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Post new topic   Reply to topic    Irish Gardeners Forum Home -> Vegetable growing, fruit and allotments in Ireland

What type of soot and how to apply it.


 
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colin79ie
Rank attained: Hazel Tree
Rank attained: Hazel Tree


Joined: 24 Jan 2009
Posts: 29
Location: NW

PostPosted: Sat Jul 11, 2009 3:10 pm    Post subject: What type of soot and how to apply it. Reply with quote

Hi,

There is a lot of talk about applying soot to plants recently.

I have an open fire and could get a bit of soot from the chimney.

Is this the correct soot. If so, how is it applied to plants?
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Belfast
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Joined: 23 Apr 2009
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PostPosted: Sat Jul 11, 2009 3:47 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

do you burn smokeless coal ?

"Soot - another widely available commodity in pre-electrical Britain. Most people depended on coal fires for cooking, and the soot could be sprinkled over the surface of the garden. Soot was not only considered a very powerful fertilizer, gardeners also believed it acted as a deterrent to wire-worms and maggots."
http://www.gardenhistoryinfo.com/gardenpages/manures.html

"Soot: No longer widely available as coal fires become rarer, soot contains nitrogen, and is a good general stimulant. Don't use it fresh, as the sulphur released can damage plants. Store it somewhere dry for about three months, then apply it as a top dressing on young plants. It also improves the texture of clay soil and, because of its dark colour, helps to warm soils through absorbtion of heat. It is said to deter pests such as pea weevil, celery fly, carrot fly and slugs."
Source and further information:
"Grow Your Own Vegetables By Joy Larkcom"
http://www.answerbag.com/q_view/656578
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