 Vegetable quizz.
Last post: Greengage
 
Visit TheGardenShop.ie
Author Message
sue
Rank attained: Hazel Tree
Rank attained: Hazel Tree


Joined: 12 Oct 2009
Posts: 4
Location: WICKLOW

PostPosted: Mon Oct 19, 2009 8:39 pm    Post subject: Garlic,Spring Onions problems Reply with quote

Hi,I wonder if anyone can help me with a problem on my new allotment.My garlic just broke through the soil and the tops have been eaten off,also some of my baby spring onions have been pulled up and the ends eaten.Broccoli and leeks were not touched?
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Belfast
Rank attained: Sessile Oak Tree
Rank attained: Sessile Oak Tree


Joined: 23 Apr 2009
Posts: 296
Location: CSA

PostPosted: Tue Oct 20, 2009 10:58 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Any photos

do you get rabbits or cats in the Garden ?
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
sue
Rank attained: Hazel Tree
Rank attained: Hazel Tree


Joined: 12 Oct 2009
Posts: 4
Location: WICKLOW

PostPosted: Tue Oct 20, 2009 10:02 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hi Belfast,
Thanks for reply,hope picture comes out ok never tried to post pic before.Covered with net so no more eaten.



Garlic eaten.jpg
 Description:
 Filesize:  40.61 KB
 Viewed:  3257 Time(s)

Garlic eaten.jpg


Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
walltoall
Rank attained: Orchard owner


Joined: 25 Aug 2008
Posts: 705
Location: Thurrock RM15 via Dungarvan and the Banner County

PostPosted: Wed Oct 21, 2009 10:52 am    Post subject: tips of garlic eaten Reply with quote

My guess is wood-pigeons. The net should stop them. If you were here in Thurrock I'd suspect Ring-Necked-Parakeets.

Sometimes when you plant onion sets very lightly in rich loam, you find some most or all of them upside down a few days later. Don't laugh but it's done by WORMS before the sets develop a root system to hold tthem up/down?. The wums think the wee sets are leaves and try to pull them underground. But of course the bulk does not allow them to succeed with their cunning plan to add humus to your garden.

When you lift such sets you'll find a worm-hole underneath. Just stick 'em more firmly in the ground and repeat as needed. Worms give up easily.

_________________
Retired trouble-maker. twitters @walltoall and dreams of being promoted to Pedunculate Oaker.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
sue
Rank attained: Hazel Tree
Rank attained: Hazel Tree


Joined: 12 Oct 2009
Posts: 4
Location: WICKLOW

PostPosted: Wed Oct 21, 2009 6:17 pm    Post subject: Garlic problems Reply with quote

Thanks for reply Walltroll
Checked today and no more damage.Maybe I could get some more advice.Have a new allotment have worked half of it but the other half may not get worked on if the weather turns to bad.Half will be for potatoes and the rest for beans,peas,root veg ect. It has been rotavated 3 times by owner but all it has done is to break up the couch grass roots and now loads of new grass growing.Should I cover with plastic or leave it be till early spring?Any advice welcome.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
walltoall
Rank attained: Orchard owner


Joined: 25 Aug 2008
Posts: 705
Location: Thurrock RM15 via Dungarvan and the Banner County

PostPosted: Wed Oct 21, 2009 10:47 pm    Post subject: scutch, couch and all that. Reply with quote

Couch is the very divil to get rid of. Quite frankly (and it goes against my instincts) I found the only way to deal with scutch was by using chemical warfare. I don't spray the systemic weedkiller. I paint it on to each leaf neat from the bottle with an artist's brush. A tiny dab per ' leaf '. slow, laborious, tedious, boring and ongoing for maybe three or four months during the growing season but it's far better than digging over and over extracting all the little rhisomes one by one.

There's nothing wrong with laying down plastic sheeting or old carpet or my favourite, underlay (black side up to maximise soil heating in Spring). All these inhibit growth and kill off most weeds. However, they work by starving leaves of sunlight. Some plants can't cope with such treatment and keel over. But scutch 'goes to ground' literally. The green growth dies but the white rhisomes stay alive in damp soil apparently indefinitely. When you lift the sheeting they're off again

_________________
Retired trouble-maker. twitters @walltoall and dreams of being promoted to Pedunculate Oaker.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
michael brenock
Rank attained: Chlorophyll for blood


Joined: 12 Aug 2008
Posts: 1275
Location: cork

PostPosted: Thu Oct 22, 2009 8:03 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

for scutch try roundup or glyphosate, diluted with water 10 to one. The best time to apply it is any time from late April to end of september. if only a few plants have to be treated use a sponge held in your hand wearing a rubber glove and dilute the roundup 2 -3 to one.
it is a good iea now at this time of year to cover the ground with black plastic mulch tucked in at the edges with soil. The rotavator will have done a lot of breaking and spreading up the scutch grass roots.
michael brenock horticultural advisor (retired)
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
sue
Rank attained: Hazel Tree
Rank attained: Hazel Tree


Joined: 12 Oct 2009
Posts: 4
Location: WICKLOW

PostPosted: Thu Oct 22, 2009 8:23 pm    Post subject: Thanks Lads Reply with quote

Thanks for words of advice,think I will try an experiment going to remove what I can off a third and cover with black plastic,cover another third and do nothing to it and the last third remove what I can and leave uncovered.
I will see what has happened in early spring and spray if it is to bad to work with.
Thanks again Smile
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Display posts from previous:   
Post new topic   Reply to topic    Irish Gardeners Forum Home -> Vegetable growing, fruit and allotments in Ireland All times are GMT
Page 1 of 1

 

Jump to:  
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum
You can attach files in this forum
You can download files in this forum


Powered by phpBB © 2001, 2005 phpBB Group

Privacy Policy | Copyright © 2006 - 2016 IrishGardeners.com (part of GardenPlansIreland.com)