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Identify the unknown Tree?


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Sun Starved Zimbo
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PostPosted: Sun Mar 01, 2009 5:29 pm    Post subject: Identify the unknown Tree? Reply with quote

Afternoon Everyone

second attempt at posting on this great site, last post vanished into cyber space so if two similar posts appear I stand guilty as charged.
Hoping this great site will help me in filling in the blanks regards gardening this side of the planet.
Previous owner planted this tree in the front garden, it has virtually doubled in size in the last 18 months and now I am concerned it will become a problem.
Can anyone identify it and give me a "heads up" as to how big they grow and what root damage can they cause?
Leaf formation fern like and it bears small yellow flower not unlike the Acacia trees back in sunny Africa.

Thanks

Sun Starved Zimbo



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Liparis
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PostPosted: Sun Mar 01, 2009 5:58 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Could it be Robinia pseudoacacia ? Can you give us a closer view of the foliage?
If it is, they are large majestic trees and worthy a place in most large gardens.
Bill.

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Sun Starved Zimbo
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PostPosted: Mon Mar 02, 2009 6:18 pm    Post subject: foilage close up Reply with quote

Thanks for getting back to me so quick, this is a close up of a foliage tip I removed for identification purposes.
If this is indeed what you think it is then I think I have a major problem, as the previous owner has planted the tree very close to the boundery wall, and as a Semi D large garden we are not!
If i was to keep it trimmed and in reasonable size will the roots do damage to walls or paving?

Thanks



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Liparis
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PostPosted: Mon Mar 02, 2009 11:52 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Looks like an Acacia, definately not Robinia.
Large shrubby trees to around 30'
Anyone else want to have a try? I think the only oter genus that would come close are the Mimosa trees but I don't know of a yellow one, they are usually white to pink flowered, as are the herb Mimosa.
Bill.

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Sun Starved Zimbo
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PostPosted: Tue Mar 03, 2009 7:23 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks Bill
Appreciate your help, kind of strange I travel hundreds of km's out of Africa trading White ants (Termites) and droughts for drainage problems and Slugs to end up with an Acacia lookalike in the front yard, they do say you can never really leave Africa............
is this a sign?

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walltoall
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PostPosted: Tue Mar 03, 2009 11:36 am    Post subject: Laburnum no Black Locust no Acacia probably Reply with quote

Zimbo,
I think Liparis got target with second shot. Acacia should have thorns and wicked ones at that. But you would know Acacia as it is common in South Africa?The flowers in your second picture look really like Acacia flowers and the leaf structure is generally right. There's over 1300 types of Acacia in the world mostly in Australia and some of them grow excellently well in the British Isles.

If yours has thorns, you may have Acacia farnesiana which definitely shares the leaf structure of your picture. I'm fascinated (presuming the photos are very recent) that it may be fully leafed in February. Did leaves over-winter? That would make it easier to eventually exactly what it is.

I see ash saplings in the background? Your main worry is whether the roots of your tree will do damage. Ash is much more dangerous to underground pipes, foundations. Acacia roots in general tend to be fibrous with lots near the surface and with a tap root going straight down. That means they don't tend to do underground damage.

It certainly looks a very nice tree. Shall we try to save it first and condemn it only if it is guilty? Can you do a close up of the bark? Acacia bark is easy to identify!

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Sun Starved Zimbo
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PostPosted: Wed Mar 04, 2009 7:19 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hi Walltoal
Thanks for the input, images are from the weekend and Monday evening. Leaves have remained on the tree right through all seasons, with very little loss even in winter.
Bark is quite smooth and red / brown in colour but then that may be due to the age of the tree, will get another close up of that this weekend as away on business at present.

I have no desire to harm the poor tree just want to know i am not going to be responsible for wrecking the estate services with invading roots, would have been much happier if the previous owner had planted this in the back where it could take pride and place, but such is life....

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walltoall
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PostPosted: Wed Mar 04, 2009 7:40 am    Post subject: identifying that nice tree Reply with quote

Zimbo,
Focus ,man, focus. Has the tree got thorns?

It is a lovely looking tree and my instinct is it would not do underground damage. But I can't say that in public.It looks 'young' maybe this side of ten years old? What height is at the mo. 12 feet? More? Less? The fact that it stays 'furnished' across an Irish Winter makes it a desirable addition to one's arboral inventory. I can only take so much coniferous evergreens before I puke.

Focus ,man, focus. Has the tree got thorns?

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Liparis
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PostPosted: Wed Mar 04, 2009 12:54 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

A lot of theAcacias are evergreen, some are wintergreen, bark colour varies from grey, through green to red/browns. Some species may only have thorns on the upper growths and young growth, but many will retain them on growth several years old. If it's an Acacia, I don't think it will do too much damage, if any.
Bill.

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PostPosted: Thu Mar 05, 2009 7:07 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Sorry All

Pressure of work!!!
Tree would appear to be devoid of thorns at this stage and has reached a height of aprox 10 foot.
As the property is only about 8 years old I would put the age of this tree at around 4 - 5 years

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walltoall
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PostPosted: Thu Mar 05, 2009 10:21 am    Post subject: Do you work in bars or pounds per square inch? Reply with quote

Yo Zimbo,
Your original query was whether the roots would cause damage, so let's get that out of the way. Very few trees grow roots that can do serious structural damage. Those which do are most destructive within about ten feet of the stem. Very thirsty trees can cause subsidence by drying out the ground all around. These are poplars, willows, alders and such trees whose natural habitat is wet ground or even actual water. Your tree is neither type.

The specimen looks like its in the acacia or pseudoacacia families and is so nice-looking that we gotta justify it's staying. Being only five ish years old and growing at over a foot a year it looks like it will continue to grow for some years and become a large tree. Wait til 'Summer' and let's see what kind of 'fruit' it produces behind those flowers. I'm expecting something like a pea pod!

I think the tree may belong to the legume (peas in a pod) family. But whatever it produces let us know. When you have the leaf, flower and seed it is usually very easy to identify.

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MuddyWitch
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PostPosted: Thu Mar 05, 2009 11:49 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Looks like a mimosa to me, but again they have thorns, don't they?

MW

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Sun Starved Zimbo
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PostPosted: Fri Mar 06, 2009 5:42 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hi All

thanks for all this valuable input, I think Walltoal has the right idea, get samples of leaf, flower and pod that way we can eliminate the mutitude and get a real ID on this tree.
For the meantime I am happy to know it as an Acacia lookalike that should not do serious harm to its surrounds, this is one tree that is not going to get the chop...........

Thanks Again

Sun Starved Zimbo
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Roger
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PostPosted: Fri Mar 06, 2009 3:32 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hello,

i could bet that it is a Mimosa (acacia family) we are looking at!

And Mimosas don't have thorns... i lived in the south of France and they are very common there and never saw a thorny Mimosa...

i guess the issue is to know which cultivar you have and that would probably determine the roots/aerial sizes...

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tig
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PostPosted: Sun Mar 08, 2009 9:31 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hi,
The foliage and flower detail makes it look like Acacia baileyana 'Purpurea' to my eyes. It's very similar to Acacia dealbata (commonly known as Mimosa in Ireland), but is less hardy and only makes it in milder area.
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