Irish Gardeners Forum Home
 FAQFAQ   MemberlistMemberlist   UsergroupsUsergroups   RegisterRegister 
 ProfileProfile   Log in to check your private messagesLog in to check your private messages   Log inLog in 
Custom Search
   
Weather Report /
Moon Phase for Ireland

Post new topic   Reply to topic    Irish Gardeners Forum Home -> Irish Lawns and grass care

Moss in the lawn


 
Most Recent Posts Garlic problem
Last post: corkgardener
Introduce yoursellf to whom.......................
Last post: Keeks
I'm new here
Last post: tagwex
Hi, guy here trying to grow stuff in a tunnel
Last post: Greengage
 
Visit TheGardenShop.ie
Author Message
ace
Rank attained: Hazel Tree
Rank attained: Hazel Tree


Joined: 08 Aug 2008
Posts: 10

PostPosted: Mon Apr 20, 2009 9:44 am    Post subject: Moss in the lawn Reply with quote

I have got a lot of moss growing in the lawn and have purchased a product called De-Moss (Sulphate of Iron) but I am concerned about the birds I try to attract to my garden.
There is a warning not to use near pets and would rather keep the moss than chance poisoning the birds.
Any ideas anyone?
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
walltoall
Rank attained: Orchard owner


Joined: 25 Aug 2008
Posts: 705
Location: Thurrock RM15 via Dungarvan and the Banner County

PostPosted: Mon Apr 20, 2009 10:11 am    Post subject: feeding elephants with pharmacutical iron by the ton Reply with quote

Moss is an indication of bad drainage, lack of sunlight and/or compacted soil and there are many threads on this forum discussing moss. Twisted Evil

Ferrous Sulphate applied as a dissolved salt will kill moss while having no effect on grass. The raw material is very toxic if eaten by children or dogs, both of which might be stupid enough to try it as it looks like sugar! Sad If you dissolve the stuff in your watering can and keep the box away from children and dogs you'll be alright. When you spray the lawn the moss will go black within a day or two and die off within a fortnight. If you broadcast grass seed across the whole lawn you might be lucky enough to improve the lawn but I doubt it. Moss killers have no effect whatever on birds, although there is an outside chance that some of them may try to use the dead moss for nest building. Exclamation

http://www.elephantcare.org/Drugs/ferrouss.htm is a link which is both infomative and confusing unless you are into pharmacology. Rolling Eyes

_________________
Retired trouble-maker. twitters @walltoall and dreams of being promoted to Pedunculate Oaker.


Last edited by walltoall on Tue Apr 21, 2009 7:26 am; edited 1 time in total
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
birdie
Rank attained: Rowan Tree
Rank attained: Rowan Tree


Joined: 16 Jun 2006
Posts: 146
Location: west of ireland

PostPosted: Mon Apr 20, 2009 10:39 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I agree with walltoall. I love birds and would hate to see someting I apply to my lawn hurt my birds, but I applied iron and they were not affected. I did read somewhere, maybe here, that the sulphate of iron is not good for the worms in your lawn though.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
corfiot
Rank attained: Hawthorn Tree
Rank attained: Hawthorn Tree


Joined: 04 Jun 2008
Posts: 53
Location: ballaghaderreen-roscommon

PostPosted: Mon Apr 20, 2009 6:21 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I have more moss this year than ever before on my lawns,a good raking of the moss is needed and try not to cut too short when mowing.I think it is down to the very wet periods that we have had??
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
walltoall
Rank attained: Orchard owner


Joined: 25 Aug 2008
Posts: 705
Location: Thurrock RM15 via Dungarvan and the Banner County

PostPosted: Tue Apr 21, 2009 7:25 am    Post subject: On the mossy banks of the verdant braes Reply with quote

Birdie. Thanks for the note on the worms. You are quite correct. Worms injest the sulphate in their diets as they go about their work aerating the soil. Worms are the gardener's best friends but the few worms that are working where the moss is are expendable, don't you think? Let's face it though the wums are a means to our ends and if we need a grass lawn and can't live with any moss, iron does the job. Personally I live with the bits of moss I have and concentrate instead on keeping the grassy areas clear of daisies and dandelions.

Hello Corfiot. We got buckets of rain in Essex this Spring. But the same areas of my patch have the same amount of moss as every year. In my garden it's down to extremely clayey soil and lack of sunlight. I could prevent one bit of moss thriving by knocking down the garage I spose, but then my white currants would lose their best asset and my climbing hydrangea would have nowhere to hang. I guess I'm part of the live and let live brigade?

_________________
Retired trouble-maker. twitters @walltoall and dreams of being promoted to Pedunculate Oaker.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
Sean Ph'lib
Rank attained: Ash Tree
Rank attained: Ash Tree


Joined: 11 Dec 2008
Posts: 200
Location: Co Kerry

PostPosted: Tue Apr 21, 2009 8:07 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I know it's not an option for everyone, but my lawn is completely moss-free thanks to my flock of free-range hens; their constant scraping and manuring of the lawn has produced the thickest, healthiest sward I've ever seen - and without chemicals of any kind. One result is scores of blackbirds, thrushes, robins, starlings etc. probing all day for the (un-sulphated) worms. Smile
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
walltoall
Rank attained: Orchard owner


Joined: 25 Aug 2008
Posts: 705
Location: Thurrock RM15 via Dungarvan and the Banner County

PostPosted: Tue Apr 21, 2009 8:18 am    Post subject: Now here's what you call a proper gardener Reply with quote

Seán Your blood is worth bottling. You always hit the nail on the head! You wouldn't be from the kingdom now would you? And may your hens lay lots of double yolks for ya.
_________________
Retired trouble-maker. twitters @walltoall and dreams of being promoted to Pedunculate Oaker.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
Sean Ph'lib
Rank attained: Ash Tree
Rank attained: Ash Tree


Joined: 11 Dec 2008
Posts: 200
Location: Co Kerry

PostPosted: Tue Apr 21, 2009 11:54 am    Post subject: Re: Now here's what you call a proper gardener Reply with quote

walltoall wrote:
Seán Your blood is worth bottling. You always hit the nail on the head! You wouldn't be from the kingdom now would you? And may your hens lay lots of double yolks for ya.

It probably is worth bottling: it's 90% home-brewed beer and cider! Laughing
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
michael brenock
Rank attained: Chlorophyll for blood


Joined: 12 Aug 2008
Posts: 1275
Location: cork

PostPosted: Thu May 14, 2009 8:28 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

moss grows in poor drainage and shade. another two factors that contribute to its presence are low fertility and it's ability to grow the whole year round while the grass is at a standstill in the winter, mosses and there are many types can tolerate acid and alkaline soils. Wire rake off the moss, feed it including Sulphate of iron and spiking will help. Applying chemicals to get rid of the symptoms is a useless exercise, you must get to the" root" of the problem.
michael brenock horticultural advisor (retired)
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Display posts from previous:   
Post new topic   Reply to topic    Irish Gardeners Forum Home -> Irish Lawns and grass care All times are GMT
Page 1 of 1

 

Jump to:  
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum
You can attach files in this forum
You can download files in this forum


Powered by phpBB © 2001, 2005 phpBB Group

Privacy Policy | Copyright © 2006 - 2016 IrishGardeners.com (part of GardenPlansIreland.com)