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Plant before 2005, could these seeds be planted?


 
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mojorex
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PostPosted: Tue Apr 14, 2009 7:53 pm    Post subject: Plant before 2005, could these seeds be planted? Reply with quote

Hey, does anyone know how long before seeds die?
I found old seeds the last day and it said on the back plant before 2005 could these seeds be planted?
And how exactly do the seeds die?
And if anyone knows any way of reviving them could they please let me know? Cool

Exclamation Edited by moderator to add descriptive title.
Original title too generic....... (Seeeeeeds!!!)
see rule 11
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James Kilkelly
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PostPosted: Tue Apr 14, 2009 10:28 pm    Post subject: Re: Seeeeeeds!!! Reply with quote

mojorex wrote:
Hey, does anyone know how long before seeds die?
I found old seeds the last day and it said on the back plant before 2005 could these seeds be planted?


Test your seeds now
, an excellent tip by Liparis

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michael brenock
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PostPosted: Tue Apr 14, 2009 11:32 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

re stale seed, some seeds have a very short life such as parsnips and onions, others like cabbage and turnips long 5-8 years and tomatoes up to twelve years, germination is not the only measure in seeds but vigour is important also. germination may be up to 90% but the vigour may be only 30 % and so the crop gets off to a very slow start. Seed needs heat air and moisture to germinate so by storing seed in a sealed screw topped jar in a cool place the seed will last much longer. The seed is a living thing and is constantly using up energy, the slower this rate the longer the seed will last
Michael brenock former and retired horticultural adviser.

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mojorex
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PostPosted: Wed Apr 15, 2009 11:18 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks!
Have you any idea though, how long leek and brussel sprout seedlings last?
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walltoall
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PostPosted: Thu Apr 16, 2009 9:22 am    Post subject: the life of a seed is tied up in nature Reply with quote

Mojorex
Its like asking how long a piece of string is. Read Michael Brenocks answer again. Brussel Sprout is a cabbage and leek is an onion. Your seeds may have been perfectly stored or just thrown there. Why not just plant them. They will either grow or not. On the subject of seed life, I believe that poppy seed can last 50 years in the ground but will only germinate when the ground is 'disturbed' . I found an avocado sprouting in my compost heap when I turned it recently. I've planted it out and it will either grow or not! Peace and goodwill to the kingdom

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medieval knievel
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PostPosted: Thu Apr 16, 2009 10:02 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

the longest i've heard of a seed lasting is 2000 years - magnolia seeds found during an archaeological dig in japan. they sowed them, and a variety of magnolia never seen before grew from at least one seed.
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walltoall
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PostPosted: Thu Apr 16, 2009 10:20 am    Post subject: hi medieval knieval Reply with quote

and before you ask, no I have not found a magnolia seed in my compost this year.
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michael brenock
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PostPosted: Wed May 06, 2009 9:17 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

while seeds have different life spans and a germination test will soon show what the percentage is there is another test that is important for seeds and that is a the vigour test, all viable seeds should germinate almost simoultaneously and not stretched out over a few weeks, those that germinate first or fastest are the more vigorous and will make better and more viable plants that take much longer to germinate. Alitle variation in germination is acceptable but a long drawn out germination indicates old or mixed seed of varying vigour.
michael brenock horticultural advisor (retired)
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Breedeen
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PostPosted: Wed May 13, 2009 6:44 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I never knew that about seeds! Many thanks for the info .
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walltoall
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PostPosted: Wed May 13, 2009 10:18 am    Post subject: Plant before 2005, could these seeds be planted? Reply with quote

Taking wallflowers as my inspiration, over the years I've often let a single plant of whatever I'm growing go to seed and then sowed the seeds the following year. Last year it was flat-leaved parsley; on a section of my gravel path I now have a fine crop of young plants, which are beautiful chopped into meals such as spag.bol. and mixed salads or into homemade egg sandwich spread.

This year the victim is a cabbage plant in my front border which was left over from last year. The flowers are out and next week I'll be wrapping a bit of garden fleece around the plant with an elastic band at the bottom for saving later in the year.

I've never tried to save the seed of a parsnip. Should I?

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michael brenock
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PostPosted: Wed May 13, 2009 7:01 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

yes parsnip seed can be saved and the produce will be fine provided the seed is not from an F1 hybrid when the resultant crop could be varied and very disappointing. Open pollinated(OP) types like Hollow Crown, The Student etc are readily grown from home saved seed. Parsnips are biennials. best of luck.
michael brenock horticultural advisor(retired)
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