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Mushrooms, any clue of what they could be?


 
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daigo75
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PostPosted: Fri Apr 10, 2009 2:07 pm    Post subject: Mushrooms, any clue of what they could be? Reply with quote

Hi all, I found these mushrooms in my garden, and I'd like to find out what they are. About 5-6 cm diameter, color "dirty white", no ring, no spores seen so far (I tried to collect them).
Thank you for the answers Smile



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Garlicbreath
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Location: Wexford

PostPosted: Fri Apr 10, 2009 4:14 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

These look like St George's mushrooms. So called because they usually appear around St George's day on 24th April. They are the first edible variety to appear and aren't very common as far as I know. They usually grow in old pasture that hasn't been disturbed for years. They are absolutely delicious with a strong mushroom odour and flavour. They often grow in rings like you've pictured here. If they are what I think you're very lucky to have them in your garden. I used to walk miles across fields to collect them in the UK and haven't managed to find any in Ireland yet. However, I'd definitely get an expert to check them out before you start cooking!

PS. they can get much bigger than 4-6 cm
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daigo75
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PostPosted: Fri Apr 10, 2009 7:23 pm    Post subject: Thanks Reply with quote

Hi Garlicbreath, thank you for your opinion, they definitely look like St George's mushrooms! Anyway, I agree that I should ask an expert, problem is: where do I find one? Co. Wicklow or Dublin would be ok, if anybody can help I'd be very thankful. Smile
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walltoall
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Location: Thurrock RM15 via Dungarvan and the Banner County

PostPosted: Sat Apr 11, 2009 6:29 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Daigo75
You have been gifted! The photos you show are of the CEP or MOREL fungus (tricholoma gambosum) which is not only edible but excellent to eat. Take one in to the botanic gardens, Glasnevin, Dublin or the botany department of UCD Belfield or Trinity if you are that afraid of these wonderful mushrooms. If you give me a GPS position of your garden, I'll be pleased to call by to identify them and clear them all away. as long as meself and GarlicBreath can check back at regular intervals to keep the area clear for you

All of what GarlicBreath says is true. You have a rare source of free organic food on your property. Ceps often form rings in grassland. The underground fungus grows out from a central point. April to August, ceps (morels) send up their fruiting bodies (the mushrooms which will spread their spores) around the perimeter.

Rings can be of almost any size - from a hand's span to dozens oy yards across and a well established ring can produce several kilos of mushrooms.
The rings are often visible from a distance and lead me the mushrooms. Up close the ceps can be hidden under long grass - you need eyes on the ends of your fingers to find them. The old piseĆ³g about fairy rings was to keep ignorant people away so that people like me could have a four month storehouse of high grade food, before supermarkets.

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Garlicbreath
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PostPosted: Sat Apr 11, 2009 7:37 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I'll second that suggestion walltoall! Wink However, you've got your fungi a bit confused. St George's, cep and morel are three different varieties. All good to eat but they're out at different times of the year. Check out this site for pics of edible fungi. http://www.nifg.org.uk/edible_fungi.htm
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walltoall
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PostPosted: Mon Apr 13, 2009 7:39 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

There you go GarlicBreath, I'm continuously learning and that's what the site is about. Thank you so much for the signpost. I reckon if one can identify the deathcap and destroying angel it's a good start.

I was trying to provide leads that others might follow as I have an arseofthepants way of collecting mushrooms and many of my identity names are Irish and/or colloqual.

St George's mushroom (Calocybe gambosa) was recently moved to its current position being previously Tricholoma gambosum which is the cep family. Morels was a big boo-boo of course as they are a totally different fungus quite rare found in woods and known by my grandad as donkeys dicks.

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James Kilkelly
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PostPosted: Mon Apr 13, 2009 11:16 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

A morel I believe.
Quite a few of these came up in a garden I created a few years back. One season only then never again.
I reckon the spores may have come in on the bark mulch.
I am open to correction on it being a morel.

Walltoall, I know nothing about donkeys. Laughing Laughing



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walltoall
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PostPosted: Tue Apr 14, 2009 4:33 pm    Post subject: There's not mush room in a cep for a morel Reply with quote

Yup! GPI That's a morel all right. I goofed in calling ceps morels in a previous post. As a horticulturalist you'll understand that when they shift latin handkles around they confuse mere mortals like me.
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Garlicbreath
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PostPosted: Thu Apr 16, 2009 11:11 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Dear Daigo75, have you tried them yet?

A positive outcome of this thread is that I may have found a source of St George's mushrooms near here. They haven't yet put in an appearance so I'm waiting impatiently, salivating every time I think about them Razz
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walltoall
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PostPosted: Fri Apr 17, 2009 6:56 am    Post subject: The not mush room in a toad stool Reply with quote

Hey GarlicBreath! Wexford's a big county. I don't suppose you have GPS co-ords for your find so I might help to identify them for you, slobber slobber
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daigo75
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PostPosted: Fri Apr 17, 2009 7:32 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hi all,
I ate them two days ago, and they were great! I'm still alive, so I can confirm they are the right ones. Smile
They taste very nice, with a hint of forest and hazelnut. They are fleshy, with a nice texture. Smile
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