Irish Gardeners Forum Home
 FAQFAQ   MemberlistMemberlist   UsergroupsUsergroups   RegisterRegister 
 ProfileProfile   Log in to check your private messagesLog in to check your private messages   Log inLog in 
Custom Search
   
Weather Report /
Moon Phase for Ireland

Post new topic   Reply to topic    Irish Gardeners Forum Home -> Garden planning, prep and landscape design in Ireland

My "new" established garden full of rocks just und


 
Most Recent Posts 2016 Vegetable quizz.
Last post: Greengage
funny
Last post: tagwex
Skimmia seed wanted
Last post: Brendankearns
At last! A garden joke. (except maybe it's not a joke!)
Last post: Ado 2
 
Visit TheGardenShop.ie
Author Message
Sunflower
Rank attained: Hawthorn Tree
Rank attained: Hawthorn Tree


Joined: 10 Mar 2009
Posts: 65
Location: Galway City

PostPosted: Sat Mar 21, 2009 12:18 am    Post subject: My "new" established garden full of rocks just und Reply with quote

Hello,

My first post! So, we are lucky to have a large enough garden in Galway city, it measures about 45ft width and 25ft length. The house is about 20yrs old and so we have some great established plants, mostly trees. The problem, most of the garden is north facing, though I must stress the end (45ft) gets sun in the morning and evening, from about 3pm or so. There is an Alder (I think - has catkins now and lots of bumblebees) at one corner and a two more trees I haven't identified yet at the other end. We also have horrible old Gorse tree that is mostly woody now, which I'd like to take out but would be open to saving. Inbetween there are, among others, a few very old blackberry bushes which I like, but they are so old should I forget them??
I don't want to be a question-quigley here at all; in fact my main problem is that when I start to dig around these long established plants all I get is rocks. Just a few inches under the surface everywhere - rocks!! The legacy of builders in the 80's who just loaded soil on the rubble left behind.
So my question - should I pull as many rocks as I can out (some are massive!!) and add new compost or will that disrupt the established plants. I don't care for the gorse and would get over the brambles but I dont want to damage the trees - the birds love them (as do I) and they really frame the garden. I'm afraid of disturbing the soil and regretting it later.
Money is an issue (when is it not), but we're a young couple who are dying to get stuck in - just don't want to make a hames of it.

Please, apologies for the long post, it's my first, and if anybody feels a picture would help I'll try to upload it - no promises though in that respect.

Sunflower

PS; One plant we inherited is a massive fushia, it's so big by now (over 10ft), can I prune it hard or should I leave it - would rather keep it massive than to lose it (yes, I am question -quigley...sorry)
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Sive
Rank attained: Chlorophyll for blood


Joined: 18 Apr 2008
Posts: 1731
Location: Co.Wexford

PostPosted: Sat Mar 21, 2009 5:04 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I'm no expert here, but I would imagine that if you can, you could slowly take out whatever smaller rocks you find, one at a time.....I can't imagine this would harm existing plants....quite the opposite I would have thought.
What does anyone else think?
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Liparis
Rank attained: Orchard owner


Joined: 23 Sep 2007
Posts: 651
Location: Co. Meath

PostPosted: Sat Mar 21, 2009 6:21 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Shouldn't be a problem as long as you ensure you fill those wholes full with soil/compost and don't leave too large an air gap round the roots. The alternative is, if it aint broke, why fix it? Although all those stones do provide places for pernicious weeds to root making it very difficult to get them out with trowel etc.
Bill.

_________________
Earth is the insane asylum of the Universe.

http://www.species-specific.com/orchid-forum/
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
medieval knievel
Rank attained: Chlorophyll for blood


Joined: 03 Sep 2007
Posts: 1008

PostPosted: Sat Mar 21, 2009 8:12 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

i'd imagine that the time that is best to lift the stones is rapidly coming to an end - probably best to leave any root disturbance till the winter (which admittedly is when the soil is hardest to work, and the days are cold and short, so i'm talking from the plant's viewpoint here).
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Sunflower
Rank attained: Hawthorn Tree
Rank attained: Hawthorn Tree


Joined: 10 Mar 2009
Posts: 65
Location: Galway City

PostPosted: Mon Mar 23, 2009 6:08 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks for the tips, I was thinking time is not on my side either but just spent the afternoon pulling some. Some are so large though that I think boulders would be a better word for them. Think 2ft x 2ft firmly lodged just under the surface they weigh a tonne!! but we're going to use them for something else at some stage.

Thanks again for your help Very Happy
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Display posts from previous:   
Post new topic   Reply to topic    Irish Gardeners Forum Home -> Garden planning, prep and landscape design in Ireland All times are GMT
Page 1 of 1

 

Jump to:  
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum
You can attach files in this forum
You can download files in this forum


Powered by phpBB © 2001, 2005 phpBB Group

Privacy Policy | Copyright © 2006 - 2016 IrishGardeners.com (part of GardenPlansIreland.com)