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Hedge Options


 
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DamoH
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PostPosted: Tue Jul 07, 2009 1:09 pm    Post subject: Hedge Options Reply with quote

Hedging Options

Hello, I am looking to build a decking area with raised flower beds, however for privacy and shelter I was think of planting a hedge in the raised beds.
The beds will be approx 500mm deep and 500mm wide, and I was hoping to grow a hedge approx 4 - 5ft in height.
My question is what type of hedge would you recommend, what soil mix should I use for the beds.... I was thinks of escallonia

Thanks for you help
D
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Sean Ph'lib
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PostPosted: Tue Jul 07, 2009 8:21 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Escallonia makes a great hedge: nice to look at, good for bees, nesting sites for birds, quick-growing..... it's hard to better it. And any ordinary soil will do (of course, the richer, the better).
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DamoH
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PostPosted: Wed Jul 08, 2009 7:28 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks Sean.
Would there be any problem with planting them in a raised bed - below the bed soil will be gravel. As a beginner to gardening...what do you mean by a rich soil....is that a mix of good top soil and compost? Would I have to worry about drainage ie adding sand to the mix?

Thanks
D
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michael brenock
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PostPosted: Wed Jul 08, 2009 11:00 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Other choices of hedges are Cotoneaster lacteus. Viburnum tinus, Pittosporum spp.
if a soil is too rich for a hedge it will grow too fast and too lush(more frequent cutting). Soils are classified by their physical qualities as well as their fertility. You can always add plant food but improving the texture and physical quality is a slow process.
michael brenock horticultural advisor (retired)
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walltoall
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PostPosted: Thu Jul 09, 2009 4:35 pm    Post subject: sour grapees and other ericacious somentities Reply with quote

DamoH,
Use ericacious compost if planting escallonia. It does NOT like limey or chalky soil. Exact opposite of box! It also responds well to daily light watering, just throw a cupful of H2O over each plant each morning, unless there's been rain. Also it does not like being buffeted by wind.
SW

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DamoH
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PostPosted: Fri Jul 10, 2009 11:23 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

....so many options Very Happy
Just out of interest how do i check if my soil is limey or chalky - some sort of test kit? and how do i make my soil limey or chalky ..is it as simple as adding lime / chalk into my soil mix...if so to what ratio?

Ta
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verge
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PostPosted: Fri Jul 10, 2009 11:35 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

You can use a simple home soil test available in most garden centres to determine your soils ph. By taking account of the test results you can then decide how much if any special fertilisers or amendments are required to bring the to pH of your vegetable garden soil in line.

Ground lime can be used to make the soil more alkaline, with an application of 250g per metre squared commonly increasing ph by one point. However as lime is available in different formulations, I advise also consulting the rates set out on the pack.

If you need to decrease your ph to make the soil more acid, then you can apply sulphate of iron at a rate of 100g per metre squared for each drop in ph point.
Apply these products according to the manufacturers instructions and heed safety warnings especially those concerning the use of protective clothing.


This is taken from GPI's pice on vegetable gardens here The ph of vegetable garden soil and how to change it.

Also see this video DamoH



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walltoall
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PostPosted: Fri Jul 10, 2009 4:48 pm    Post subject: soil pH and hedging and all that Reply with quote

Hi DamoH,

Verge's response answers the precise question you asked excellently well.

However the subject of relative acidity can be a huge subject (consuming two or even three terms at Ag. or Hort.) Most plants, by and large, grow perfectly well in whatever you stuff them into. But certain plants are quite particular as to whether they need a limey or lime-free environment.

For gardeners its easy. Use ericaceous soil mixes bought from your nearest or dearest gardening supplier and fill your pots with it. Planting lime-haters in the open? Dig a big 'ole, fill it with you-know-what and Bob's your uncle. But use lots of the compound as its the teeniest rootlets at the outer extremities of the plant which absorb the acids. Mulching rhododendrons, camellias, azaleas, hydrangeas (and escallonia) with loads of green steaming grass cuttings is the best possible way of recycling the contents of your lawnmower bag. And its better on the rhodos than all over the house.

Garden centres make fortunes out of people trying to make lime-hating plants survive and thrive in the wrong soil. Smart gardeners mulch the lime haters with grass mowings which are well acid.

A plant described as 'ericaceous' has damp boggy secret in its background, probably is found naturally on mountains and moors where peat or coniferous trees lurk in it's history. Heathers (Latin erica geddit) are the most common ericaceous plant in Ireland, I guess, and you won't find much heather in the chalky soils North County Dublin or the limestone flags of the Burren.

'Acid' soil applies where the pH is less than 6.5. Above 7.3 is alkaline. Escallonia only gets really unhappy above 7.2 in my experience. One final point, you can use lithmus paper red and/or blue for a cheap shot. If red stays red in a wet mix of your specimen soil its acid. If it turns blue don't plant hydrangea.

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PostPosted: Wed Aug 22, 2012 6:12 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Excuse me jumping in here

michael brenock wrote:
Other choices of hedges are Cotoneaster lacteus. Viburnum tinus,
are they and/or upright hornbeam ericaceous Michael?

Quote:
if a soil is too rich for a hedge it will grow too fast and too lush
is that really bad if you want fast growth. Can the soil be 'unrichened' for want of a better word
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