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Apple Tree pruning, all young trees.


 
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jgroarke
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PostPosted: Wed Sep 02, 2009 3:16 pm    Post subject: Apple Tree pruning, all young trees. Reply with quote

Hi All,
I have three apple trees. I had only one apple this year but I believe it was a bad year for apples. The question I want to ask here is this. Do I neeD to prune my trees at this time. They are all young threes between 5 and 6 years. Also would I need to spray them with anything now or later.
Thanks
Jim

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Sean Ph'lib
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PostPosted: Wed Sep 02, 2009 4:17 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

First of all, what varieties of apples are they? And what rootstocks are they on? The thing is: if they're on dwarfing stocks, they should be fruiting at five or six years old, whereas if they're standards or half-standards, you wouldn't be getting many apples on them at that age. Also, if the varieties are not compatible with each other, you won't be getting proper pollination and, subsequently, not many apples.
Regarding pruning: you also need to know the variety here, as some are tip-pruned, and some are spur-pruned. The whole pruning business is a bit complicated to explain here, as some is done in winter and some in summer. If you can get an expert to show you, that's the best way; otherwise get hold of a good book.
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michael brenock
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PostPosted: Wed Sep 02, 2009 4:38 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

pruning is a quagmire and some so called experts believe that the more wood they cut off the better the client will like it. here are a few pointers:
pruning is usually done from November to March. Cut out all dead and diseased wood.
Remove one third to a half the length of all the previous year's growth except where the variety is a tip bearer (bud will be plump). Cut out shoots and branches that are crossing one another. Shorten back any shoot that is growing too high or out of line with the others. Observe and note the difference between a growth bud and a fruit bud. The harder you prune the more the tree grows and delays cropping. The rootstock governs the rate of growth of the tree while pruning helps to fine tune and correct that
michael brenock horticultural advisor(retired)
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James Kilkelly
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PostPosted: Wed Sep 02, 2009 5:23 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I agree with " not going over the top on pruning" tips
Here is a helpful article I wrote on the subject a while back....How to prune an apple tree without fear.

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Sean Ph'lib
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PostPosted: Wed Sep 02, 2009 9:41 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

michael brenock wrote:
pruning is a quagmire and some so called experts believe that the more wood they cut off the better the client will like it. here are a few pointers:
pruning is usually done from November to March. Cut out all dead and diseased wood.
Remove one third to a half the length of all the previous year's growth except where the variety is a tip bearer (bud will be plump). Cut out shoots and branches that are crossing one another. Shorten back any shoot that is growing too high or out of line with the others. Observe and note the difference between a growth bud and a fruit bud. The harder you prune the more the tree grows and delays cropping. The rootstock governs the rate of growth of the tree while pruning helps to fine tune and correct that
michael brenock horticultural advisor(retired)

With all due respect, Michael, that's about as much help to a novice as a kick in the goolies.
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michael brenock
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PostPosted: Wed Sep 02, 2009 9:55 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

with all due respect to everyone who reads the reply I sent in good faith it makes me wonder what am I doing it for. It is not my problem if you do not understand my advice but in future I will be more circumspect. i appreciate the many messages of thanks that i have received in the past it made it all worthwhile.
michael brenock horticultural advisor (retired)
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Sean Ph'lib
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PostPosted: Wed Sep 02, 2009 10:37 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Ah Michael, don't be getting upset! I understand your advice, and it's on the button... but it's a bit over the head for a fellow who knows nothing about pruning an apple tree, which (as you say) is a quagmire. Don't take any notice of me...I'm inclined to be a bit blunt.
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verge
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PostPosted: Thu Sep 03, 2009 12:27 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Sean Ph'lib wrote:
With all due respect, Michael, that's about as much help to a novice as a kick in the goolies. but it's a bit over the head for a fellow who knows nothing about pruning an apple tree, which (as you say) is a quagmire. Don't take any notice of me...I'm inclined to be a bit blunt.


I understand where you are coming from on this Sean Ph'lib, but please keep the kickin' of the goolies out of this. A ten year old apple tree enthusiast could be reading this.
If you have any further learned and earned advice on fruit tree pruning I'm sure the original poster would love to read it and it would benefit our store of information.

michael brenock wrote:
with all due respect to everyone who reads the reply I sent in good faith it makes me wonder what am I doing it for. It is not my problem if you do not understand my advice but in future I will be more circumspect. i appreciate the many messages of thanks that i have received in the past it made it all worthwhile.
michael brenock horticultural advisor (retired)


Michael as always your advice is welcome and judging by the response of the members you have helped I am not alone in thinking this. Be as lavish as you want with your replies. I'm sure if a poster needs areas cleared up they will also not be shy to ask.

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birdie
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PostPosted: Thu Sep 03, 2009 1:16 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

My 2 cent. First off michael brenock dont ever change. I love your advice here.
jgroarke I would not worry about spraying or pruning until you can get a crop. I would look at the pollination as the other posters mentioned. Are the trees flowering around the same time? Do you know the names because if you do then we may be able to judge if they are suited to each other.
Maybe they are not even flowering well and that could be a fertility issue that can be addressed with a spring feed. A feed will also help form apples.
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jgroarke
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PostPosted: Thu Sep 03, 2009 2:02 pm    Post subject: Apple Trees Reply with quote

Thanks all. And with all due respect to our Kerry friend Michaels advise was very helpful. Thank you all and UP CORK!!!
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jgroarke
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PostPosted: Thu Sep 03, 2009 2:20 pm    Post subject: Apple Trees Reply with quote

Thank you all for your advise. Two of the trees are Cox P and the other is a 2 variety grafted (Cox P and James Greevy). There are all dwarf stock. They did produce lots of fruit last year but nothing this year. The double variety tree produces lots of flowers but one stock blooms later than the other. They are both supposed to pollinate each other, so I wonder if the later blooming of the second variety was to blame.
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michael brenock
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PostPosted: Thu Sep 03, 2009 5:53 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

sean Ph'lib
thank you for your remarks and thanks a million from those who gave such encouragement and support. no hard feelings on this side. I enjoy responding to a problem when I see one. i would miss the forum.
michael brenock horticultural advisor (retired)
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