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Rabbit proof Allotment


 
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paddy mac fisto
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PostPosted: Thu Apr 30, 2009 2:31 pm    Post subject: Rabbit proof Allotment Reply with quote

We've had a few rabbit invasions down on the plot. Pretty much anyone with cabbages out is now "sans cabbages". I know a good fence partially buried and bent into an "L" shape under the soil is the best solution but anyone have any "no cost" solutions? I see dog hair could be the trick. Anyone ever tried it?
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PostPosted: Sat May 16, 2009 6:01 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Perhaps you need to call this guy
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galwaybeginner
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PostPosted: Sun May 17, 2009 10:59 pm    Post subject: Re: Rabbit proof Allotment Reply with quote

paddy mac fisto wrote:
We've had a few rabbit invasions down on the plot. Pretty much anyone with cabbages out is now "sans cabbages". I know a good fence partially buried and bent into an "L" shape under the soil is the best solution but anyone have any "no cost" solutions? I see dog hair could be the trick. Anyone ever tried it?


I've heard dog hair as well as cat hair. Not sure how you feel about chemicals (personally against them) but you can use anything with the chemical Thiram in it to get rid of them. Non lethal, they just don't like it. You get it in a lot of fungicides.

I've heard that you can get a replant in garden stores (although never seen it myself) and this probably just contains thiram.

One definite solution is fox urine, but it is quite expensive (yes, in this strange world of ours you can buy yourself some fox urine!). It is available from sports stores (of the hunting kind).

Best of luck!
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paddy mac fisto
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PostPosted: Mon May 18, 2009 8:43 am    Post subject: Sans cabbages Reply with quote

I went for it last week and put out some cabbage plants. Down at the allotment last night and they're completely gone. I have yet to get enough dog hair, I've been asking anyone with a dog to keep the hair for me as I have more cabbages started at home and want to plant them out in a few weeks. It's hard to understand how these furry pests work though. The plot next to me has oodles of cabbages and they're completely untouched. Maybe he put some of that Thiram down. Chemicals are not for me I'm afraid, i'll have to try the dog hair in the next while. We'll find out soon enough.
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galwaybeginner
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PostPosted: Mon May 18, 2009 8:52 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Sorry to hear that. What a pain!

Glad you're not going the chemical route. I just had to say to let you know the solution was there.

Human (male) urine is meant to scare off some animals. Not sure if it works for rabbits, but won't cost anything so may be worth a try.

I got curious about it before and tried to find out why urine was a deterrent and apparently it is because of the testosterone - shows a larger males territorial markings. It was for cats I was wondering so might not work for rabbits.
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paddy mac fisto
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PostPosted: Mon May 18, 2009 9:02 am    Post subject: Sans cabbages Reply with quote

Well I'm not too browned off about the cabbages, at least I learned something out of it. I think that's what going the organic route is all about really. Once you get your head around that you're going to lose some of your crop to pesky beasties it makes it that bit easier to plan for them. The marigolds are almost ready to go down there so they'll bring in a splash of colour and a few nice pollinators that should keep the pests at bay. Nicer than chemicals anyway.
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paddy mac fisto
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PostPosted: Tue May 19, 2009 10:28 am    Post subject: Allotment pics Reply with quote

A few pics to show how open the plot is. Really need to get this sorted. Fencing is so bloody expensive. I'm wondering with the construction downturn would any of those nice developers miss a couple of rolls of that lovely orange plastic safety mesh they use...?

These pics are 2 weeks old now, it's A LOT muddier at the moment. Early potatoes are flying now and need to be earthed up this weekend. Just got a mail from one of my fellow allotmenteers about a blight warning so i'll be down later with the bread soda.



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galwaybeginner
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PostPosted: Tue May 19, 2009 10:35 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Pretty exposed alright, and very large to be fencing in.

Are the nets protecting the stuff under them, or are they being attacked too?
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paddy mac fisto
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PostPosted: Tue May 19, 2009 10:45 am    Post subject: Nets Reply with quote

Nothing has been touched in the raised beds, the cabbages that were under the net are all gone though. There are some turnips in under there too but they seem to be doing OK. The nets were primarily to stop the pigeons getting at the seedlings. They made mincemeat out of my peas. I'm in dire need of more netting as the parts of the plot that look like they have nothing in them are now dug over and have spinach, beetroot, chard, and the last of the turnips in. There's also a bed reserved for the pumpkins and squashes and i've got more cabbages leeks and celery started off at home and waiting to go in soon. Finding it hard to source a big roll of netting. Found small quantities in Johnstons in Naas but i'd love to get my hands on a big roll of it cos I know I'm going to need it every year. I've heard rumours of a co-op in Kilcock but i've never passed it, i'll have to do a bit of driving around looking lost this weekend... Sad
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galwaybeginner
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PostPosted: Tue May 19, 2009 10:55 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Wish I could advise, but nothing out this side of the country would be much help.

You may be on to something with the builders netting. Althigh may be hard to secure (so rabbits can't just go under).
Maybe try asing foreman on a couple of sites. A couple of quid in hand could read a nice long net Wink
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paddy mac fisto
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PostPosted: Tue May 19, 2009 11:20 am    Post subject: plastic fence Reply with quote

Ah it'd probably only be a stopgap. It'd be fairly easy for one of the little fluffy so and so's to chew through. Even if it was buried. I'll need something a bit more substantial eventually methinks. The ould "airgead" is scarce for the next while though.
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PostPosted: Sat May 23, 2009 7:02 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Paddy
I think the stuff you are looking for is debris netting, it is used to cover scaffolding to stop things falling off. The best places to try would be builders merchants, or scaffolding firms who may have some used netting.
There are plenty of internet sites in UK that supply it in various widths and colours, it averages about £32 for a 2x50M roll. Don't think it would be difficult to find a supplier in Ireland. There must be square miles of the stuff on allotment sites all over UK,it keeps out pigeons,cabbage whites root fly, and I think if you were to bury the edges around your beds it might deter the rabbits as well.
I was reading on another garden website about a allotmenteer who has a couple of authentic looking rubber snakes lying about on his beds and is never bothered by furry or feathered pests, although Irish rabbits may not know what a snake looks like
Your allotment looks great ,huge, compared with mine, and very tidy.
Good Luck with the pest control
Jock

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Liparis
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PostPosted: Sun May 24, 2009 11:19 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I've heard that those artificial owls and birds of prey make good deterents, unfortunately they deter the kind of wildlife we need around the garden, maybe artificial snakes would have the same effect?
Bill.

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