Irish Gardeners Forum Home
 FAQFAQ   MemberlistMemberlist   UsergroupsUsergroups   RegisterRegister 
 ProfileProfile   Log in to check your private messagesLog in to check your private messages   Log inLog in 
Custom Search
   
Weather Report /
Moon Phase for Ireland

Post new topic   Reply to topic    Irish Gardeners Forum Home -> Vegetable growing, fruit and allotments in Ireland

Too late to plant Parsnips from seed?


Goto page Previous  1, 2  
Most Recent Posts Brexit
Last post: Blowin
Garden Visits.
Last post: tagwex
Is planting a laurel hedge bad for Irish Environment
Last post: tagwex
What are you planting now?
Last post: Greengage
 
Visit TheGardenShop.ie
Author Message
Corylus avellana
Rank attained: Hazel Tree
Rank attained: Hazel Tree


Joined: 19 Aug 2008
Posts: 5

PostPosted: Tue May 12, 2009 10:47 am    Post subject: Protecting carrots from carrot fly Reply with quote

A good way of protecting carrots (and I would guess parsnips too) from carrot fly is to construct a 'wall' of fleece around the bed, about 2 feet high should do it. Just use bamboos or other sticks to hold it up. A row of onions all around the edge of the bed can work too - a kind of companion planting.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
walltoall
Rank attained: Orchard owner


Joined: 25 Aug 2008
Posts: 706
Location: Thurrock RM15 via Dungarvan and the Banner County

PostPosted: Tue May 12, 2009 11:00 am    Post subject: tall parsnips and low flies Reply with quote

There seems to be a concensus that, apart from a physical barrier of fleece, a chemical barrier of onions, to stop the carrot fly getting at the parsnips, one can use the knowledge that carrot fly stay very close to ground level. Might I take it then that my raised beds some of which have 2ft sides would ensure the blighters could not get mine?

On the same subject but a different tack, is carrot fly endemic (there all the time) or is it brought in by cultivation of a suitable crop? Eg. I never had a white butterfly til I planted cabbage and as soon as it came up they arrived in droves. Do carrot fly use the same system?

_________________
Retired trouble-maker. twitters @walltoall and dreams of being promoted to Pedunculate Oaker.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
sweetpea
Rank attained: Hazel Tree
Rank attained: Hazel Tree


Joined: 05 Mar 2009
Posts: 28

PostPosted: Tue May 12, 2009 12:32 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Exactly what do you mean bu fleece and where do i buy it?????
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
sharonl
Rank attained: Hawthorn Tree
Rank attained: Hawthorn Tree


Joined: 24 Mar 2009
Posts: 69
Location: Dublin

PostPosted: Tue May 12, 2009 2:23 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

You can buy horticultural fleece in most garden centres, I got some in Johnstown garden centre near naas and have also seen it in Woodies DIY. I built a carrot fly barrier last weekend around my carrots and parsnips but unfortunately it doesn't last very well in high winds like we had last week and promptly blew down and got destroyed Sad so if your spot isn't very sheltered make sure you secure it really well but even then it rips very easily. Mine just ripped right off the nails, so I've resorted to interplanting with spring onions and surrounding the bed with chives and will hope for the best.

sharon

_________________
Sharon
www.plot103.blogspot.com
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
michael brenock
Rank attained: Chlorophyll for blood


Joined: 12 Aug 2008
Posts: 1275
Location: cork

PostPosted: Fri May 15, 2009 9:07 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

grow the parsnips on ground where no arrots or parsnips were grown for the past 3-4 years or at least south west of where they were grown before. The carrot fly may not kill the parsnips but will damage them. it is possible you escaped the ravages of the pests because of your isolation but the pests and diseases will gradually catch up on you, just when you thought you have controlled one then another one appears, every year is different and all these pests are opportunists depending on weather and a host crop, you have to outsmart these but with experience you will manage and some pests are minor enough to be ignored. others have done it and so will you.
michael brenock horticultural advisor (retired)
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Display posts from previous:   
Post new topic   Reply to topic    Irish Gardeners Forum Home -> Vegetable growing, fruit and allotments in Ireland All times are GMT
Goto page Previous  1, 2
Page 2 of 2

 

Jump to:  
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum
You can attach files in this forum
You can download files in this forum


Powered by phpBB © 2001, 2005 phpBB Group

Privacy Policy | Copyright © 2006 - present IrishGardeners.com (part of GardenPlansIreland.com)