Irish Gardeners Forum Home
 FAQFAQ   MemberlistMemberlist   UsergroupsUsergroups   RegisterRegister 
 ProfileProfile   Log in to check your private messagesLog in to check your private messages   Log inLog in 
Custom Search
   
Weather Report /
Moon Phase for Ireland

Post new topic   Reply to topic    Irish Gardeners Forum Home -> Vegetable growing, fruit and allotments in Ireland

Can Turnip/swede bolt?


 
Most Recent Posts funny
Last post: kindredspirit
Skimmia seed wanted
Last post: Brendankearns
At last! A garden joke. (except maybe it's not a joke!)
Last post: Ado 2
2016 Vegetable quizz.
Last post: Greengage
 
Visit TheGardenShop.ie
Author Message
caoimhin
Rank attained: Hazel Tree
Rank attained: Hazel Tree


Joined: 03 Jun 2008
Posts: 26

PostPosted: Mon Jun 22, 2009 10:04 pm    Post subject: Can Turnip/swede bolt? Reply with quote

I think the swede I have planted have bolted. The plants each have a flowery shoot about two foot high. Never planted swede before so I'm not sure. Any ideas.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Belfast
Rank attained: Sessile Oak Tree
Rank attained: Sessile Oak Tree


Joined: 23 Apr 2009
Posts: 296
Location: CSA

PostPosted: Mon Jun 22, 2009 10:27 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

yes they can bolt.

"Category:Turnips

Turnips, swedes, and Rutabaga,
These names are used somewhat interchangeably,
The vegetable known as rutabega in the U.S. is known as a swede or turnip here. This is Brassica napa, (as is oil seed rape amd some kales). It has blueish green grey leaves which are not hairy. They have yellow flesh.

The other vegetable known as turnip is Brassica rapa and has green hairy leaves. This is also know as 'white turnip, and is related to Chinese cabbages. They generally have white flesh. Both have a mild sweet taste, which is at its best when the vegetables are young.

Turnips are quick to grow and undemanding, providing vegetables at times of year when other things are scarce.
'White turnips' such as Milan Purple Top are one of the first vegetables ready to eat in summer and 'swedes' such as Tipperary Turnip are good to eat out of the garden from September until the end of March, when they start to bolt."

http://www.brownenvelopeseeds.com/index.php/wiki/grow_veg/Category:Turnips/

Tips for Growing Turnips and Rutabagas
"Both turnips and rutabagas are cool-weather vegetables and are commonly grown as fall crops. Turnips can also be planted in early spring, but they tend to "bolt," or produce seeds, and turn woody during hot weather."
http://homeideas.howstuffworks.com/vegetable-gardening/tips-for-growing-turnips-and-rutabagas.htm

"KOHL RABI

The origins of this root vegetable's name - the German for 'cabbage turnip' - describes its taste, which is a rooty, delicate, cabbagy flavour. It is highly nutritious and much more drought resistant - and therefore slow to bolt - than either swede or turnip. It grows fast as long as its water supply is steady and prefers a light soil. Firm the ground well, as for cabbages, and sow in drills at monthly intervals with latest sowings in September and October for a winter supply. Thin to 10-12in apart or sow in plugs, two or three seeds to a plug and plant out when growing strongly. Harvest 8-12 weeks from sowing. "
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/home/gardening/article-1168563/Monty-Don-grow-3.html
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
Liparis
Rank attained: Orchard owner


Joined: 23 Sep 2007
Posts: 651
Location: Co. Meath

PostPosted: Wed Jun 24, 2009 10:42 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Usually, but not always, Swede are grown to be used at a small size, normally a little over the size of a tennis ball, turnips are grown as a larger root. If you have grown swede a few things may have contributed to them bolting. Hot, dry weather and allowing them to get too large, possibly a combination. You refer to having planted your swedes; did you plant them or sow them? By that I mean did you sow the seed straight into the ground where they are to grow or did you sow them then transplant them?
Planting would work with other factors to encourage bolting of the crop. Normally they shouldn't produce flowers the first year but several factors would incourage that.
Bill.

_________________
Earth is the insane asylum of the Universe.

http://www.species-specific.com/orchid-forum/
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
Display posts from previous:   
Post new topic   Reply to topic    Irish Gardeners Forum Home -> Vegetable growing, fruit and allotments in Ireland All times are GMT
Page 1 of 1

 

Jump to:  
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum
You can attach files in this forum
You can download files in this forum


Powered by phpBB © 2001, 2005 phpBB Group

Privacy Policy | Copyright © 2006 - 2016 IrishGardeners.com (part of GardenPlansIreland.com)