Irish Gardeners Forum Home
 FAQFAQ   MemberlistMemberlist   UsergroupsUsergroups   RegisterRegister 
 ProfileProfile   Log in to check your private messagesLog in to check your private messages   Log inLog in 
Custom Search
   
Weather Report /
Moon Phase for Ireland

Post new topic   Reply to topic    Irish Gardeners Forum Home -> Irish Wildlife, Irish Wild flowers and nature gardening.

Harvesting Bees


 
Most Recent Posts funny
Last post: Margo
2016 Vegetable quizz.
Last post: Sue Deacon
oops
Last post: Margo
Skimmia seed wanted
Last post: Brendankearns
 
Visit TheGardenShop.ie
Author Message
evoke
Rank attained: Hazel Tree
Rank attained: Hazel Tree


Joined: 30 Sep 2008
Posts: 21

PostPosted: Thu Nov 13, 2008 10:05 pm    Post subject: Harvesting Bees Reply with quote

How anyone got in experience in running a beehive. I started to have an interested in them. the only problem is that i do not know anyone that does this aswell. I am a complete begineer at it. I just want a small hive to begin with to see how i get on.

Is it expensive to start? Like are we talking about over €200 just to get started.

What are potential problems. I have a garden to put them where they will not harm anyone. Just talking about the potential risk of the queen dying before the hive even starts..

Thanks for the replys.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Sive
Rank attained: Chlorophyll for blood


Joined: 18 Apr 2008
Posts: 1731
Location: Co.Wexford

PostPosted: Fri Nov 14, 2008 10:13 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I think all your questions will be quickly answered if you look for your local association of bee-keepers. It is by far the best way to get started. You may not realise how many bee-keepers there are around you. In north Wexford where I am, there are 75 around the Gorey area alone, and they give classes through the winter and also practical lessons in one of the member's home.
www.irishbeekeeping.ie should give you a good start
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
medieval knievel
Rank attained: Chlorophyll for blood


Joined: 03 Sep 2007
Posts: 1008

PostPosted: Fri Nov 14, 2008 12:03 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

am planning on doing the beekeeping course in dublin - i think it starts in the new year, and is in or around leeson street somewhere.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
James Kilkelly
Rank: Site Admin


Joined: 30 May 2006
Posts: 2142
Location: West of Ireland

PostPosted: Fri Nov 14, 2008 1:30 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

medieval knievel wrote:
am planning on doing the beekeeping course in dublin - i think it starts in the new year, and is in or around leeson street somewhere.


Would that bee Laughing ....
Beekeeping for Beginners in Dublin.

County Dublin Beekeepers Association

commences Tuesday 3rdFeb.2009

9 weeks with outdoor demonstrations at our Apiary at
St. Columba's College

cost: € 100

Contact County Dublin Beekeepers Association
email..... cdbka(at)dublin.ie.
Change the (at) for @

_________________
Gardening books.

http://www.allotments.ie/ Ireland's allotments.
On Twitter... http://twitter.com/Allotments

Garden Consultation & Design.

Try my Garden Design home study course!
.
.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
ormondsview
Rank attained: Silver Birch Tree
Rank attained: Silver Birch Tree


Joined: 17 Jun 2009
Posts: 185
Location: Kenmare, Co. Kerry

PostPosted: Sat Jan 08, 2011 9:46 am    Post subject: facts about bees Reply with quote

Foraging honeybees fly at
fifteen miles per hour, flapping their wings at a ridiculously fast
230 beats per second, and cover an average territorial radius of one
to two miles--but will travel as far as six to eight miles from the
nest. Bees may gather as much as fifty pounds of nectar per day and
produce two to three hundred pounds of honey per year (honey is
regurgitated nectar that bees have concentrated to over 80 percent
sugars by fanning their wings to evaporate excess water). One pound
of honey requires fifty-five thousand miles of flight (one gallon
requires one million miles) and the visitation of two million
flowers. One teaspoon of honey represents the lifetime work of
roughly a dozen bees (worker honeybees live, on average, six weeks
longer in winter). Known as the "angels of agriculture," bees also
pollinate ninety major commercial crops, the equivalent of
approximately $15 billion in agricultural production and one of
every three mouthfuls of our food consumption.

source: THE WISDOM OF BEES by Michael O'Malley, Ph.D.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
BeeWrangler
Rank attained: Hazel Tree
Rank attained: Hazel Tree


Joined: 13 Feb 2011
Posts: 7
Location: New Brunswick Canada

PostPosted: Mon Feb 14, 2011 4:40 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

make shure to clean out the queen cells, they look kind of like a peanut sticking out of the brood frame. If you over look one and a new queen comes out, chances are good the hive will swarm. You can take the frame with the queen cell on it and start a nuc if the hive is strong, 3 brood frames and two honey frames works well, make shure there is lots of pollen in the other two brood frames you take. This will expand your hives. I nuc once a year
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Display posts from previous:   
Post new topic   Reply to topic    Irish Gardeners Forum Home -> Irish Wildlife, Irish Wild flowers and nature gardening. All times are GMT
Page 1 of 1

 

Jump to:  
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum
You can attach files in this forum
You can download files in this forum


Powered by phpBB © 2001, 2005 phpBB Group

Privacy Policy | Copyright © 2006 - 2016 IrishGardeners.com (part of GardenPlansIreland.com)