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Chard/spinach is bolting


 
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mor_rigan
Rank attained: Hazel Tree
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Joined: 26 May 2009
Posts: 6
Location: Kerry

PostPosted: Sat Jun 20, 2009 10:23 pm    Post subject: Chard/spinach is bolting Reply with quote

Is it just me or has anyone else noticed that Chard and Spinach are bolting just a couple of months after sowing. They are supposed to be biennial and not go to seed until next year.

I've never had this happen before so I'm blaming global warming. Is there anyone else out there with a similar problem and/or solution?

Cheers
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Liparis
Rank attained: Orchard owner


Joined: 23 Sep 2007
Posts: 651
Location: Co. Meath

PostPosted: Sun Jun 21, 2009 12:02 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I've only ever had that happen if I've sown them too early. I sow mid-May onwards.
Bill.

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verge
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Joined: 04 Jun 2006
Posts: 598
Location: Ireland

PostPosted: Sun Jun 21, 2009 12:06 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Chard and Spinach under stress tend to do that. My fairly safe guess is that the long hot period we got a while back combined with insufficient water may have caused it.
More of a chance if you are growing in a tunnel, glasshouse or in a raised bed.

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michael brenock
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PostPosted: Mon Jun 22, 2009 4:03 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I think bill is right, sowin too early is a major factor in bolting. You have plenty time to make another sowing.
michael brenock horticultural advisor (retired)
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mor_rigan
Rank attained: Hazel Tree
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PostPosted: Tue Jun 23, 2009 1:44 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks very much all. Perhaps I did sow too early. I'm just very disappointed to see my work bolt to the skies. I'll try some additional sowings!
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Liparis
Rank attained: Orchard owner


Joined: 23 Sep 2007
Posts: 651
Location: Co. Meath

PostPosted: Wed Jun 24, 2009 10:52 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

mor_rigan wrote:
...I'm just very disappointed to see my work bolt to the skies. I'll try some additional sowings!

Always remember, you put a lot of work into growing your veg. Sowing everything you need at once can cost you valuable crops and effort. Always sow in succession. Work out roughly what you use per week for each crop then sow seed etc to acheive that at weekly intervals.
Don't sow a 20' row of lettuce and produce about 40 plants, long before you've used 25% of the crop the rest will have bolted. Sow enough for 6 plants or so weekly or fortnightly. Same goes for your carrots. So in succession to get what baby carrots you need each week. Perhaps allowing your first, second or third sowing to grow on as mature roots for winter storage. Cabbage, cauli etc are done the same. This has the added benefit of securing another crop pretty quickly if one sowing fails for one reason or another.
Bill.

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