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re potato spraying


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tagwex
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PostPosted: Wed Jun 21, 2017 9:00 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I have a double row of Queens quite by accident. It looks like a jungle now.
When sowing, using a tractor with the ding ding bell over the sowing pipes we inadvertently did two drills twice. What a crop per square metre that will be.

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mange tout
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PostPosted: Sat Jun 24, 2017 8:24 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Ate my first spuds this evening, Marabels, planted sometime around Paddy's day. Pretty good. A few small - medium sized ones and the rest baby potato sized. A little waxy and the boiled ones tasted a lot better than the steamed ones.

Anyone else eating yet?
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tagwex
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PostPosted: Sat Jun 24, 2017 8:27 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I'll have Queens in approx 1 month.
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Blowin
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PostPosted: Sun Jun 25, 2017 5:09 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

We had a couple of meals about a week ago, one Markies and one Desiree just to try them. We'll go back to them as soon as we've eaten the rest of the bought ones we already had.
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mange tout
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PostPosted: Sun Jun 25, 2017 6:41 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

What size were they blowin, i've desiree down too
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Blowin
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PostPosted: Mon Jun 26, 2017 4:25 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Roughly double hen's egg, if that makes any sense. Being Desiree, they will grow much bigger, I'm sure, but spuds always seem to attract slugs in my patch and they seem to like this variety. If yours aren't yet this big, don't forget we can be 2-3 weeks earlier here on the south coast.
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mange tout
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PostPosted: Wed Jul 12, 2017 7:24 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Can anyone tell me if this is blight? A few very small brown patches on leaves towards the back of the rows. Most of the crop (of a few different types, Maris piper, maris peer and two other types I can't remember now) are fine.

The yellow and brown leaves are lower down on the plant but it looks like they're just dying because of lack of sun due to the healthier leaves higher up, or am I being naive? Maybe its damper down there and more susceptible

https://www.dropbox.com/s/s5ywcorrdtwc7ks/20170711_213552.jpg?dl=0

https://www.dropbox.com/s/dyg5mop4y0p6i4a/20170711_213542.jpg?dl=0

https://www.dropbox.com/s/fvp28iubszt1roz/20170711_213547.jpg?dl=0
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tagwex
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PostPosted: Wed Jul 12, 2017 9:30 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Yellow spot at a guess. Blight will have a mould at the edge of the diseased part touching the healthy green part. Plus blight will be very quick at spreading. The whole crop will go brown within two days.
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mange tout
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PostPosted: Wed Jul 12, 2017 5:46 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Well thankfully no further progress of it today so maybe its benign
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Sue Deacon
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PostPosted: Wed Jul 12, 2017 10:18 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

mange tout wrote:
Well thankfully no further progress of it today so maybe its benign
It's to be hoped so. At this time of the season all my taters have a few leaves like that!
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Gautama
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PostPosted: Thu Jul 13, 2017 10:48 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

mange tout wrote:
Despite being planted earlier, my early spuds are much smaller plants above ground now than my second earlies or main crop ones. Is this normal?


It's not uncommon. Size would depend on variety, length of time in the ground, weather conditions and time of year.

mange tout wrote:
Do you ever really have to water spuds or do they benefit from it?

Size of potatoes and harvest benefit greatly from watering. I can't remember the figure but it's considerable. Joy Larson covers it in "Grow Your Own Vegetables"

mange tout wrote:
Finally, for baby spuds do you just pull them up early?


Yes.

Just a point maybe worth making, terms such as "earlies", "maincrop", etc refer to the amount of time the plant needs for the tubers to mature, rather than when to plant them. Foremost is an early variety because it'll crop after 8 weeks or thereabouts. Golden Wonder is a late maincrop because it'll still be producing tubers after 16 weeks.


If you plant your Foremost and GWs on the same day, the former will be mature in eight weeks or so, the latter in 16 weeks or so. This is regardless of whether they're planted in early March or late May (weather conditions permitting).

The handy thing about all this, is that if you want fresh potatoes for as long as possible, plant your first earlies, second earlies, early maincrop, maincrop and late maincrop on the same day then you'll have potatoes after 8, 10, 12, 14 and 16 weeks.

The tubers that mature fast don't keep. Because of this and their availability we eat them fresh and fast. The tubers that mature slowly do keep so we save them for last and also store them.

What I'd like to know is, earlies tend to be waxy and maincrop tend to be floury. Golden Wonder, the flouriest of them all, is a "late maincrop". Seems that with increased age is reduced moisture content.
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Blowin
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PostPosted: Thu Jul 13, 2017 12:15 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Just a follow up on 'waxy' v 'floury', I think you'll find it's the variety that determines which is which. Certainly Desiree is a maincrop for storing but is decidedly waxy and is a firm favourite in the UK. Over here the preference is for floury spuds and I've heard locals consider my Desirees as 'Bah! Like a bar of bloody soap.'
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Gautama
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PostPosted: Thu Jul 13, 2017 12:53 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

It is definitely down to the variety, most of all, but broadly speaking most earlies are waxy and most maincrop are floury.
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Gautama
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PostPosted: Thu Jul 13, 2017 12:57 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Blowin wrote:
'Bah! Like a bar of bloody soap.'


Soapy is a term I'd use differently. It's a spud gone wrong. Tends to have a wateryness about it, not just moisture.

There's such a thing as a good waxy potato (apparently), there's obviously such a thing as a good floury potato. There is no such thing as a good soapy potato.
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Sue Deacon
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PostPosted: Thu Jul 13, 2017 1:42 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Blowin - I love Desiree and Charlottes, can only stomach fluffy spuds when they are covered in butter. There I've said it! I can feel Irish hackles rising from here. Laughing
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