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The three sisters?


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foxroxks
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PostPosted: Sun Apr 19, 2009 7:46 pm    Post subject: The three sisters? Reply with quote

I've just added an additional plot (10ft x 9ft) to my patch . Its a plot I am planning to use for corn. I'm trying out companion planting this year & am just wondering is 10 x 9 too small to trying the three sisters in? should i just stick to the corn?

I'm attaching a pic of the space.



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Sean Ph'lib
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PostPosted: Sun Apr 19, 2009 9:12 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

What are the three sisters? Incidentally, is your block wall a bit out of plumb?
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foxroxks
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PostPosted: Mon Apr 20, 2009 7:42 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Its growing corn beans + squash in the one plot. beans grow up the corn & the squash provides ground cover. Just wondering if the plot is too small for it to work.

Wall is grand its the camera angle Laughing
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Liparis
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PostPosted: Mon Apr 20, 2009 8:21 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I've never heard of this before. I see the benefits of growing peas or beans with the sweetcorn, but I would have thought that squash being hungry feeders would battle the hungry sweetcorn for food. But, maybe the squash isn't such a heavy feeder as I always imagined, I've never grown it. The way sweetcorn is grown, it shouldn't really need ground cover surely?
Bill.

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Michael196
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PostPosted: Mon Apr 20, 2009 9:30 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Liparis

Please try butternut squash for yourself,

it bursts out of the ground, ( I cannot say anymore as I havent got beyond that so far !!!) but mixed with carrots and parsnips its absolutly delicious, . Ever noticed that extra vegtable served with roasted carrots and parsnips at restaurants , looks like an off color parsnip ? thats butternut squash. do your self ac ulinary favour and grow some. They are quites expsenive too at 3-4 euro in the shops. so good savings.

I was shcoked to hear my better half spent 2 euro for 2 parsnip in tescos yesterday. wow.
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Liparis
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PostPosted: Mon Apr 20, 2009 1:58 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

OK, you've talked me into it, I'll give em a go if I can find the seeds. I was toying with the idea the last year or two, but you've convinced me. I assume the same cultivation as marrow and Courgette?
What's a restaurant? Laughing

Michael196 wrote:
Liparis
I was shcoked to hear my better half spent 2 euro for 2 parsnip in tescos yesterday. wow.

Shocked My God! I've just been down the parsnip plot and did some counting up, I should be worth two or three million when these parsnips are ready Laughing Laughing
Bill.

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foxroxks
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PostPosted: Mon Apr 20, 2009 2:40 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Here is how it is meant to work:

"a simple but profound example of companion planting. The three plants are companions; they help each other by maximizing growing conditions for one another. The corn, tall and firm, grows in the center of a circular bed and serves as a support for climbing pole beans. The beans fix nitrogen in the soil, important for nitrogen loving, heavy feeding corn. The squash surrounds the corn and beans and covers the ground, serving to hold moisture in the soil, and the prickles on squash stems act as repellant to pests"



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PostPosted: Mon Apr 20, 2009 7:35 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Corn is to be plated at least 150mm (6 inch) apart and the rows is to be 600mm (2 foot) apart. The space required for proper root development is quite large. The Pumpkin (squash) vines require a fair amount of space, but there is no roots. you would plant the squash in very rich soil - pure manure yielded the best crop I have ever grown. The corn stalks is a handy stalk for the beens (or peas) and the beens supplys the nitrogen
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Michael196
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PostPosted: Mon Apr 20, 2009 9:53 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hi Liparis,

yep same cultivation as marrow and courgete......
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PostPosted: Tue Apr 21, 2009 6:18 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Butternuts are freely available from fruit and vegetable shops at present. They are very nice when boiled up, the excess water drained and then dished up as a normal serving of vegetable. We would also half the butternut, take out the pips and bake it for about 20 minutes at 200C. Spoon some sweet corn into the hollow left by the pips and bake it for a further 20 minutes - DELICIOUS.

My wife makes a beautiful fritter with the butternuts. This is served with a caramel sauce. The sweet with savoury meets and potatoes works well for me.
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foxroxks
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PostPosted: Tue Apr 21, 2009 7:45 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

any suggestions for the tastiest variety of butternut squash
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foxroxks
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PostPosted: Thu Apr 23, 2009 8:31 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Import wrote:
Corn is to be plated at least 150mm (6 inch) apart and the rows is to be 600mm (2 foot) apart. The space required for proper root development is quite large. The Pumpkin (squash) vines require a fair amount of space, but there is no roots. you would plant the squash in very rich soil - pure manure yielded the best crop I have ever grown. The corn stalks is a handy stalk for the beens (or peas) and the beens supplys the nitrogen



Ive decided to give this a go. Ive worked out my spacing etc for the corn & I should have plenty for my needs. I have few more questions.

1. should I leave a 1ft border around the corn & beans for the squash
2. how many bean/pea plants to a corn would you recommend
3 I was planning to use butternut squash but dont have a need to completely surround the plot with it. would it be ok to use butternut squash on one side, pumpkin another , courgette on another & am open to a suggestion for the final side
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PostPosted: Tue Apr 28, 2009 7:52 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Since the beans needs a shoulder to lean on I normally plant a bean plant next to each corn stork. I have tried 3 bean plants per corn, with very little adverse effects other than harvesting the beans becomes a bit more difficult.

Pumpkins and squash form vines. It is a good idea to prune the first vine so that the plant makes more than one vine. Male flowers are formed close to the base of the plant while female flowers are formed on the vines. So by having more than one vine on the stem you will have more fruit. But it should be remembered that since our growing season is short, you should not allow too many fruit per plant. I normally cut the vines when they reach about 6 meters.

Courgette plants are different in that they form a bush. Male flowers are still formed at the base but the female flowers are formed very close to the male floweres and there is no vines. SO no pruning is required.
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foxroxks
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PostPosted: Wed Apr 29, 2009 7:29 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Great . Thanks for the advice its just what i needed Very Happy

Have found a new home for the courgettes. Have a few sugar baby n honey dew on the go & I want to see how they do compared to the greenhouse so might try them out instead.
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Liparis
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PostPosted: Thu Apr 30, 2009 9:12 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Can't find Butternit Squash anywhere. I'm not in the most gardening friendly areas here, strange though being an old market town, selection of seeds is only your basic salads, not even the local Co-op does seeds!!
looks like I will have to try mail order.
Bill.

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