Irish Gardeners Forum Home
 FAQFAQ   MemberlistMemberlist   UsergroupsUsergroups   RegisterRegister 
 ProfileProfile   Log in to check your private messagesLog in to check your private messages   Log inLog in 
Custom Search
   
Weather Report /
Moon Phase for Ireland

Post new topic   Reply to topic    Irish Gardeners Forum Home -> Garden planning, prep and landscape design in Ireland

Redesigned back garden. Would like your suggestions.


Goto page Previous  1, 2, 3, 4 ... 22, 23, 24  Next  
Most Recent Posts Fountain
Last post: vulkan
The spout!!!
Last post: ponddigger
stream and pond on a sloped site
Last post: ponddigger
Colocasia Alocasia
Last post: vincent71
 
Visit TheGardenShop.ie
Author Message
kindredspirit
Rank attained: Chlorophyll for blood


Joined: 10 Nov 2008
Posts: 2300
Location: Mid-west.

PostPosted: Thu Sep 24, 2009 2:20 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Garlicbreath wrote:
at least dogs can swim... did it get out ok?


16 year old Labrador: He couldn't get out; he was just standing on his hind legs, front paws on the flags so I grabbed his collar and hauled him out.

He's very old, a bit feeble, blind and almost deaf but he still gets around. Nothing wrong with his internal clock. At half past five he's sitting by the back door every day waiting for his grub. He's a real Labrador alright. Smile Smile

_________________
.
.
.
.
A little garden in Co. Limerick.Some non-gardening photographs.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
kindredspirit
Rank attained: Chlorophyll for blood


Joined: 10 Nov 2008
Posts: 2300
Location: Mid-west.

PostPosted: Thu Oct 08, 2009 12:48 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Just a little note on the types of bamboo we've planted.

Hibanobambusa tranquillans shiroshima.

Variegated leaves. Seems to be able to take the wind and two of them are quite happily growing in pots (but would like to escape! )



Pseudosasa japonica .

These are aiming high in the world and we can see that!




Phyllostachys Aureosulcata aureocaulis.

These have golden stems and seem to have taken to their new abode with enthusiasm. It looks like they'll be impressive.




Phyllostachys bissetti.

Planted these as a windbreak at the bottom of the garden. Very green.



Thamnocalamus spathiflorus aristatus.

Where I've planted these doesn't seem to be damp enough for them. Not their fault. Mine! I have to keep watering them almost daily as the water drains away immediately.



Chimonobambusa tumidissinoda.

These are fabulous looking. Big knobbles on the stems. We've only one and it's imprisoned in a pot but its making humungous attempts to escape. It needs a nuclear bunker style root barrier but it's an outstandingly beautiful plant.



We've a couple of other bamboos that we don't know the name of, (gifts from people); one has red stems and looks quite attractive, the other, golden and green stems.

(Pics are of mature specimens - not ours. (We'll have to wait a couple of years.) )

_________________
.
.
.
.
A little garden in Co. Limerick.Some non-gardening photographs.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
kindredspirit
Rank attained: Chlorophyll for blood


Joined: 10 Nov 2008
Posts: 2300
Location: Mid-west.

PostPosted: Sun Oct 11, 2009 4:09 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Planted a row of ferns alongside the north side of our wall on the starboard side.

They're five types as follows,

Polystichum Aculeatum (Hard Shield Fern)

Polystichum Setiferum (Soft Shield Fern)

Polystichum Braunii (smaller type of shield fern)

Dryopteris Affinis (Cristata, the King)

Dryopteris Remota (Scaly Buckler Fern)

Pic below:


_________________
.
.
.
.
A little garden in Co. Limerick.Some non-gardening photographs.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
ormondsview
Rank attained: Silver Birch Tree
Rank attained: Silver Birch Tree


Joined: 17 Jun 2009
Posts: 188
Location: Kenmare, Co. Kerry

PostPosted: Mon Oct 19, 2009 12:20 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Your wall is magnificent. Are they expensive to get built? Stone is such a fine accompaniment to any garden. I was wanting to make an entrance way of stone and was wondering about the cost. Will it be in the hundreds or thousands?
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
sal
Rank attained: Sessile Oak Tree
Rank attained: Sessile Oak Tree


Joined: 15 Sep 2008
Posts: 286
Location: kerry

PostPosted: Mon Oct 19, 2009 9:31 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

my friend in currow,killarney paid 5000 for her roadside front with out gates,they were extra,thank goodness i prefer the natural hedgrow and because of planning permission cant change ot anyway,big conservation thing going here,mind you a few of my neighbours have chose to ignore it,
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
sal
Rank attained: Sessile Oak Tree
Rank attained: Sessile Oak Tree


Joined: 15 Sep 2008
Posts: 286
Location: kerry

PostPosted: Mon Oct 19, 2009 9:42 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

kindred spirit,i have to say your garden is amazing,i`m speechless,you have put an amazing amount of work into it and it truly shows,well done
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Garlicbreath
Rank attained: Silver Birch Tree
Rank attained: Silver Birch Tree


Joined: 28 Oct 2007
Posts: 181
Location: Wexford

PostPosted: Mon Oct 19, 2009 2:54 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

sal wrote:
my friend in currow,killarney paid 5000 for her roadside front with out gates,they were extra,thank goodness i prefer the natural hedgrow and because of planning permission cant change ot anyway,big conservation thing going here,mind you a few of my neighbours have chose to ignore it,


I'm glad to hear hedges are being preserved. I was moaning about all the hedges being levelled around here and the sis informed me that it was a condition of the planning permission that the whole of the hedgrow be flattened and a wall or fence put in! How short-sighted is that? I don't know if this is still the case but even if it's not it's too late for miles of old hedgrows and trees around here Sad Mad Sad
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
kindredspirit
Rank attained: Chlorophyll for blood


Joined: 10 Nov 2008
Posts: 2300
Location: Mid-west.

PostPosted: Sun Nov 08, 2009 5:18 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

How our garden used to look

before the back got pondised. (Is there such a word?) Confused Confused Confused



And the front got Burrenised. Wink Wink Wink





(Those lumps around the bases of the trees are cow manure.)

_________________
.
.
.
.
A little garden in Co. Limerick.Some non-gardening photographs.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
kindredspirit
Rank attained: Chlorophyll for blood


Joined: 10 Nov 2008
Posts: 2300
Location: Mid-west.

PostPosted: Sun Nov 15, 2009 5:57 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

How the back garden looked when I started a year ago.





How it looks today after 1 year. Sorry I'm not faster with the garden but I've an awful lot of irons in the fire and it's difficult to find time for everything. And as you can see, I took away the divisional wall in the middle. Whack, whack, wall gone in 10 minutes. I think the pond looks better without the waterfall wall.





This is a Pagoda, originally intended as a smoking area in a pub, which I picked up cheaply. It still needs 1 metre high iron legs to go under it and which I have been painting today.



These are 4 trays of Loddon Lilies waiting to go into the pond. They're still waiting as I seriously hurt my back lifting the first one into the pond. The weight of them is unbelievable.



This is the first tray of Loddon Lilies that I put in.



This morning I laid down the white cobbles in the gouge out the front. (2½ tonnes! ) I underestimated by two 50 kilo bags, so I'll have to go off tomorrow evening and buy a bit more.







The pots in the middle are Creeping Willow. (This gardening lark never finishes, does it?) Mr. Green Mr. Green Mr. Green Mr. Green Mr. Green

_________________
.
.
.
.
A little garden in Co. Limerick.Some non-gardening photographs.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
kindredspirit
Rank attained: Chlorophyll for blood


Joined: 10 Nov 2008
Posts: 2300
Location: Mid-west.

PostPosted: Sun Dec 13, 2009 12:43 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

This is a list of the plants growing in the pond that I either dug up locally from farmer's fields or nicked from the roadside and a couple that I bought.

Common Bulrush.

Purple Loosestrife.

Yellow Iris.

Pipewort.

Arrowhead.

Bog Myrtle.

Canna. (Florence Vaughan.)

Watermint. (a hitchhiker)

Giant Chain Fern.

Southern Shield Fern.

Arum Lily.

Unidentified long grass that grows in local watercouses. (I'm delighted with these.)

Loddon Lily.

Water Lily.

Flowering Rush.


Other hitchhikers, blanket weed and parrotfeather. When I find these, they're immediately sent into orbit over the back wall. They're a little persistent, though.

Over the winter I will be planting 8 varieties of seeds and I'm going to try and grow these in the pond. I may be successful but possibly not.

They are

Hibiscus Galaxy.
Hibiscus Palustris.
Hibiscus Militaris.

Astrantia Major.

Baptisia Australis.

Cimicifuga Racemosa.

Filipendula Ulmaria.

Rodgersia Pinnata.


Has anyone any of these growing in their pond and do you find them successful? (Or did they slowly rot away?)

I'm open to all suggestions about plants that I can grow in the water.

_________________
.
.
.
.
A little garden in Co. Limerick.Some non-gardening photographs.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
kindredspirit
Rank attained: Chlorophyll for blood


Joined: 10 Nov 2008
Posts: 2300
Location: Mid-west.

PostPosted: Mon Jan 04, 2010 8:45 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Pic of one of the fountains as at 4th of January. (Bit cold here!)



Pic on the 9th of Jan. (Temp got down to -11.6°C one night! )


_________________
.
.
.
.
A little garden in Co. Limerick.Some non-gardening photographs.


Last edited by kindredspirit on Tue Jan 12, 2010 1:35 pm; edited 1 time in total
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
sal
Rank attained: Sessile Oak Tree
Rank attained: Sessile Oak Tree


Joined: 15 Sep 2008
Posts: 286
Location: kerry

PostPosted: Tue Jan 05, 2010 9:42 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

like the fountain,actually like all of it,it makes my back garden look like a scrap yard cum tip
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
kindredspirit
Rank attained: Chlorophyll for blood


Joined: 10 Nov 2008
Posts: 2300
Location: Mid-west.

PostPosted: Wed Feb 24, 2010 7:25 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

sal wrote:
like the fountain,actually like all of it,


Thanks for your kind comment Sal but actually at the moment, it seems that half the plants are black mush from the continual frost. Crying or Very sad

Methinks I've been pushing the envelope too much here! I had been told that New Zealand plants were suitable for the Irish climate. Uh! Uh! Wrong! Mad

_________________
.
.
.
.
A little garden in Co. Limerick.Some non-gardening photographs.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
Lucinda
Rank attained: Hazel Tree
Rank attained: Hazel Tree


Joined: 13 Feb 2010
Posts: 3

PostPosted: Sun Feb 28, 2010 7:56 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Kindredspirit your garden is amazing. I hope that your plants come through - when will you be opening for guided tours? Very Happy
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
kindredspirit
Rank attained: Chlorophyll for blood


Joined: 10 Nov 2008
Posts: 2300
Location: Mid-west.

PostPosted: Mon Mar 15, 2010 7:32 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

To take my mind off the Armageddon in the plant dept after the frosts, I'm building a pagoda.

Lifted it up a metre the other day and vertical panels have been inserted into five of the sections; the sixth section will be the entrance.

On three of the sections I'll probably be making up three stained glass inserts and putting them above the vertical panels. Each glass insert will be only 25% stained glass and the other 75% will be clear glass. Two sections will more than likely be left open on top and the entrance will be left open as well. (Well, that's the plan, anyway.)


_________________
.
.
.
.
A little garden in Co. Limerick.Some non-gardening photographs.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
Display posts from previous:   
Post new topic   Reply to topic    Irish Gardeners Forum Home -> Garden planning, prep and landscape design in Ireland All times are GMT
Goto page Previous  1, 2, 3, 4 ... 22, 23, 24  Next
Page 3 of 24

 

Jump to:  
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum
You can attach files in this forum
You can download files in this forum


Powered by phpBB © 2001, 2005 phpBB Group

Privacy Policy | Copyright © 2006 - present IrishGardeners.com (part of GardenPlansIreland.com)