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Help - New lawn is dying after less than a year


 
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mossfitzg
Rank attained: Hazel Tree
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Joined: 08 Sep 2007
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PostPosted: Fri Jan 23, 2009 1:13 pm    Post subject: Help - New lawn is dying after less than a year Reply with quote

Hi there,

I'm not a first cousin to a gardener but really enjoy the site and I'm hoping someone out there can help.

Early last summer I rotovated, picked stones, and I think, properly prepared for a small new lawn in my back garden in dublin.

I bought roll out lawn, laid it and was very happy with the results, the kids loved it and i thought everything was fine.

Unfortunately as the winter has progressed its begun to deteriorate big time, particularly around the edges. Theres very little grass left within about a yard all the way round and now I'm worried that there will be nothing at all left by this summer.

I have a feeling it might be a drainage problem , although theres no moss the ground is quite soft even after a period without rain. There is guttering on my garage which runs onto the ground in the bottom corner, no access to drain.

Can anyone help ?

Thanks in advance

Moss
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Michael196
Rank attained: Silver Birch Tree
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Joined: 24 Jul 2008
Posts: 194
Location: WEXFORD

PostPosted: Sun Jan 25, 2009 8:22 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

If you feel there is a draining problem then this can be sorted by digging a raiinge pit.

get in a digger if you can and dig down a good 5 feet. dig a retangle of about maybe 5 foot long and 3 or 4 foot wide, or wherever you think the drainage problem is. then back fill with gravel and stones and finally top off again with the original soil.

this is the only way of dealing with draininge issues.

replant the grass seeds in the affected areas and see what happens. I did this afew years ago and problem solved. I nend to do it again in another area where water is ppoling after some site works.
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James Kilkelly
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Joined: 30 May 2006
Posts: 2153
Location: West of Ireland

PostPosted: Mon Jan 26, 2009 2:20 am    Post subject: Re: Help - New lawn is dying after less than a year Reply with quote

mossfitzg wrote:


Unfortunately as the winter has progressed its begun to deteriorate big time, particularly around the edges.


Edges next to walls, or all edges, even those next to beds and borders?

mossfitzg wrote:

Theres very little grass left within about a yard all the way round and now I'm worried that there will be nothing at all left by this summer.


Any pics?

mossfitzg wrote:

I have a feeling it might be a drainage problem , although theres no moss the ground is quite soft even after a period without rain.


Not good, best to stay off it in that condition.

mossfitzg wrote:

There is guttering on my garage which runs onto the ground in the bottom corner, no access to drain.


Possibility of digging a soak pit? Position a water butt in that location even.


Here is a previous thread with some useful links posted by member Verge...... http://www.gardenplansireland.com/forum/viewtopic.php?t=782 , simple aeration for light compaction and the installation of drains for more severe compaction.

Is there a high water table throughout the general district that your house is built in? Or is Your garden lower than the neighbors?

If you have a few pics of your site, I would love to see them, and tell you more.
Pics of the upper soil and the lower subsoil and pics of a test hole.

You can take the pics of the test hole while you carry out a test to see if it is actually your subsoil which is impeading the drainage.
A sample test goes as follows.....

Drainage Test.
Dig a hole approx 1 foot deep.
Fill with water and allow it to drain out completely.
As soon as the hole is empty, refill with water and measure the depth of the water with a tape measure.
After 15 minutes, measure how much the water has dropped in inches, and multiply this figure by 4 to work out how much water drains in an hour.

Less than 1 inch per hour is poor drainage and will mean you require ripping of the subsoil layer.
1 to 6 inches of drainage per hour is fairly ok, this indicates that it may be your topsoil which is compacted. This may have occurred by excessive rolling of the soil or working it while it was wet.

Keep us updated. Wink

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mossfitzg
Rank attained: Hazel Tree
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Joined: 08 Sep 2007
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PostPosted: Wed Jan 28, 2009 11:20 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks for the response, much appreciated.
I think the best thing to do is to take some pics and post them
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