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Post new topic   Reply to topic    Irish Gardeners Forum Home -> Shrubs in Ireland ... Hedging in Ireland

What would be the best boundary hedge to plant in shady area


 
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red robin
Rank attained: Hazel Tree
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Joined: 21 Apr 2009
Posts: 12
Location: athlone

PostPosted: Tue Apr 21, 2009 10:42 pm    Post subject: What would be the best boundary hedge to plant in shady area Reply with quote

About 3 years ago we planted laurel as a border hedge between ourselves and next door neighbours. It took very well at the front of the house on boundary line.It is about 5 foot high.
However the boundary line between ourselves and our neighbour has not taken so well. Our neighbours house is about 1metre from the hedge meaning it does not get much sun and it is only about 1 foot high and very poor looking. We have tried feeding and watering regularly. The kids also jump over here no matter how often we ask them not too.
I have lost patience we really want our privacy here so I was thinking of buying mature hedging a couple of feet high. It is about 5 metres in length to cover and will then meet up with the front hedging.
What would be the best hedge to plant. I am thinking along the lines of conifer.
I need instant privacy we were hoping to make it into a patio area.
Any advice welcome please....
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walltoall
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Location: Thurrock RM15 via Dungarvan and the Banner County

PostPosted: Wed Apr 22, 2009 6:46 am    Post subject: Is the red-red-robin not bob-bob-bobbing along Reply with quote

Please Red Robin, consider your situation carefully. Here in merry England the most acrimonious litigation is between warring neighbours with conifer boundaries. English people habitually fail or refuse to connect with their fellow man and want their 'privacy'. I lved in Ireland for almost sixty years where people connect as a matter of culture and history. I lived near Athlone in the dying days of the last century and found the people to be very laid back, friendly and helpful in my case certainly not the type of people I would want to hide from behind an impenetrable hedge. Having said that I lived just across the Offaly border in Doon and my nearest neighbour was a quarter of a mile away.

I know the Celtic Tiger has crapped all over Irish Culture and 'wealth' made many Irish people go savage. There's been a huge influx of people to Ireland of all nationalities and cultures but mostly they have integrated marvellously with the natives. Your cry for help is heard here in Essex and I am worried for you. As for your specific enquiry, it is very difficult to give a gardening answer.

There are fully grown 'cypress' type evergreens at my local garden centre which are about six foot tall and in pots. They are very dense and compact, each one having a spread of about three foot. 15 to 20 of these would give instant privacy and no worries as to whether they were right for the site. However I see two problems. If the next-door children are savage they will still be able to knock over the pots unless they (the pots not the brats) are firmly attached to terra firma. The other 'problem' are that these potted 'trees' are £50+ per unit. You are looking at £2000 quid maybe €2500 for questionable privacy. A boundary wall I built last year and which by co-incidence is about 5metres long and 2metres high, cost £7000 all found.

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Sive
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PostPosted: Wed Apr 22, 2009 7:56 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

How about a totally different idea.....woven willow panels would give you total privacy and you could plant up against them for more long-term greenery. Have a look in your garden centre, they can be very attractive when used in the right place.
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walltoall
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PostPosted: Wed Apr 22, 2009 8:28 pm    Post subject: willow creels, hurdles and wattles Reply with quote

Grand idea Sive I'd second that.
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red robin
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PostPosted: Fri Apr 24, 2009 9:40 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks for the replies. I am not too keen on the woven willow panels as we live in a country area on a country road and the panels would not look right as all the neighbours here have different sorts of hedging including lalandi keeping it at 6 foot.
I called into a garden centre and asked for advice. He recommended a yellow conifer called yvonne. It grows about one and a half foot a year and is already five foot high. I will only need about 6 to cover 6 metres the price is 15 euro which is quite reasonable. I would keep it at a height of 6 foot. I may go with them.

Thanks all
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James Kilkelly
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PostPosted: Sat Apr 25, 2009 1:39 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

red robin wrote:

I called into a garden centre and asked for advice. He recommended a yellow conifer called yvonne. It grows about one and a half foot a year and is already five foot high. I will only need about 6 to cover 6 metres the price is 15 euro which is quite reasonable. I would keep it at a height of 6 foot. I may go with them.



I don't want to be the bearer of bad news red robin, but growth about one and a half foot a year and a lovely yellow colour are two things you will not be getting from this conifer in your location.
Here's a link that shows a bit more.. Yvonne
Plus it wont bounce back from kid damage too well either.

Semi mature specimens of Berberis darwinii hedging may be more your line
Vigorous, evergreen, spiny, dark green leaves, dark orange flowers in mid- and late spring, followed by round, blue-black fruit.
Suitable for Partial Shade as well.
It's not the best boundary hedge to plant in shady area, but it may be the best for your situation.
Let me know how you get on. Wink


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walltoall
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Location: Thurrock RM15 via Dungarvan and the Banner County

PostPosted: Sat Apr 25, 2009 7:30 am    Post subject: keeping the peace and the neighbours at bay Reply with quote

I'll second that, GPI. The Darwin Berberis repels kids and cows and looks stunning when established. Might I also suggest, RedRobin, that you put in some sort of wire fence, netted or stretched to prevent trespass and to support any hedging for the first two or three years. Also since there is only a metre of space between you and next door, do they use that metre as a walk past? If yes, factor in to your plans that all plants grow outwards in all directions. You can clip or prune on your own side but if you plant close to a boundary you can only get at the other side by permission. Whatever sticks into the neighbours space is 'trespassing' The willow divider proposed by Sive prevents that problem! Think outside the box while you figure your solution.
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red robin
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PostPosted: Tue May 19, 2009 11:06 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Just like to update that the laurel hedge has come on great in the last couple of weeks. I cleared out weeds and grass under the hedge and put down some chicken manure in April. I have fed it every two weeks sometimes with tomato feed and it has come on great. It is almost 5 foot high now . I was only short of talking to it. Glad now I didnt pull it up. Razz
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michael brenock
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PostPosted: Wed May 20, 2009 8:16 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

berberis darwinii is an excellent choice,is stock proof and child proof evergreen and responds well to clipping and able to bear shade or try berberis stenophylla, but remember the children will grow up and the hedge will grow undisturbed. All hedges must be trimmed back in height and width, remember if it grows fast it becomes established fast but has to be cut back more often.cotoneaster lacteus or viburnum tinus are worth considering.
michael brenock horticultural advisor (retired)
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