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Traditional Irish Recipes wanted


 
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DeanRIowa
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PostPosted: Fri Aug 28, 2009 1:40 pm    Post subject: Traditional Irish Recipes wanted Reply with quote

Being from the USA and having Irish heritage, I have always wanted some traditional Irish recipes.

Maybe you could give me couple recipes that your mom always made.

thanks,
Dean
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nemo
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PostPosted: Sun Dec 27, 2009 7:03 pm    Post subject: recipes Reply with quote

what exactly do you want i have a few bread recipes and recipes for jams and jelly's which have been handed down through the years.but if you are writing a cook book i would want royalties only joking.would this be of any use
regards nemo
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walltoall
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PostPosted: Sun Dec 27, 2009 11:16 pm    Post subject: traditional irish recipes Reply with quote

Colcannon is pretty much accepted as traditional fare. We sometimes got it as children in the early 50s. But where does the word come from. Although some people use the word "cabáiste" the real Irish word for cabbage is Cál [sounding like the English word 'call' or 'coll'].The Irish term for a white-face animal is "ceann fhionn" or "ceannán" [pronounced to rhyme, sorta, with the English word 'cannon'.]

In 19th century Ireland, cabbage (or kail) was basically grown to supplement animal rations. But when times were hard, chopped boiled 'cabbage' would be mixed into mashed potatoes (and if they were lucky maybe a bit of lard or butter) to make green and white col cannon. Now you can google "colcannon" and get maybe 250,000 recipes for the most traditional Irish dish of all.

And while you're eating it you can spout the history of the word colcannon.

EDITED (for Sal and Dean): The English "Bubble and Squeak" although similar to colcannon has an entirely different history and is a very different recipe. Wikipedia has a very good description of B+S and I bow to their superior knowledge. "Pandy" is well-known in Ireland and was frequently the earliest solid food fed to babies at weaning.

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Last edited by walltoall on Mon Dec 28, 2009 12:44 pm; edited 1 time in total
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sal
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PostPosted: Mon Dec 28, 2009 12:04 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

to me colcannon is much the same as bubble and squeek,ate that first in london as a kid,and its on the menu in cafes with your breakfast fry.
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sal
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PostPosted: Mon Dec 28, 2009 12:09 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

my irish mum used to give the tots mashed potato and milk ,she called it pandy,i`ve since heard it here by mums .
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DeanRIowa
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PostPosted: Tue Dec 29, 2009 10:04 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Colcannon sounds interesting and I will have to give it a try.

I did a Google search and see that an old Halloween tradition was to hide coins in it. Is that still done, and if so why on Halloween?

thanks,
Dean
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walltoall
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PostPosted: Tue Mar 16, 2010 8:43 pm    Post subject: halloween and barm brack and hidden treasures Reply with quote

DeanRIowa,
Sorry for losing this thread and not coming back to you. I know your purpose is to collect traditional recipes and I'd hoped our lot would have lashed in loads of recipes based on the stuff we traditionally grow in our gardens. Maybe my re-opening the thread will buck some of them up.

For countless centuries Ireland has celebrated the solstices and equinoxes. They also had two intermediate celebrations at Bealtaine and Samhan, which nowadays are the Irish names for the months of May and November. Samhan was a spooky time, when thoughts turned to the next life, to souls that had departed and to the long Winter nights ahead.

Fast forward to the 17th and 18th century when the Irish people had been pauperised by their 'conquerers'. needs must when wealth is scarce or absent. So the barm brack was 'invented', basically a yeast bread sweetened up with a little mashed carrot ( long superceded by sugar) and cherries and damsons from gardens and hedgerows (superceded by mixed peel and currants). The barm brack was baked in a bastible (google it) and depending on custom , a ring, a twig (we used rosemary!) and a tiny rag were dropped into the mix. The eating of barm-brack on Oiche Shamhna (The Night of Souls) became custom through the 19th century and right through the 20th til people got well off.

The one who found the ring would marry first, the one who got the rag would always be well dressed and I can't remember what the stick signified. But every one went happy into the winter.

Now maybe some traditional irish reciopes will flow in and we'll get the thread back on track?

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simonj
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PostPosted: Sun May 30, 2010 10:04 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I just did an Irish style recipe that would be familiar enough to Americans who like Collared greens.

It is the first meal to come from my new garden, and its a new recipe, so I am quite proud of it.

For more pictures, meal plan and other suggestions / advice on the recipe, and where the idea came from see my blog (link below in signature)

I just came up with it when I was clearing the garden a bit, rather than throw away food, use it.

And so, inspired by the words origin and familiarity, I believe I have created the first Dutch - Irish cullnary fusion, I am certainly claiming I have from this day forth.
Sounds like Basil Fawltys' Finno Japanese veal, but we will give it a shot.

That ain't bad considering neither nation is particularly renowned for cuisine.
Basically its a kind of Irish themed version of a Dutch staple, and its a very economical dish as well.

Because it is turnip leaves I feel I am getting twice the value from the crop, that was grown from seed anyway.

Instread of turnip leaves, you can substitute Kale, Spinach or a strong cabbage.

SIMON'S 10 STEP IRISH STAMPPOT



INGREDIENTS
(Serves 2 hungry lads easy)

1 KG Peeled Potato
400gm Shredded Turnip Greens (or other greenleaf brassica)
150gm bacon or rashers diced and sliced**
Knob of Butter**
Tablespoon Balsamic Vinegar (optional)
salt and pepper to taste.

*For a vegetarian / vegan version, substitute margerine or oliveoil for butter, and sundried tomato's for the bacon, but I would reduce to about 100gm at least first time out, the flavour is stronger than bacon.
====
1) Boil Potatoes

2) While these are boiling wash the turnip leaves.
Remove and discard the central spine, very finely chop the turnip greens.

3) Chop smoked rashers or bacon.

4) When the potato's are nearly cooked, strain and set aside, keep warm

5) Return pot to heat, any remaining water will evaporate quickly, add knob of butter

6) It wont take long to get up to heat, add bacon and stir-fry, takes about 2 minutes

7) Add greens, stir fry until coated with bacon fat - about 2 minutes, strain off excess oil

8 ) Add balsamic vinegar, this breaks up the fat, stir through for another minute.

9) Return stained potato's to pot, mash up all ingredients.
Add salt and pepper to taste - GO EASY ON THE SALT, its already in the bacon.

10) Serve dressed with grilled slices of black pudding and apple sauce on the side, a little wholegrain mustard and garnish with chives, parsley etc. from garden

SERVED WITH:
Grilled Black Pudding, Apple and Leek Sauce (Recipe on Blog), and a dollop of wholegrain mustard - Guinness wholegrain would be my first choice.

I would recommend serving with good, strong reds like Merlots from Cimarosa, South Africa or Eaglehawk, Australia which are available and around the €6-9 mark.

Another option is a good Belgian beer like Leffe or La Coufe - or for something fresher and lighter a Wittebier like Hoegarden or - my favorite - Korenwolfe, but more about that on the Blog

Enjoy

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Last edited by simonj on Mon May 31, 2010 12:27 pm; edited 6 times in total
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simonj
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PostPosted: Sun May 30, 2010 10:39 pm    Post subject: Re: traditional irish recipes Reply with quote

And to go back off track Laughing

walltoall wrote:
Although some people use the word "cabáiste" the real Irish word for cabbage is Cál [sounding like the English word 'call' or 'coll'.


An Simul ar fad a mhac- In Connemara, we always said cabáiste, I suppose it has just been accepted, and native speakers do tend to adopt anglo words in place of the 'official' standardised Irish for new items - e.g. Cár vs Glustain, bicicle vs rothair etc. etc.

But it is interesting, this could mean the plant was introduced by the Vikings or the Normans.

The American staple Collard Greens is a corruption of Coleworts, Anglo-Saxon terms literally meaning cabbage plants.

Its the same root as the Dutch/German word for Cabbage (Kool) - in Dutch, Kool Wort would translate as cabbage root.

The Irish word for rabbit, for example, is pronounced kuh-neen.
These animals were introduced by the Norse, whose language was close to Flemish - and the Dutch for rabbit is... konijn (pronounced Coe-Nine)

I wonder if it was the Vikings that introduced Cabbage to Ireland - if thats the case they still have a lot to answer for, as if prosecuting our ancestors was not enough, the school dinners I had to endure at St Jarlaths mean the cruelty continued, screw it - lets bomb Bergen.

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walltoall
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PostPosted: Mon May 31, 2010 9:53 am    Post subject: traditional irsh recipes using what we've grown Reply with quote

Maith an fear thú simonj, grand recipe and if I may be allowed to compliment grand presentation on the plate. That is a proper 21st cent traditional dish with ingredients from an Irish Garden.

Yeah I used cabáiste too and was born in a Munster breac-géalteacht. By a coincidence I'm studying Icelandic 'cuisine' and traditional cooking at the minute. Their word for rabbit is kanína and for cabbage kvítkál (kvít is white). BTW, there are no rabbits in Iceland so I think they may have brought the word from the Isle of Man after 1014.

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Last edited by walltoall on Mon May 31, 2010 7:32 pm; edited 1 time in total
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simonj
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PostPosted: Mon May 31, 2010 12:17 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Beidir e, but perhaps european rabbits could not survice the Icelandic climate, or volcanos for that matter - Fish, rotted shark and Whale meat as far as I know are standards, and pretty rank beer by all accounts.

And on that note - heres a poem on Iceland

====
Variation on an Ode to an Unpronouncable Volcano
====
The Volcano, in Iceland is fuming one more time,
And for a poet theres a problem for I cant find a rhyme.
Now Ive been told Ive a talent for the vocal.
but I just cant say the word Eyjafjallajökull

Its twisting me tounge, Its wracking my palete
and its pounding me brain like a hard swung mallet
the eruptions in Iceland but the ash cloud is local
But I just cant say it - Eyjafjallajökull

Its wreckin' me head and its causin' frustration
Unclimbable mountain of tough pronounciation
Im try'n and Im cry'n and I yet might beat it
But Eyjafjallajökull just has me defeated

See, Id like to write a poem but its causing me panic
That I cant say the name of that Nemisis volcanic
Tried saying it early, tried saying it later
And I'm down in the dumps - what a miserable crater

Its causing annoyance, thats what its doin'
And like every politician its blowing and its spewin'
And up goes the lava and down come the flights
Eyjafjallajökull gives me sleepless nights

And were queing in the airports, waiting on the planes
Jumping on the ferry boats and racking our brains
The trips been cancelled, the service cut in half
And Eyjafjallajökull is having a laugh

Try it yourself, every murderous syllable,
Torturing your tounge like something evil and killable
Vulcanologists use it, Newsreaders refuse it,
Eyjafjallajökull - why did they choose it

Iceland - A nice land of glaciers and Bjork,
But the banks there are buggered and theirs thousands out of work
The economys battered and bloody and gory
Eyjafjallajökull whats the bleedin' story?

Say it with me reader, lets say it together
Eyjafjallajökull means its dusty auld weather
If you shout it at your screen maybe I'll learn,
Eyjafjallajökull - burn baby burn

Its after going off again, you must be bloody joking,
Wish to high heavens it would give up the smoking,
Travel plans pounded Jumbojets grounded,
Peope must be wishing they could fly the planes around it

I suppose, I should be happy Im not stranded overseas
Because pronounciation problems arent much compared to these
If I knew the right prayer I'd be happy to pray it
Eyjafjallajökull - I just wish I could say it

But saying such a mouthful is troubling and taxing
And me tounge can't cope with an Icelandic accent
For its supercalifragilisticexpialidoc-al
But I cant get my head around - Eyjafjallajökull

And whats it mean, whats the translation,
No one seems to know in the whole United Nations,
Were the victims of nature, its a bit of a farce
Eyjafjallajökull means a pain in the --- neck

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Last edited by simonj on Fri Jun 04, 2010 9:57 am; edited 2 times in total
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DeanRIowa
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PostPosted: Tue Jun 01, 2010 1:00 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Nice looking recipe. I might try to make it this coming weekend, when I have more time.

thanks,
Dean
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