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Redesigned back garden. Would like your suggestions.


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kindredspirit
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PostPosted: Sun Nov 16, 2008 4:26 pm    Post subject: Redesigned back garden. Would like your suggestions. Reply with quote

I had a back garden almost totally grass with an orchard, escallonia and leylandi (I know, I know) hedging with a couple of copper beeches.

That garden has gone to the great garden in the sky and in its place is



The centrepiece is a pond 90 feet long by a max of 30 feet wide. A dividing wall has been put across the narrowest part of the pond; the upper pond is now 3 to 4 inches higher than the lower one and the water flows from the upper to the lower across a gap in the wall. Two pumps pump the water up from the lower pond through filters and UV lights to the upper portion. In the middle of the upper pond is a fountain. (Not a stone fountain, just a jet of water forced up through a rose.)

On the right hand side is a pea gravel driveway giving access to a high garage at the bottom left hand corner of the garden. It then swings around to another garage a third of the way down on the left hand side. This second garage is normal height. The first is very high because it has a two post lift in it.

The pea gravel drive then narrows into a pea gravel walkway back to the house (not shown) at the bottom of the picture. The boundaries of the site are now composed of an old limestone wall at the rear and two new red sandstone walls at each side.

There are two patio areas made from brown Indian Sandstone; the larger of the two with cast iron bollards around a lot of the perimeter. The bollards will be joined with chain when I'm able to source the correct type.

There are 5 areas to be planted with shrubs.

Area A
Area B
Area C
Area D
Area E

Area A has a low (6 inches) brick capped wall in the shape of a half moon in front of it. I want to hide the 20' side of the garage here.

Area B contains a 25' copper beech which appears to be dying for no reason. (It has been dying for two years and no one can tell me why. So this tree looks like it's for the chop. I want to hide the back of the smaller garage with this area.

Area C also has a 25' tall copper beech which is in the best of health, unlike its sibling. The problem here is that everyone has advised me to remove it as it will crack the walls of the pond eventually. The pond is one metre deep and contains a lot of water. I put in a well to supply water to the pond. The well is at the back right of the garden. So, I'm looking for ideas for Area C as well.

Area D is long and narrow and across this area and over the stone wall we can see a lovely local hill and the Galtees from the patios. So I don't want to obstruct these views really. The pond side boundary has a capping of imitation wooden planks (so lifelike that everyone thinks they're real!) and the driveway boundary is composed of railway sleepers.

Area E is bounded by the imitation wooden planks also. I would like to use part of this area to screen the garage at the bottom of the garden as well.


I have ideas of my own but I would appreciate any and every suggestion. (Two, or more, heads are better than one.)
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kindredspirit
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PostPosted: Sun Nov 16, 2008 7:03 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Some pics taken just it got dark tonight. It was also pouring rain so as I've lightened them so they're not good quality.

The water in the lower pond has been lowered 12 inches so I could work on the pumps today.







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BlackBird
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PostPosted: Tue Nov 18, 2008 1:19 am    Post subject: Re: Redesigned back garden. Would like your suggestions. Reply with quote

Wow, fair play to you kindredspirit. real ambition shown in the design. Diy build or landscaper?

kindredspirit wrote:


Area A has a low (6 inches) brick capped wall in the shape of a half moon in front of it. I want to hide the 20' side of the garage here.


Bamboo and/or willow fronted by phormium

kindredspirit wrote:

Area B contains a 25' copper beech which appears to be dying for no reason. (It has been dying for two years and no one can tell me why. So this tree looks like it's for the chop. I want to hide the back of the smaller garage with this area.


Post up a close up pic and maybe we can resolve its ills. Or you could consider planting a weeping birch there.

kindredspirit wrote:

Area C also has a 25' tall copper beech which is in the best of health, unlike its sibling. The problem here is that everyone has advised me to remove it as it will crack the walls of the pond eventually. The pond is one metre deep and contains a lot of water. I put in a well to supply water to the pond. The well is at the back right of the garden. So, I'm looking for ideas for Area C as well.


The beech is not too big to move yet. but where would you put it? Any room in the front garden or any other where? What about building a wall around it below the soil level so that it will have to break through this first to reach the pond wall. About a metre deep should do, and leave a gap of a foot or two between the two walls (new and pond) filled to a depth of 1 metre with drainage stone

kindredspirit wrote:

Area D is long and narrow and across this area and over the stone wall we can see a lovely local hill and the Galtees from the patios. So I don't want to obstruct these views really. The pond side boundary has a capping of imitation wooden planks (so lifelike that everyone thinks they're real!) and the driveway boundary is composed of railway sleepers.


Like yourself I would not obscure the views but i would like to see the site enclosed with planting to make it looks less like you are sitting in a field. Phormiums, grasses and water side shrubs and perennials should give you that wrapped in feeling without removing your views.

kindredspirit wrote:

Area E is bounded by the imitation wooden planks also. I would like to use part of this area to screen the garage at the bottom of the garden as well.


Some dogwoods possibly, or the bridal wreath Spirea.

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kindredspirit
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PostPosted: Tue Nov 18, 2008 7:19 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks Blackbird for an extremely comprehensive reply.

I designed it and then built it with local help. I started way back in February but it has been slow because I got different people to do this and that.

When I have all the shrubs in, I want them to give a spectacular show; shape, varying heights and colour ranges. I want one style to flow into another without it being all bitty and piecey. Thanks very much for your suggestions about the shrubs: I'll look into them.

I'll post up a close-up pic of the dying Beech at the weekend when there is daylight.

I can't move the good Beech now because you can't get a machine in anywhere near it. It would be far too heavy to move manually. I'd thought of building another wall between the Beech and the pond wall but I was told the roots would eventually find their way in underneath it. Your idea of the stones, which I had not thought of, might solve this. Would the infill of stones definitely stop the roots? If they would, then problem solved because I really don't want to loose the tree. I planted it a long time ago.

I'm thinking of going down to the quarry in Kerry where I got the red sandstone to pick out some 6 to 8 feet lengths of rock and then standing two of them upright in the garden area on the right. I suppose I'd have to jack them upright.

Once again, thanks for your suggestions and any more are very welcome.

KS.
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cooler
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PostPosted: Tue Nov 18, 2008 11:39 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

kindredspirit wrote:


When I have all the shrubs in, I want them to give a spectacular show; shape, varying heights and colour ranges.



Other variations of plants on the water side theme to have a look out for kindredspirit are hosta, Iris, Astilbe, candelabra primula, Rogersia and ferns. I know I may get shot down for saying it, but even possibly Gunnera the giant rhubarb.
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kindredspirit
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PostPosted: Thu Nov 20, 2008 6:55 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

cooler wrote:

Other variations of plants on the water side theme to have a look out for kindredspirit are hosta, Iris, Astilbe, candelabra primula, Rogersia and ferns. I know I may get shot down for saying it, but even possibly Gunnera the giant rhubarb.


Thanks Cooler for those.
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Garlicbreath
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PostPosted: Thu Nov 20, 2008 12:11 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Wow! great garden kindredspirit. What about a mountain ash or rowan to hide your garage or one of those birches with the fabulous peeling papery bark (it can't remember the botanic name but maybe someone else can)? On a watery theme how about purple loosestrife (Lythrum salicaria) and marsh marigold (Caltha palustris). Both natives so wildlife friendly. Crocosmia would also work well but it can be a bit invasive. Watermint (Mentha aquatica) could be planted near your patio for its delicious fragrance and pretty mauve flowers.
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kindredspirit
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PostPosted: Thu Nov 20, 2008 5:13 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Garlicbreath wrote:
What about a mountain ash or rowan to hide your garage or one of those birches with the fabulous peeling papery bark (it can't remember the botanic name but maybe someone else can)? On a watery theme how about purple loosestrife (Lythrum salicaria) and marsh marigold (Caltha palustris). Both natives so wildlife friendly. Crocosmia would also work well but it can be a bit invasive. Watermint (Mentha aquatica) could be planted near your patio for its delicious fragrance and pretty mauve flowers.


Crocosmia (Montbretia) looks nice. It grows all over the sides of the roads in West Clare so no need to buy it! Smile
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kindredspirit
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PostPosted: Wed Dec 31, 2008 8:30 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Twenty plastic burger bun trays each containing a cleft water lily now sunk in middle of pond.

About fifteen plastic burger bun trays each containg two bulrushes now sunk at the edges of the ponds.

A mature Pampas Grass sawn into ten sections now planted in Area E. Looking for another mature Pampas Grass to butcher. Smile



Fountains temporarily installed but not in final positions or heights.


Bulrushes.


Cordera Richardii.



View from rear.



View from side.


View from driveway. I haven't finished chains yet. That's a SLOW job.
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kindredspirit
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PostPosted: Mon May 11, 2009 9:21 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Update on how garden is going. Piccies taken last night. Unfortunately I get little time to do the garden but we keep plugging away.















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kindredspirit
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PostPosted: Thu May 28, 2009 9:18 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Latest mad idea, which might interest some of you, is that I've tried to source a Canna, variety "Florence Vaughan" here and in the UK and up 'til now without success. Anyway yesterday, I was able to contact an UK Canna specialist and he is going to split his "Florence Vaughan" into 10 pieces, give them to a local nursery who will sell and post them onto me.

The crazy idea is that I'm going to grow them in 10 inches of water and when they die down in the autumn, I'll leave them underwater and I'll see if they survive until Spring and re-shoot again.

Anyone any experience of Cannas in water?
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Liparis
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PostPosted: Fri May 29, 2009 8:56 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Highly unlikely they will survive. Cannas need a distinct dry season.
Having said that, plants, like animals and kids have the annoying habit of being contrary.
Even if they reapeared the following spring, they will probably be weaker and eventually die.
Bill.

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kindredspirit
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PostPosted: Fri May 29, 2009 11:10 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks Bill.

What I'll do then, is to leave 5 in the water and take 5 out for the winter and store them somewhere frost-free.

(Hedging my bets.)
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Liparis
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PostPosted: Sat May 30, 2009 11:31 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Keep us posted then, I love experiments, i'm partial to them myself.
Is your pond sealed concrete? I love it and am envious of it.
Bill.

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PostPosted: Sat May 30, 2009 9:15 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

That's some "Pond", KINDREDSPIRIT is it child and pet friendly? or is it possible to make something that large safe? The boat and canoe in the pictures will come in handy if you stock it with fish Laughing
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