Irish Gardeners Forum Home
 FAQFAQ   MemberlistMemberlist   UsergroupsUsergroups   RegisterRegister 
 ProfileProfile   Log in to check your private messagesLog in to check your private messages   Log inLog in 
Custom Search
   
Weather Report /
Moon Phase for Ireland

Post new topic   Reply to topic    Irish Gardeners Forum Home -> Irish Lawns and grass care

Eradicating Reeds


 
Most Recent Posts 2016 Vegetable quizz.
Last post: Greengage
At last! A garden joke. (except maybe it's not a joke!)
Last post: Sue Deacon
Skimmia seed wanted
Last post: Brendankearns
funny
Last post: tagwex
 
Visit TheGardenShop.ie
Author Message
ormondsview
Rank attained: Silver Birch Tree
Rank attained: Silver Birch Tree


Joined: 17 Jun 2009
Posts: 185
Location: Kenmare, Co. Kerry

PostPosted: Wed Jun 17, 2009 5:10 pm    Post subject: Eradicating Reeds Reply with quote

Our front lawn is mostly rock with grassy patches, a drain running from the top of the mountains and a smallish section of what may be a pond we hope to build at the front. As we are surrounded by pastures on 3 sides, reeds have come in to dominate the lawn area. It's near impossible to spade them out, cutting with a weeder doesn't get rid of the old growth. And the seeds last for years. Are there any small animals I could graze there that can eat these things?
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Liparis
Rank attained: Orchard owner


Joined: 23 Sep 2007
Posts: 651
Location: Co. Meath

PostPosted: Wed Jun 17, 2009 6:21 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I don't think there are any animals that eat reeds.
Bill.

_________________
Earth is the insane asylum of the Universe.

http://www.species-specific.com/orchid-forum/
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
Protein
Rank attained: Ash Tree
Rank attained: Ash Tree


Joined: 05 May 2009
Posts: 240
Location: Clare

PostPosted: Wed Jun 17, 2009 7:36 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Do weedkillers get rid of reeds?

I agree about not being able to get rid of them with the spade, you can dig forever.... and still not find the root.

me

_________________
"But no one puts flowers
On a flower's grave" - T Waits
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
inishindie
Rank attained: Tree plantation keeper


Joined: 27 May 2007
Posts: 563
Location: inishowen Ireland

PostPosted: Wed Jun 17, 2009 8:32 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hi

If you can get a machine to cut the reeds right back and then keep them down, they will eventually go. It doesn't get away from the fact that the ground is wet and there may be a drainage issue....A pig would dig out the roots and goats will nibble on the new reed shoots so there would be a way to keep things in check......Good luck....

Ian

_________________
if you are interested in raised vegetable beds and veggie growing I have a new website - raisedbeds.net We're busy on social networking too and have over 12,000 members in the group.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
ormondsview
Rank attained: Silver Birch Tree
Rank attained: Silver Birch Tree


Joined: 17 Jun 2009
Posts: 185
Location: Kenmare, Co. Kerry

PostPosted: Thu Jun 18, 2009 12:50 pm    Post subject: using a goat on tether Reply with quote

I think I would go for the goat on a tether as I'm also putting in shrubs. The acre is fully fenced, but I don't want free range due to tender perennials which some animals prefer to the reeds. Would lambs eat reeds selectively? Has anyone noticed that they are tasty to both goats and sheep? A farmer down the road would willingly take them back after the job is done.

I am opposed to any weed killer as our water system runs down to farm below.

Am worried about free range animals also eating lillies which I've learned in this space are toxic.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
James Kilkelly
Rank: Site Admin


Joined: 30 May 2006
Posts: 2142
Location: West of Ireland

PostPosted: Thu Jun 18, 2009 1:01 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Reeds and rushes are often called one and the same by some ormondsview.
Do you mean something like this.........



If so then there is loads of info in this previous thread......... RUSHES

_________________
Gardening books.

http://www.allotments.ie/ Ireland's allotments.
On Twitter... http://twitter.com/Allotments

Garden Consultation & Design.

Try my Garden Design home study course!
.
.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
JennyS
Rank attained: Rowan Tree
Rank attained: Rowan Tree


Joined: 30 Mar 2007
Posts: 125
Location: West Cork, Ireland

PostPosted: Thu Jun 18, 2009 11:49 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
I think I would go for the goat on a tether as I'm also putting in shrubs


With a drainage problem its not a good place to tether a goat - they're even more prone to foot-rot on damp ground than sheep are, and rushes aren't something animals like eating unless they're very hungry.
All animals prefer tender perennials to rushes - much more nutritious!

I had a damp patch of ground covered with rushes and got rid of them by mowing. I set the lawnmower on the highest setting to begin with and then gradually lowered the blades as the rushes gave up and grass had a chance to take over.
If your ground has drainage problems using a tractor for mowing will compact it even more, increasing the problem.

_________________
Irish wildflowers
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
ormondsview
Rank attained: Silver Birch Tree
Rank attained: Silver Birch Tree


Joined: 17 Jun 2009
Posts: 185
Location: Kenmare, Co. Kerry

PostPosted: Mon Jun 22, 2009 12:11 pm    Post subject: reeds and rushes removal Reply with quote

Thanks all for a good description of removal. There are many rocks outcropping amidst the patches so I'll use a gas powered weed wacker. I like the idea of composting the remains and can add to the job by putting some newspapers or cardboard beneath, then layering the green and on top of that some manure. This solution I've used before for periwinkle which I'll never plant again due to it's invasiveness. If I have wood chips, loam then I can cover it up with a mound and plant a heather or something. The plan was never to have an immaculate lawn sprayed heavily with phosphates but to find natural remedies only.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Display posts from previous:   
Post new topic   Reply to topic    Irish Gardeners Forum Home -> Irish Lawns and grass care All times are GMT
Page 1 of 1

 

Jump to:  
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum
You can attach files in this forum
You can download files in this forum


Powered by phpBB © 2001, 2005 phpBB Group

Privacy Policy | Copyright © 2006 - 2016 IrishGardeners.com (part of GardenPlansIreland.com)