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Yellow griselinia


 
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Windyacre
Rank attained: Hazel Tree
Rank attained: Hazel Tree


Joined: 20 May 2009
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PostPosted: Fri Jun 19, 2009 6:14 pm    Post subject: Yellow griselinia Reply with quote

Hello all,

I moved about 20 griselinia plants (2 foot in height) about 2 months ago and there leaves are now all yellow. When I moved them I just transplanted them with some peatmoss and clay. They now look pretty poorly and may not survive. I was wondering do they need fertitliser like growmore or maybe just some miracle grow? any advice welcome.
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michael brenock
Rank attained: Chlorophyll for blood


Joined: 12 Aug 2008
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Location: cork

PostPosted: Fri Jun 19, 2009 7:52 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Two months ago was a bit late for safety. if all the plants are yellow leaved then it is stress related, the roots are not able to take up enough moisture because too many of them were damaged during the transplanting. Do not feed them with any feed now. Just give them plenty water and griselinia being robust will probably recover. Do not feed until the plants have fully recovered. Moss peat should have been wetted and mixed well with the soil. Check and see if the growing tip is brown, yellow or green. if it is green the the plant is safe. These plants might lose most of their leaves and yet survive but they will look leggy and may need to be cut back to half their height.
michael brenock horticultural advisor (retired)
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Liparis
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Joined: 23 Sep 2007
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Location: Co. Meath

PostPosted: Sat Jun 20, 2009 12:02 pm    Post subject: Re: Yellow griselinia Reply with quote

Windyacre wrote:
... When I moved them I just transplanted them with some peatmoss and clay.

Sometimes I'm filled wih horror at terms often used on here and it causes me confussion. I'm not trying to get everyone to change there terminogy and decriptions, but it does cause me enough concern to be wary of replying.
Mixing clay with peat to plant trees, shrubs etc makes me think disaster! However I've learnt from on here and people I give advice to locally, that the term clay is used to describe soil in general. Dirt seems to be another word I find used to describe the same thing. In gardening, clay is used to describe a sticky type of soil that very little will grow in and turns very solid when dry. We use clay to make crockery, cups vases etc. Dirt is used to describe a soil that is full of unwanted rubbish like too many stones and perhaps debri from buildings etc.
My confussion arises when people refer to having clay, because they use the term to refer to soil and clay, I'm never sure if they are refering to actual clay or soil.
Sorry, I'm not trying to be pedantic or anything, it just confuses me at times.
Bill.

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Windyacre
Rank attained: Hazel Tree
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Joined: 20 May 2009
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PostPosted: Sat Jun 20, 2009 10:02 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks Michael, the leaves are yellow all over including the tip. I will take your advice and just water them and see how they get on. If they are beyond saving I will just replace them, there is a garden center near me that has them potted at $2.95 each.
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michael brenock
Rank attained: Chlorophyll for blood


Joined: 12 Aug 2008
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PostPosted: Sun Jun 21, 2009 9:01 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Bill you are on the ball as usual, clay is a constituent part of soil and often people interchange them. silt and sand are also constituent pats but they are never used in the same fashion. When speaking to engineers soil has a different meaning. dont be afraid to put in your oar the space will be a lot duller without you
michael brenock
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michael brenock
Rank attained: Chlorophyll for blood


Joined: 12 Aug 2008
Posts: 1275
Location: cork

PostPosted: Sun Jun 21, 2009 9:06 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I should have stressed that if all the plants were affected then it is certainly stress related whereas if only a plant here and there i would suspect Phythopthora or Armilaria. there are other species worth trying like Viburnum. escallonia, Cotoneaster
Michael brenock horticultural advisor (retired)
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