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Bamboo..how to grow successfully?


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loopy
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PostPosted: Tue Mar 03, 2009 7:33 pm    Post subject: Bamboo..how to grow successfully? Reply with quote

Hope I'm in the right forum!

My query is bamboo..I have tried to grow this successfully a few times now..I'm still not sure if they like pots or not. I've one in the ground and 2 in very large pots on the decking. I know they only have one growing season but outside that, I tend to get leaves that look like they have died..a lot of the plant looks the same all year. Is there any way to keep them greenish all year? Do they need feeding? Has anyone grown successfully in pots? Any tips much appreciated!
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Liparis
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PostPosted: Tue Mar 03, 2009 9:19 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Some, dwarf types do well in pots. Larger ones are probaly better in the ground. They need free root run, many are invasive so choose your species wisely.
Dying leaves may be natural, many bamboos loose the lower leaves as they grow. If the leaves on the growing points remain healthy and the point is growing, then I wouldn't overly worry.
Bill.

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walltoall
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PostPosted: Tue Mar 03, 2009 10:33 pm    Post subject: growing bamboo Reply with quote

I grow mine between two shed walls that happen to be about four feet apart and the bamboo are well shaded. They need to be in the ground so their roots get free run as Liparis says but also so they get loads of moisture. I took away a water chute from the shed so what rain we get could pour straight onto the ground and they seem to thrive. Its about the only bit of attention they get. Their invasiveness is kinda like raspberries. They just put up shoots everywhere. I have now got to the harvesting stage with mine which went in to that place in 2003. Each year now I cut between twelve to twenty canes. There is always a thick carpet of fallen leaves under them. They seem to discard lower leaves at an early or any opportunity but there are always green leaves at the top. Should I get a giant panda?
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Bobwilliams
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PostPosted: Tue Mar 03, 2009 11:49 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

From my experiance the only good reason to plant bamboo in pots is to control its spread. The down points of the pots are many, chiefly the watering as the bamboo has so many leaves being dried out by the wind but only a little root compartment to supply water.
loopy i believe thats why you tend to get leaves that look like they have died. you could possibly divide them now, replant one setion in the tub complete with compost laced with water retention crystals.
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loopy
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PostPosted: Wed Mar 04, 2009 7:04 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Great idea on the dividing of them...hadnt thought of that..I assume its just break apart and re-plant? I think the one in the pot is probably outgrown it and I'll try planting and see if it improves. I always water them very well..god knows they got enough water last summer Laughing Laughing
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Ciotog
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PostPosted: Thu Apr 09, 2009 8:52 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Fascinating! I'll have to try bamboo.
But how do I start? Can I buy roots or do I have to start from seed?
And what about the edible shoots? Are they a different variety from the canes?
Any information greatly appreciated.
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walltoall
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PostPosted: Thu Apr 09, 2009 12:55 pm    Post subject: shooting a chewy bamboo Reply with quote

Dia dhuit Ciotóg. Hundreds of bamboo varieties provide edible shoots. It takes about four years though from first planting to first nibbling. Bamboo seeds is not the way to go. Use rhisome buds. No idea where to send you in Clare to get such an item as I've been out of the banner over ten years. "Rhisome" means the plant grows like scutch grass roots; any little bit of root can be buried and will produce a plant.
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Ciotog
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PostPosted: Thu Apr 09, 2009 4:57 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks Walltoall. Keanes Garden Centre in Kilcolgan don't have any but I'll try further afield. It seems you grow them like asparagus and harvest the shoots in the spring. I'll surprise them yet at the Ballyvaughan Farmers Market.
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stevemc
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PostPosted: Thu Apr 09, 2009 5:50 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I didnt think you could plant anything in Ballyvaughan it cant have any more than 2" of topsoil ontop of that big lump of rock Smile Wifes Mum and Dad were from Carrigaholt and its starting to be a bit of a annual pilgrimage to the cousins Pub down there
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davidnugent
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PostPosted: Thu Apr 09, 2009 8:24 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

B&Q & Homebase have a very good selection of bamboo,I have pseudosasa japonica,loves full sun and fully hardy,but doesent like prolonged periods of frost,preforms best in rich well-drained soil,do not allow the plant to become too dry,if the edges of the leaves curl inwards,take this as a sign that the bamboo needs a generous watering.
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walltoall
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PostPosted: Fri Apr 10, 2009 9:18 am    Post subject: shooting a chewy bamboo Reply with quote

That's very nice David but can you eat the shoots of pseudosasa japonica? That is what this particular drift of the bamboo thread is about good buddy.
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davidnugent
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PostPosted: Fri Apr 10, 2009 12:42 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

walltoall,I think you should read the first part of the trend again,good buddy.and for your question is yes,edible parts are seed & stem. Very Happy
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johnoconnell
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PostPosted: Sun Apr 19, 2009 7:05 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I've got the same issue - I bought three bamboos from home base - admittedly they were discounted and weren't quite as healthy as they should have been. I have a 160cm wide x 40 / 50cm deep x maybe 70 / 80 cm high box for the bamboo to grow in - it's broken brick down the bottom, looser bits and soil on that and the rest is potting compost - I read that they liked a soil that drained well, hence the make up of it. The leaves started to go very dry and creamy coloured recently so I went back to the gardener in home base for her advise on how to get them back growing again and she mentioned the wind factor - the bed is attached to a shed with a wall running along it so hopefully no major wind. I've put in a general plant food into the soil but has anyone any idea what might be causing the lack of growth? If the soil is retaining too much water what visible effect would it have on the plant so I can diagnose the issue?

Cheers!

John
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Liparis
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PostPosted: Sun Apr 19, 2009 7:17 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Too much water shows similar characteristics as too little. But with all that rubble in the box, it's possibly too little. You may need to add a bit more humus for moisture retension.
Bill.

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Ciotog
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PostPosted: Sun Apr 19, 2009 7:34 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks to all contributors for such a fund of information. I hope to get my first bamboo this week and am really looking forward to it.
I'll report on progress later.
Regards
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