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Buxus sempervirens problem


 
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DamoH
Rank attained: Hazel Tree
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Joined: 07 Jul 2009
Posts: 16
Location: Meath

PostPosted: Wed Jul 08, 2009 8:05 am    Post subject: Buxus sempervirens problem Reply with quote

Hello
I have planted a Buxus semperviren (cone shaped) into a large pot, but I see the leaves going yellow then dying... any advice - see attached pictures ...

Thanks
D



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Sive
Rank attained: Chlorophyll for blood


Joined: 18 Apr 2008
Posts: 1731
Location: Co.Wexford

PostPosted: Wed Jul 08, 2009 9:44 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I had similar problems once, till I realised local tomcats were spraying two particular areas of my box cones, marking out their territories.........just mentioning that as a possibility, but I think your damage is too high for that ??
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DamoH
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PostPosted: Wed Jul 08, 2009 10:09 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I thought about that as I have a boxer who cocks his legs at anything not moving... Sad

But it's only the top that is affected...
I was wondering if its could be caused by the wind or excessive rain?
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Sive
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PostPosted: Wed Jul 08, 2009 7:08 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Another possibility: I believe there is some fungal disease affecting box....could it be the start of that do you think?
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James Kilkelly
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Joined: 30 May 2006
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Location: West of Ireland

PostPosted: Wed Jul 08, 2009 7:36 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

The summer drought is the first thing that comes to mind DamoH.
With the box being evergreen this drying out period could have happened 2 or 3 weeks before the signs showed up.
Whereas decidious or soft leaved plants tend to show drought stress signs much quicker eg bizzie lizzies wilting.
With evergreensometimes this damage can be done before the plant even enters your site.

If the plant is out in the open sun with breezes swirling around it as in the pic, then water evaporation would be rapid.
If it was not watered regularly then it may be stressed.

All is not lost though.
Just keep up the regular watering, move the pot to a sheltered but brightish location, and avoid feeding until it starts to pop out some new leaves.

Just as a matter of interest did you pot the box into the container it is in now or did the garden centre staff do this?

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DamoH
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PostPosted: Thu Jul 09, 2009 7:30 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks for the help all..
I actually planted the box myself, I planted it in compost and placed a few drainage holes in the bottom of the pot.... Is this OK?

D
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James Kilkelly
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PostPosted: Thu Jul 09, 2009 10:35 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

[quote="DamoH"] Is this OK?

[/quote]

Yep, that's grand.
Another tip or two for water conservation when you go to pot a plant the next time......

The next time you buy a terracota pot, buy some sealer in a paint shop as well.
Paint this onto the inside of the pot, preventing valuable water entering the pores of the pot.

The next time you plant a terracota pot invest in some water storage granules.
These crystals swell up with water and provide a reserve if needed.
You mix them into the compost as you fill the container.

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Please keep us updated on the box progress.

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Last edited by James Kilkelly on Sat Mar 06, 2010 10:14 pm; edited 1 time in total
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DamoH
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Location: Meath

PostPosted: Thu Jul 09, 2009 11:40 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks a Million.... will do!
As you probably noticed I have a few gardening projects on the go..hence all the questions.... so its great to get good advise!

D
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walltoall
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PostPosted: Thu Jul 09, 2009 4:25 pm    Post subject: buxus sempervirens Reply with quote

Hey Damoh,
Couple of things you never hear being said about box, so I'll say them. Firstly in the natural state, box like to grow in shady conditions or certainly in reduced sun. Secondly it likes a limey soil, quite the opposite of [for instance] camellia or rhododendron. GPI is right to point out drought. It hates being dried out. As you can imagine its natural environment is deciduous woods esp. beech where the floor never dries out. Shade is less an issue above 53N but with global warming it is BECOMING an issue. he other point that GPI makes is a drying wind. Who woukld ever have thought we'd be complaining about drying winds in Ireland. But GPI is right.
SW

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