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To spray or not to spray


 
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caoimhin
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PostPosted: Sun Mar 15, 2009 9:49 pm    Post subject: To spray or not to spray Reply with quote

I know for some people spraying with weed killer is a complete NO NO, its just that my plot is covered in weeds since last year and while I would prefer not to use round up or other weed killers, I would like to be ready to plant asap. Any suggestions? Thanks
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Liparis
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PostPosted: Sun Mar 15, 2009 10:51 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Roundup, but you need the temperature and growth starting. Don't be afraid to use weedkillers, sensibly, there is far too much hype about not using them, sometimes there's no option. I for one wouldn't have gotten on top of my very serious bindweed problem without it. We have enough work to do without fighting a losing battle against some weeds and pretending there is no place in the garden for weedkiller.
Bill.

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foxroxks
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PostPosted: Sun Mar 15, 2009 10:54 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I'm still figuring this out myself but what I have found is that using roundup etc is is a slow process . I dont know how big a space ur working with but last year I just put some backache in & dug out each of the weeds & believe me there was nothing but weeds but it seems to have worked, I didnt have near a much work this year Very Happy
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James Kilkelly
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PostPosted: Mon Mar 16, 2009 2:16 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

A lot depends on the types of weed present and the size of area concerned caoimhin.
I would have no problem digging over a 2mtr x 2mtr to clear it of perennial weeds, but make that 10mtr x 10mtr that you need to plant asap, then I would consider the herbicide option.
Funnily enough I actually put together a post on the subject today on my new allotment blog...... Weeds, a pre-emptive strike (on Allotments.ie)

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Liparis
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PostPosted: Mon Mar 16, 2009 10:12 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I'm doing 20 metres by 30 metres, full of bindweed, bishops weed as well as your usual dandilion etc. Trust me, you won't do it with back-ache. My first year it was sprayed with round up. 3 weeks later when top growth began to die I sprayed with Gromoxone (It's off the market now) and had the top growth dead within 48 hrs then digging began. I have some photographs somewhere, but I just can't find them at the moment, but 4" down in that soil it was litterally a net of bindweed roots, a finer net that you would get in a ladies stockings! Out came every last piece I found, dead and alive. I took them away by the barrow load. This spring, I still have bindweed but it's managable, as I'm preparing the garden I'm removing lengths of root up to three feet long. The trouble is, that as you cultivate garden with bindweed, or if you are really unlucky enough, horsetail, then you end up propogataing it. Dandilions etc are a dawdle, if that's all you have and your dealing with a small area, you can easily get rid of them as you dig.
I have another plot which if no one takes on I will spray with round up in about 1 months time, it's adjoining mine and full of bindweed which very quickly creeps into my my veg plot, by the end of the season it has gone about 2' into my veg, each year I clear it out about 5' back from the edge of mine. It will get between two and three treatments (I'm not cultivating it until next spring) through the course of the year and will be a dawdle to do in the autumn.
As I grow veg each year, I spot-treat the bindweed that apears. If you leave a bit in the ground when pulling them, you get two plants, believe me, these plants have rocket-fueled roots.
Bill.

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medieval knievel
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PostPosted: Mon Mar 16, 2009 8:10 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

i've managed to avoid weedkiller so far, and the intention is to stay that way if i can.

i do know someone who had to deal with a back garden choked with japanese knotweed when she bought a house a few weeks ago, though. never found out how she fared.

but i heard one way of dealing with weeds was to leave the immersion on for a few hours, and then hose the offending area down with hot water.
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Liparis
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PostPosted: Mon Mar 16, 2009 10:09 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

medieval knievel wrote:

i do know someone who had to deal with a back garden choked with japanese knotweed when she bought a house a few weeks ago, though. never found out how she fared.


She won't be faring well, I don't think they have found a weedkiller yet that works and those blasted things are not easily dug up, top that with poisoning the soil and you have one mighty headache.
Bill.

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caoimhin
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PostPosted: Tue Mar 17, 2009 12:44 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks for the advice. My plot is approx 15m x 15m and digging out last year took a while so I'll go with the round up. How long after can I plant?
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Liparis
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PostPosted: Tue Mar 17, 2009 1:31 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Depending on the temps, it could take 3 weeks for things to die, it's got to get through the plants system, hence the plants/weeds need to have started growing. Usually once the foliage is well on the turn you can start. Don't forget though, keep that hoe working daily afterwards as there will be lots of weeds from seed to follow.
An old saying is "One years seeds is seven years weeds." Referring to how long, on average, weed seeds are viable after being cast into the soil. It varies a lot though, research has found that Docken seeds can be viable up to 75 years later.
Bill.

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