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Blank Slate in the Midlands


 
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tailspin
Rank attained: Hazel Tree
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Joined: 01 Sep 2008
Posts: 18

PostPosted: Tue Mar 17, 2009 10:33 pm    Post subject: Blank Slate in the Midlands Reply with quote

Hi All

I've been keeping an eye on this site for a while and thought it was about time I introduced myself. I'm Steve and I'm a novice gardener. I'm in the process of moving from Dublin to the Midlands and in the process from a very small town garden to 3/4 of an acre*.

The garden is in a very windy hilltop location. There are neighbours on one side and unspoilt country views on all the others. The site was originally very wet, with a lot of surface water, but we have got professional assistance and got a proper drainage system put in. This was completed last week and already has made a very noticeable difference. We are waiting for the site to dry out before getting some topsoil delivered. Once that arrives we'll have a completely blank slate!

I attach a few photos for your perusal...


Regards,

Tailspin

*note: I'm do live in a house - not a garden.



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Wet Wet Wet .. before the drainage.
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Welcome in ...
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Kitchen View
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The back side
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The far side
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Sive
Rank attained: Chlorophyll for blood


Joined: 18 Apr 2008
Posts: 1731
Location: Co.Wexford

PostPosted: Wed Mar 18, 2009 8:05 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Good luck from another hilltop windy location here! A couple of your boundaries look clean enough for planting.....it would be the perfect chance to plant bare-root native hedging straight away.......you'll need the shelter!
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walltoall
Rank attained: Orchard owner


Joined: 25 Aug 2008
Posts: 705
Location: Thurrock RM15 via Dungarvan and the Banner County

PostPosted: Wed Mar 18, 2009 10:32 am    Post subject: Now that's a proper windswept Reply with quote

Tailspin,
Firstly, welcome out into the sunlight. There's no knowing how many lurkers are still hiding their lights under bushes. That's a grand opportunity you have there. Do I see the Slieve Blooms in the distance?

Being as how you need to protect yourself as SIVE says try this link to start

http://www.anu.ie/seaside/

They do mail order and have a way to go before they are web-smart, but that's their business. I used them about 15 years ago when I had a place near Ballyvaughan 200 feet above Muckinish castle, which I wanted to make a garden of.

"Seaside Nurseries" specialise in bullet-proof trees, shrubs and plants. I still have their catalogue which scores their offerings on a scale of 1 to 10. Anything above about 7 works in most windy locations. I'd be pleased to give you info from the catalogue if you want it.

The most brilliant thing they had was a netting which could take storm force winds and break them up on the lea side. I've no idea what the netting is called but it breaks up the wind like a dry stone wall does. They imported it and I have never seen it anywhere else. When I wanted to get some shrubs going at Muckinish they told me to use the netting to start and they were right.

Warning: it's a hell of a drive. But it's magic country out beyond Clifden. Now I'm making myself homesick.
'Bye.

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verge
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Joined: 04 Jun 2006
Posts: 598
Location: Ireland

PostPosted: Wed Mar 18, 2009 12:24 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Before you sow a lawn make sure you lawn drainage is tip-top as there is quite a bit of reed showing up on "the far side". Put garden drainage or lawn drainage into the search box at the top to learn more about this or else you can trawl back through the lawn section.
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tailspin
Rank attained: Hazel Tree
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PostPosted: Wed Mar 18, 2009 12:43 pm    Post subject: Thanks Reply with quote

Hi Guys

Thanks for the replies. Was thinking about putting in some bare root hedging alright, Sive. Also was thinking of planting some silver birch to the SE of the site (between us and the neighbours), to create more shelter.

Not sure if we will be ready in time tho - there is still topsoil to go on and the season is running out. Plan was for Beech (green/copper mix) and possibly holly along the front and beech/hawthorn/other native hedging along the other sides. There is an existing hedge on one side but that needs thickening up.

walltoall - not sure if I'll be in Cliften, but will give them a ring when we have figured out exactly what we want. Will mainly be bare root.

verge - have already got some drainage put in but this was only completed during the week, the garden is already much drier. 'The far side' was waterlogged until a few days ago. We'll be getting some topsoil put and hopefully the reeds won't reappear. There were reeds covering most of the site but when drainage was put in they were dug up.

I have a few questions about planting trees/hedges and shall post them in the apropriate forums.

Regards,

Tailspin.
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walltoall
Rank attained: Orchard owner


Joined: 25 Aug 2008
Posts: 705
Location: Thurrock RM15 via Dungarvan and the Banner County

PostPosted: Wed Mar 18, 2009 1:07 pm    Post subject: planting them trees Reply with quote

Tailspin
You can only plant bare-root when saplings are asleep for the Winter, which they are not now. Nurseries often sell saplings growing in pots at this time of year. Providing you don't disturb the roots too much they will grow perfectly well in the ground especially if you make a biggish hole and use a bit of compost. Also check with Agriculture Dept. and the Forest Commission for possibly free trees.
WallToAll

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tailspin
Rank attained: Hazel Tree
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PostPosted: Wed Mar 18, 2009 1:35 pm    Post subject: free trees? Reply with quote

Hi Walltoall

Yes - it looks like we'll miss out for this year. Given the size of the site I'm not sure if it is economical to plant container plants. We would need enough plants for at least 50m of hedge and about 20 trees.

We were thinking of mixing some holly into the Beech hedge and I was told that Holly is normally supplied in a container, so we could plant some in advance of the rest.

Free trees sound good - any more details?

Thanks,

Tailspin.
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Sive
Rank attained: Chlorophyll for blood


Joined: 18 Apr 2008
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Location: Co.Wexford

PostPosted: Wed Mar 18, 2009 3:23 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

We planted 100 metres of mixed native hedging on March 26th last year....all bar about 8 plants have survived their first year. They were all bare-rooted when planted...and young.....about 2 to 3 feet tall.
We kept them weed-free and added one mulch in that year......and the atrocious summer kept them well watered !
So maybe not too late........
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tailspin
Rank attained: Hazel Tree
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PostPosted: Wed Mar 18, 2009 7:57 pm    Post subject: fingers crossed Reply with quote

WIth a bit of luck we might get a start made ...
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walltoall
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Location: Thurrock RM15 via Dungarvan and the Banner County

PostPosted: Wed Mar 18, 2009 10:05 pm    Post subject: The voice of experience must be heard. Reply with quote

I will not go against experience. SIVE is an old hand. If she says it works up to end of March, go for it. I just thought you'd find it hard to locate bareroot plants or they would be budding already.

That little chunk of East? back boundary which is a continuation of your neighbours fence looks a prime target for a few birch. The hedge between you and them looks pretty ok in the front and well minded.

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James Kilkelly
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Joined: 30 May 2006
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Location: West of Ireland

PostPosted: Thu Mar 19, 2009 12:14 am    Post subject: Re: Thanks Reply with quote

tailspin wrote:

Plan was for Beech (green/copper mix)
.


tailspin do you mean like green,copper, green,copper?
Personally not a mix I would be in favour of. A bit too dotty for my liking.
I reckon they look much better as complete blocks, or else go for a total mixed wild hedgerow and throw fuchsia, hawthorn, hazel, snowberry etc into the mix.

By the way love your avatar, leave a share of the cows for me Laughing

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Michael196
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PostPosted: Fri Mar 20, 2009 12:20 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hi GPI

I have a green / copper beech mix in random amounts 2 or three of each cpper and green against a second row of equally mixed, with mided in rosa rugoaas and berberis towards the front.

Copper / green mixed can look very attractive indeed,
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James Kilkelly
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PostPosted: Fri Mar 20, 2009 12:33 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I know it's just personally a look I never favoured.
Nothing at all wrong with it, just not for me visually.
You could compare it to tastes in fashion or food, for example I love mashed potatoes with chopped cabbage as a side. The missus on the other hand loves the mash but cannot abide the cabbage.
Never understood it myself, and I'm sure you cannot understand how I do not favour the look of copper/green beech Very Happy .
It's views like this that keep things interesting.

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Moffo
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PostPosted: Mon Mar 23, 2009 12:58 pm    Post subject: Re: The voice of experience must be heard. Reply with quote

[quote="walltoall"]I will not go against experience. SIVE is an old hand. If she says it works up to end of March, go for it. I just thought you'd find it hard to locate bareroot plants or they would be budding already.

quote]

Just finished planting 125 Bare Root Beech hedging this weekend, picked them up from Coillte Nurseries. Was advised by Coillte that they have them in cold storage up until May, good to plant up til then !!
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tailspin
Rank attained: Hazel Tree
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PostPosted: Wed Mar 31, 2010 10:11 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hi Guys

Just thought I'd let you know how I got on. I didn't get to plant anything last year because the garden wasn't dry enough. It wasn't until last weekend that I could finally get started.

I went for a mix of about 80% Green Beech and 20% holly, so I can't wait to see how that turns out. I planted them across the front and half way up the side. I'm debating now whether to prune them this year or wait until next year.

The plants were sourced from a local nursery - just 5 minutes down the road and the quality seems excellent.

Apologies for the lack of photos - I seem to have misplaced my camera ..
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