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Horse Manure


 
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Sive
Rank attained: Chlorophyll for blood


Joined: 18 Apr 2008
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Location: Co.Wexford

PostPosted: Tue Mar 31, 2009 6:02 pm    Post subject: Horse Manure Reply with quote

Help! My neighbour is very generously dumping a load of brilliant horse manure into my garden and so far I'm not getting any smell off it at all.....does this mean it is safe to use? (he thinks it's about 9 months old) I've never used horse manure before, so any advice as to where I can use it......in the vegetable beds? Do I dig it into flower beds or put it on as a mulch?
We are a perfect match....he's delighted to be getting rid of it, and I'm delighted to be getting it!
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Liparis
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PostPosted: Tue Mar 31, 2009 7:45 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Yes, go ahead and use it, great stuff horse muck. Use it as a mulch on your flower/shrub beds and dig it into your veg plot. It's always better to dig in manure in autumn or early winter, but what the heck, it's already lain for a while. Don't manure the patch your growing your root crops in though, they really don't like freshly manured ground, whether it's spring or winter manured. You can give them a piece of ground next year that you manure now and grow a different crop in.
Bill.

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Sive
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PostPosted: Tue Mar 31, 2009 9:33 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks Bill....by root crops I presume you also mean potatoes?
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Moggi
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PostPosted: Tue Mar 31, 2009 10:09 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hi dont know about the spuds but definitely carrots and parsnips as I think they "fork" in freshly manured soil.
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Sive
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PostPosted: Wed Apr 01, 2009 7:56 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks moggi.......does anyone know whether manure is a bad idea for potatoes, as the husband is about to plant his potatoes this week ??
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James Kilkelly
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PostPosted: Wed Apr 01, 2009 9:08 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Into the base of the trench, you should add some fertiliser to aid the growth of your new potato plants, as they are very hungry feeders. You can add a light shake of artificial potato fertiliser (7:6:17) or some shovels of well-rotted compost/farmyard manure. To prevent burning of the new plants and an increased chance of potato scab, both these additions should be covered with an inch or two of soil before the seed potatoes go in.

From here.... Grow your own potatoes.

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Michael196
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PostPosted: Wed Apr 01, 2009 9:13 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

hi Sive

just referencing the Dr Hessayon Vegtable and herb expert books here,

Roots: potatoes beetroot, carrot, artichoke, chicory, parsnip, salsify, ...

it says do not manure, but I reckon thats fresh manure, . it says manure in in winter or autumn and allow to compost down

so I guess if your stuff does not smell , is 9 months old, and the texture is closer to compost, rather than fresh manure, then you could proceed . use the most decomposed parts closeset to where you are going to sow.

i used fresher bagged manure last year and grew parsnips etc in it, absolute disaster !!!

if you think it is crumbly enough and decomposed enough then use away, if parts are still fresh and not decomposed , then set these aside ( into a composter )

hope this helps
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Sive
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PostPosted: Wed Apr 01, 2009 10:21 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks everyone, I'm beginning to grasp the principles involved and as we don't grow parsnips or carrots (yet!) I won't have to worry about that. Covering the manure with soil sounds logical, so we'll do that.
Youngest son and friend (both 25 ) are giving us a couple days' labour, which is as exciting as the heap of dung in the garden !...my job will be to feed the troops I think, and admire the results, and sleep well tonight with no aching muscles!
Perfect bliss!
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Liparis
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PostPosted: Wed Apr 01, 2009 10:52 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Yep, GPI's right, the potatoes won't mind the manure as long as there's an inch or two of soil on top as it really does cause potato scab. Potato scabbed spuds are OK to eat, the scab peels off no problem, but it will affect their keeping and storing qualities. Eat the scabbed potatoes and store the clean ones.
Bill.

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