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Potatoe Harvest


 
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paddy mac fisto
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PostPosted: Mon Jul 13, 2009 9:51 am    Post subject: Potatoe Harvest Reply with quote

Absolutely delighted with my first crop of early potatoes. I grew Colleens. I can't remember whether the bag was 2.5 KGs or 2 but out of that I got 28.5 Kgs of gorgeous spuds. I've chipped some with great success but they're almost too good to chip. Boiled and served with a seriously unhealthy amount of butter is how most of them have gone. And gone they have, there was a few glum family faces when they were told that there was no more being delivered.

I did have a query as well though. On each plant I seemed to have 4-5 really large spuds, 1-2 salad sized ones and then a handful of tiny marble sized ones. Did I get so many "marbles" because I earthed up a little late maybe? Or is getting marbles part of the deal? Is 28.5 KGs a decent return? The taste of these spuds more than made up for the hard work of lugging barrow loads of manure back and forth on the plot.

Here's a pic of yesterdays load with some rainbow chard, beetroot (also yummy, Boltardy working really really well with little or no soil prep), carrot and turnip thinnings and a few of the peas that made it back to the house. Even after an hour the peas tasted totally different to when they were picked and eaten straight away.



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Liparis
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PostPosted: Mon Jul 13, 2009 10:45 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

It's just the different stages of development. Lift your potatoes one or two plants at a time as you need them, leave the rest in the ground until you need the next lot and those salad spuds will develop into bigger spuds and the marbles into salads.
Bill.

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paddy mac fisto
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PostPosted: Mon Jul 13, 2009 10:57 am    Post subject: Potatoe Harvest Reply with quote

Thanks Liparis. I cleared them all in 2 long sessions. I need the space for the leeks and celery anyway. Wondering would a couple of the pumpkins tolerate being moved as the ground is probably perfect for them and one or 2 of them could do with the extra space.
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breezyacre
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PostPosted: Mon Jul 13, 2009 6:53 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Was reading Jane Powers in the times mag. on Saturday and she made it sound like an emergency to get all early spuds out of the ground now. I have an old garden, in that the person who owned the garden before me probably grew spuds only. There are lots of bugs in the ground therefore only waiting for a good meal! I took all mine out ,but as I did I also noticed a few eel worms flexing their jaws. Got the spuds out in time though as only very few were holed. The weather at the moment is conducive to the spread of blight also so I think on the whole you are as well off to get the crop out of the ground. Judging by the pics you are making a good fist of the growing.
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michael brenock
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PostPosted: Mon Jul 13, 2009 8:49 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

if you were able to see eelworms without a magnifying glass then you have very good sight indeed. Eelworms do not eat potatoes but attach themselves to the roots of the potatoes. The cyst is only the size of the head of a pin but it is by their sheer numbers and persistence in the soil that they do so much harm. Maybe it was millipedes or centipedes that you saw, i hope
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michael brenock
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PostPosted: Mon Jul 13, 2009 8:55 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

btw in uk during the war they spelt potatoes without the E. as it saved ink
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paddy mac fisto
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PostPosted: Mon Jul 13, 2009 9:17 pm    Post subject: potato without the E Reply with quote

Stick that little gem in the book Michael. I didn't really notice any beasties in the ground while digging...lots of earthworms. No damage to any of the spuds really Other than one or two got a bite of the fork on the way out poor little divils. Can't wait to taste the sarpo mira and axona later on in the year. The leaves on these varieties are so different to the colleens and most of the other spuds on the plots I've noticed. A really pronounced flattened "spade" (as in the suit of cards) shape and not shiney at all, almost like they're matte and the other plants I've seen are soft sheen. Been painting alot lately...sorry
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Liparis
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PostPosted: Wed Jul 15, 2009 2:16 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

michael brenock wrote:
btw in uk during the war they spelt potatoes without the E. as it saved ink
mb


And they say the Scots are tight! Laughing
Bill.

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jimmy mac
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PostPosted: Fri Jul 17, 2009 2:46 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

hi all when you say leave your spuds in the ground and lift as needed how long can you do this for .I have nearly 1/4acre and will use about 3 15kg bags a week.Is it viable to lift when needed and if not what is the best way to store them ,preferably outside .Thanks for all advice
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Liparis
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PostPosted: Sat Jul 18, 2009 12:04 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

If you want to store new potatoes, dry peat is the best.
Remember, when harvesting any vegetable, the longer it's been picked/pulled up the more sugars turn to starches etc. so the more flavour is lost. You get a lot more flavour lifting from the garden and going straight to the kitchen. Even lifdting on one day and using the following day can mean a loss of flavour.
Summer Vegetables are always better left in the garden until needed, but if you need to store them, remember you have usually harvested before full maturity has been reached, therefore they won't store for very long periods. One of the main reasons a succession of lettuce, carrots, turnips etc are better being made rather than sowing the years needs at once.
Grow maincrops to full maturity for storage.
Bill.

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