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Planting a wood


 
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missdevon
Rank attained: Hazel Tree
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Joined: 12 May 2009
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PostPosted: Thu Oct 01, 2009 9:23 pm    Post subject: Planting a wood Reply with quote

Hello,
I would like to plant a wood of native trees this Autumn, half an acre or so, and I'm looking for advice about which varieties to plant beside each other.

I intend to plant ash, hazel and willow mainly because they are the most common around here but I'd like to include some alder, birch, aspen, yew and bushes too.

Any advice would be appreciated. Smile
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Belfast
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Joined: 23 Apr 2009
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Location: CSA

PostPosted: Thu Oct 01, 2009 10:43 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

what kind of soil you got?
is it well drained or very wet?
how high above sea leave is the land?
What is the aspect?
what part of the country?

Native Irish Trees --- List of Trees Native to Ireland
http://www.gardenplansireland.com/forum/about69.html
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missdevon
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PostPosted: Fri Oct 02, 2009 2:42 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Of course I should have included those details Smile

It's about 275ft above sea level, the soil is quite heavy and dense. It's well-drained. The view (if that's what you mean by aspect) is farmland and bog. I'm in East Galway.
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medieval knievel
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PostPosted: Fri Oct 02, 2009 8:06 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

by aspect he probably means which direction the land slopes.
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Garlicbreath
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PostPosted: Fri Oct 02, 2009 8:26 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

and what direction it faces, eg. south facing slope. I'm sure your trees will appreciate the view regardless Very Happy Very Happy
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missdevon
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PostPosted: Sun Oct 04, 2009 8:53 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Embarassed Sorry I wasn't sure... There's a couple of rows of mature ash and beech already there and I was going to plant them to the South of that row. It's fairly flat land and is open to south, west and east more or less. Hope this helps Smile
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Belfast
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PostPosted: Wed Oct 14, 2009 8:47 pm    Post subject: aspect in horticulture Reply with quote

"The importance of light
Put bluntly, plants die without sunlight. Sunlight is the 'engine' that powers growth - a process called photosynthesis.

In the wild (which is where most garden plants come from) light levels vary. Being cunning little chaps, different plants evolved to thrive in different levels of light. Clearly the amount of light your garden gets will have a big impact on what plants grow well.
Garden aspect
©
Aspect
The overall amount of light received depends on aspect, the direction your garden faces. Use a compass.

* North-facing gardens get the least light and can be damp
* South-facing gardens get the most light
* East-facing gardens get morning light
* West-facing gardens get afternoon and evening light"

http://www.bbc.co.uk/gardening/htbg/module1/light1.shtml

what is the plan to use the wood for ?

fire wood
Shelter
Decorative
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medieval knievel
Rank attained: Chlorophyll for blood


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PostPosted: Wed Oct 14, 2009 9:04 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

alder tends to prefer riverbanks, so your soil may be too well drained for it.
if you're intending to crop for firewood, birch and willow would be good fast growing species. hazel is generally an understorey plant, so i assume would do well under brich, which doesn't cast shade as deep as a lot of other trees.
rowan would be another option.
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Guelder
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PostPosted: Thu Oct 15, 2009 11:03 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

missdevon wrote:
Of course I should have included those details Smile

It's about 275ft above sea level, the soil is quite heavy and dense. It's well-drained. The view (if that's what you mean by aspect) is farmland and bog. I'm in East Galway.


I'm a bit confused by your description of the soils. Generally by their nature, bogs aren't well drained, and well drained soil doesn't tend to be heavy and dense? But it is true that you have both well drained and boggy land in East Galway, so it is important to identify which you have in the half acre you are planting. The existing vegetation will probably tell you all you need to know.

Assuming it is well drained, if you're between Loughrea and Portumna you are very lucky. You should be able to grow a lot of the bigger species like Beech, Oaks etc...

Much of the rest of east Galway has thin soils that favour ashes, hazels, birches and the local Whitebeam etc...

My recommendation is to look at what big trees grow locally and take your cue from that. You can then mix in a few more 'exotic' natives and non-natives.

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