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Post new topic   Reply to topic    Irish Gardeners Forum Home -> Irelands Garden tools / equipment. (mowers, glasshouses & polytunnels etc).

Is this greenhouse good value?


 
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michelle M
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PostPosted: Sat May 09, 2009 11:24 am    Post subject: Is this greenhouse good value? Reply with quote

http://www.donedeal.ie/for-sale/gardening/884619

I'm not actually planning on buying one at the moment, but it looks like value to me. It is a flat pack price though. The details on it are on the sellers website, but the pic's on the website don't seem to work.
What does anyone else think?
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Liparis
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PostPosted: Sat May 09, 2009 1:25 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I'm confused with the price, is the 8 x 6 €1200 or €850 euro? It looks like the it is €85 but you could also read it €1200 so check it out.
A resonable price for a timber and Polycarb greenhouse, if it's Cedar. Check what it's made from, if it's just a softwood then I would want the timber framing to be more substantial than it looks.
Advantages, wood is warmer than aluminium, easier to fix things to when building staging, bubble lining etc. Less likely to twist and drop sheets of glass in high wind. disadvantages are a bit less light, but i find that unimportant. Aluminium frames can twist in wind and a pane of glass can pop out or break, then the wind gets inside and lifts the lot like balloon. I watched it happen years ago, it was terrifying. Once you get a slight twist in an aluminium frame it's never the same again. Glass just never seems to stay put afterwards. Polycarbonate is warm, is that one single, double or triple poly? It looks double, so you infact have the equivelant of double glazing, making it better. Polycarbonate is light, tough and durable. If storms hit it, it doesn't come out and become dangerous like glass, if it's fixed in properly. If kids are around, they won't cut themselves to shreds if they crash into it.
As a matter of interest, I built a 13' X 9' 6" timber and triple polycarbonate greenhouse for €400 buying 10' sheets from B & Q and timber I salvaged from various places, I love salvaging timber and reusing it. Because of the versatility of wood I keep just under 3,000 flowering sized orchids in it plus a few hundred seedlings.
Bill.

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jimmy mac
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PostPosted: Sat May 09, 2009 1:49 pm    Post subject: re greenhouse Reply with quote

Hi bill i would love to see a pic of your greenhouse .I am building one at the moment although it is going to cost a fair few euro it will be big 8m*6m.I reckon it wil be a lot cheaper than i could buy one that big .I am taking pics and i will post them all when finished
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Sive
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PostPosted: Sat May 09, 2009 2:08 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

HI Bill, I'd love some pictures of what sounds like a fantastic greenhouse Do you think your design would be good for a very windy site? I like the sound of polycarbonate, but would it get blown away more easily?
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michelle M
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PostPosted: Sat May 09, 2009 2:13 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I think it's a 14 x 8 aluminium frame, double polycarbonate for €850. And a timber frame 8 x 6 for €1200.
At least thats the way I took it up. I think I'll definately stay away from the aluminium frame now. I'd like to see the pic's of ye're greenhouses too. Might be a project for the future. A few more raised beds are first on my list of priorities.
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Liparis
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PostPosted: Sat May 09, 2009 3:03 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I'll take some pictures and post. I've since (about 3 years ago) put up a lean-to along the side which is narrower at around 8' wide. I use that mainly as a quarrantine house for plants arriving from Thailand etc, then as a cold house for acclimatising to cooler temps.
Mine is situated in an area with a Sycamore tree (Acer pseudoplatanus) to the fore, Sycamore hedging to the rear and then 30' of open ground to a hawthorn (Crataegus monogyna) hedge, so winds don't normally bother it, except last winter when the gales came out of the south and ripped the door open in the middle of the night. My greenhouses always run north to south to reduce direct sun in the summer. The main greenhouse is half-clad (timber up to staging height then glazed up from there. I make my own timber lathe frames to fix on top to cut out direct sunshine, so while these are on, it looks a bit mad. They just screw in place and easily removed in autumn.
Sive, if you fix the polycarbonate secure, it shouldn't blow away. You can buy special fixing screws. I drop the sheets into rebates and fix with a lathe down each edge and one in the middle across the way. Also, I wouldn't call it fantastic, but for my uses it's more practical than I could buy.
Jimmy mac, you'll save an absolute fortune building one yourself, especially that size. I want to build a huge one, tall as well as large footprint, it will be a display house showing the plants growing as if in a rainforest. The cheapest price I could find to buy one was €30,000. I reckon I could build it for around €2,000 it will take a lot of time gathering wood etc, then building it, but it will probably function extremely well. Won't be this year though.
I'll post pictures later.
Bill.

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jimmy mac
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PostPosted: Sat May 09, 2009 3:37 pm    Post subject: re greenhouse Reply with quote

Bill I have concrete slab in now and 2 rows of 9inch blocks allround.I have all my windows and i am going to get steel frames made up to slide the windows into and then the roof .I am going to try to keep costs under 2k all in but it will be a solid structure and it wont be moving.I reckon ill have space for a table and chairs and loads of raised planters with a great view of hills on 3 sides.The plan then is to get rid of the tv watching and i reckon this greenhouse wil the best used room in the house.Were looking forward to seeing pics of your greenhouse and I would love if all wh can would post greenhouse pics as they are a great source of info for forthcoming projects rgds
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Liparis
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PostPosted: Sat May 09, 2009 7:25 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Here she is, looking weather beaten, but the wood is still very sound. Front Entrances from the south.




The greenhouses are sitting on 6" X 9" timbers soaked in preservative. these are anchored to the ground by 2" X 2" driven 2.5' into the ground and bolted to the base. One at either end of the timber and one in the middle, this makes a no-movement base. Uprights and roof timbers are made of 3" X 2" the polycarbonate sheets are put in place and sealed with silicone sealer, then lathes run down the edges, again, sealed with silicone and then screwed in place. I bought the polycarbonate from B&Q for €35.00 per sheet, there was a 15% discount came off that price as they were having a sale on DIY products at the time. I'm not sure how much it costs today. There are several types starting at the one I use going up to about €80 per sheet, I think.

I've removed most of the lathe shades for the pictures.



They took about two weeks to build. I reclaimed a whole lot of 16' lengths of 6" x 4" which were going to be dumped Shocked so I managed to beg it for free. I run it all through an old bench saw I have and use the timber rough-sawn. I have enough left to build another two greenhouses when I can afford the polycarbonate, or build my big display house.


Looking in the door towards the west side of the greenhouse.


Looking from the north end of the greenhouse to the southwest


Looking from the north end to the southeast


And essential to me and also most types of greenhouse, the 18" fan is blasting air around 24 hrs per day, enough to make the plants foliage move in a strong breeze. it's mounted right up in the ridge at the north end and pointing down at an angle to the floor at the door. It runs 12 months of the year and has the added advantage of recycling warm air which would usually be lost up in the ridge and considerably reduces my heating bill.


Usually this amount of air movement isn't needed in a greenhouse growing most things, but I'm aiming for dappled light at the brightest and down to full shade, coupled with humidity of around 80% - 90% RH high air movement is crucial to mimic the same conditions in the rainforest, also it's important not to be opening vents and doors on sunny days and lose that vital humidity. The only time I open a door is to go in or out, with damping down, soaking the plants and the proper use of shading I keep humidity up temperatures stable at a maximum of 85f during the day and 65f at night. Use of the fan helps me maintain a minimum of 60f at night in the winter for a reasonable cost.
I've had 6 years out of the main greehouse and with regular preserving with cuprinol clear every two years, I reckon it has at least another 10 or 12 years before I need to be looking at timber maintenance.

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michelle M
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PostPosted: Sun May 10, 2009 4:51 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

That looks great- looks like huge work went into it. The best part is the fact of building it to suit your own requirements. Great use of space with plants everywhere
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James Kilkelly
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PostPosted: Sun May 10, 2009 5:05 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Nice to see Liparis. Smile
Brings me back to my time in the botanic gardens and rambles through the orchid house.

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Liparis
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PostPosted: Sun May 10, 2009 5:51 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

michelle M wrote:
The best part is the fact of building it to suit your own requirements. Great use of space with plants everywhere

No working from plans, just a basic frame to the basic shape and size I wanted then tailored to my requirements, it removes the limitations of a bought one one which wouldn't be nearly as high as I needed for long, trailing plants.
Bill.

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