Irish Gardeners Forum Home
 FAQFAQ   MemberlistMemberlist   UsergroupsUsergroups   RegisterRegister 
 ProfileProfile   Log in to check your private messagesLog in to check your private messages   Log inLog in 
Custom Search
   
Weather Report /
Moon Phase for Ireland

Post new topic   Reply to topic    Irish Gardeners Forum Home -> Vegetable growing, fruit and allotments in Ireland

soil, heavy bog like, any good for growing vegetables?


 
Most Recent Posts funny
Last post: tagwex
Skimmia seed wanted
Last post: Brendankearns
At last! A garden joke. (except maybe it's not a joke!)
Last post: Ado 2
2016 Vegetable quizz.
Last post: Greengage
 
Visit TheGardenShop.ie
Author Message
optimistic gardener
Rank attained: Hazel Tree
Rank attained: Hazel Tree


Joined: 08 Mar 2009
Posts: 3
Location: Donegal

PostPosted: Mon Mar 09, 2009 9:28 am    Post subject: soil, heavy bog like, any good for growing vegetables? Reply with quote

I have some very heavy bog like soil, is this any good for growing vegetables in ?

Exclamation Edited by moderator to add descriptive title............... see rule 11 http://www.gardenplansireland.com/forum/about27.html
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Liparis
Rank attained: Orchard owner


Joined: 23 Sep 2007
Posts: 651
Location: Co. Meath

PostPosted: Mon Mar 09, 2009 1:09 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

It will be if you can drain it and get it opened up with sand etc. Perhaps some simple draining.
Divide it into plots and use french drains or similar as the divisions.
Dig the plots using plenty farmyard manure, if it's got clay type material in then open that up with sand. If it just needs draining - no clay - then farmyard manure will get it going just fine. Havng been bog, it won't have very much nutrition, if any, in it.
Bill.

_________________
Earth is the insane asylum of the Universe.

http://www.species-specific.com/orchid-forum/
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
optimistic gardener
Rank attained: Hazel Tree
Rank attained: Hazel Tree


Joined: 08 Mar 2009
Posts: 3
Location: Donegal

PostPosted: Mon Mar 09, 2009 1:49 pm    Post subject: soil Reply with quote

many thanks Bill very helpfull. I was thinking about trying it out in two raised beds mixed with some manure, should I mix in some sand aswell ?
Seamus
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Liparis
Rank attained: Orchard owner


Joined: 23 Sep 2007
Posts: 651
Location: Co. Meath

PostPosted: Mon Mar 09, 2009 2:18 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I wouldn't worry if it's nt clay, the farmyard manure (lots of) will open it up. It will soon drain if your raising the plots.
Bill.

_________________
Earth is the insane asylum of the Universe.

http://www.species-specific.com/orchid-forum/
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
verge
Rank: Chief Moderator


Joined: 04 Jun 2006
Posts: 598
Location: Ireland

PostPosted: Mon Mar 09, 2009 2:31 pm    Post subject: Re: soil Reply with quote

wrote:
I was thinking about trying it out in two raised beds mixed with some manure, should I mix in some sand aswell ?
Seamus


A bit more from here optimistic gardener Planning a Vegetable Garden? How to Make a Vegetable Garden.

You may not initially have a good soil type, one that is made up of 50% soil, 25% water and 25% air space, but it is possible to get close to it through carefully adding certain materials to your existing soil. In the case of heavy clay soils, you can greatly improve the movement of water, air and nutrients within them by digging in a 3 to 4 inch layer of gritty sand as deep as you can. The addition of chunky well-rotted compost/farmyard manure will open clay soil up further and help prevent that dreadful cracked earth effect that clays display during dry periods.

When amending sandy soils, your goal is to increase the soil's ability to hold water and nutrients. For this you can once again add a 3 to 4 inch layer of well-rotted compost/farmyard manure by spading or forking it in as deep as you can.
Few soils will not benefit from the addition of well-rotted compost/farmyard manure, ask around and you will find that most seasoned vegetable gardeners will dig some into their veg beds each autumn. This is carried out for all the reasons mentioned above, as well as to replace the great quantities of nutrients used up by hungry feeding vegetables.

_________________
How to post pics on the forum.

Benefited from us? Then link to us or tell others.

http://www.allotments.ie/ Ireland's allotments.
On Twitter... http://twitter.com/Allotments
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Liparis
Rank attained: Orchard owner


Joined: 23 Sep 2007
Posts: 651
Location: Co. Meath

PostPosted: Mon Mar 09, 2009 9:23 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I always top dress/mulch with farmyard manure through the growing season as well. It conserves water, reduces greatly the need to water in dry weather, if you put it on early enough, and you'd be surprised how it has worked into the soil, improving it, during the growing season. Helped of course by our friendly worms.
Bill.

_________________
Earth is the insane asylum of the Universe.

http://www.species-specific.com/orchid-forum/
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
Display posts from previous:   
Post new topic   Reply to topic    Irish Gardeners Forum Home -> Vegetable growing, fruit and allotments in Ireland All times are GMT
Page 1 of 1

 

Jump to:  
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum
You can attach files in this forum
You can download files in this forum


Powered by phpBB © 2001, 2005 phpBB Group

Privacy Policy | Copyright © 2006 - 2016 IrishGardeners.com (part of GardenPlansIreland.com)