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Transplanting Foxgloves...Advice please.


 
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Sive
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PostPosted: Sun Jun 21, 2009 11:46 am    Post subject: Transplanting Foxgloves...Advice please. Reply with quote

I have lots of foxglove self-sown seedlings developing into nice little plants. However they are not necessarily where I want them to be, and tend to be overcrowded too. Can anyone advise me as to when is the best time to move them, so that they will settle in and flower next summer?
Any experience/advice would be welcome, thank you.
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Liparis
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PostPosted: Sun Jun 21, 2009 12:10 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Shift them with a good ball of soil around the roots to prevent as little root disturbance as possible, fill the planting hole with water and then plant them in when the water has drained down into the soil. You can plant them anytime that way, just keep an eye on moisture content during warm/hot spells.
Bill.

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Sive
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PostPosted: Sun Jun 21, 2009 1:38 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks Liparis......so the way that I transplant them is more important than the time of year. The advice about filling the planting hole with water is brilliant. I will definitely do that from now on. Thanks for your help.
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michael brenock
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PostPosted: Sun Jun 21, 2009 9:10 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

My experience has been that late autumn is best time when growth is finished for the season and while they like moisture the dislike water-logging and their roots can go down quite deep for this purpose.
michael brenock horticultural advisor(retired)
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Sive
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PostPosted: Sun Jun 21, 2009 9:21 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

thank you, Michael, I'll make a note of that. I can immediately think of places that would suit them. I just love their stately spires of blooms and of course the bumble bees love them too.
Fabulous sunset here in Wexford....what a beautiful Longest Day it has been.
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Liparis
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PostPosted: Mon Jun 22, 2009 8:16 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Timing is better sive, I read your post as needing to shift them immediatly rather than waiting, I thought perhaps they were in your way at the moment. Soaking the planting hole was to assist in water getting well down into the soil so they didn't dry out during warmer weather.
Bill.

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PostPosted: Tue Jun 23, 2009 7:59 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks Liparis...no, I don't have to move them right now, and certainly with this good weather now, it would probably be madness...I'd have to keep watering them!
It's wonderful to have so many "free" plants. I'm watching some hellebore seedlings too, wondering what colours they'll be when they flower.
And my borage seeds itself from year to year. Have you ever grown it? Bees go mad for it.
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catman
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PostPosted: Tue Jun 23, 2009 11:06 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I had an electrician in today to fit outdoor lighting in the garden. Unfortunately he damaged a few plants while rumagging around the flower bed. A few are beyond repair and had to be removed. Unfortunately my foxglove was trampled on and all the stems flattened. A few were completely broken. I was wondering if I cut the broken and damaged stems off will it re-grow or will i have to remove it altogether? I will try to get a photo tomorrow.
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PostPosted: Wed Jun 24, 2009 7:57 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

If the stems aren't broken, but just flattened, support them by tying them up to a cane, and you will at least get pleasure out of them till the flowers fade. My foxgloves often keel over in the wind here, some break some don't.
Your electrician obviously had big feet!
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catman
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PostPosted: Wed Jun 24, 2009 11:50 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

He destroyed the place!!!!! Crying or Very sad Everything there was only planted at end of March so it hasn't set me back too much. Most of the stems have been broken with only maybe two that are flattened and could be stood up with a plant support. With the ones that are broken, I haven't removed them yet. I plan on doing it tonight. What is the best way to cut them? Should I cut them right back or should I cut them just below where they are broken? They are broken in a number of different places. Some down near the base of the plant and some just below the flowers.
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Liparis
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PostPosted: Wed Jun 24, 2009 3:49 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Just cut them below where it was broken and they should hopefully grow again, same with the ones that were completely broken by his big stupid clod-hoppers. They are perenial so have a good chance of recovering for next year.
Bill.

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catman
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PostPosted: Wed Jun 24, 2009 4:22 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks for that. Will let you know how it comes on!!!
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Sive
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PostPosted: Wed Jun 24, 2009 5:41 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hi Liparis, I know there are some types of foxgloves that are perennial, but aren't most of the common ones actually biennials? Or am I mistaken ?
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michael brenock
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PostPosted: Wed Jun 24, 2009 10:48 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

the wild foxglove is definitely a biennial there may be a cultivated perennial
michael brenock horticultural advisor (retired)
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Liparis
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PostPosted: Thu Jun 25, 2009 9:23 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Yes, sorry but I'm for ever making assumptions, a bad habit, i was assuming your foxgloves were cultivated forms.
Bill.

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