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Fungii on my lawn and i dont live in dingle


 
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wheres me trowel
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PostPosted: Tue Oct 21, 2008 7:08 pm    Post subject: Fungii on my lawn and i dont live in dingle Reply with quote




So many questions so little time for a novice.

These fellas have turned up on my lawn. I live beside a wood .

I dont mind them and they are not in a traffic area especially this time of year.

(1) What should i call them first
(2) Should i remove them i.e will they spread
(3) if i should remove them will i simply lift them or apply something
(4) is their existence here telling me something about the ground, soil quality, drainage etc

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walltoall
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PostPosted: Tue Oct 21, 2008 10:03 pm    Post subject: there is not mushroom for toadstools here Reply with quote

Call in the restaurants! You have a crop of Clitocybe geotropa (trooping funnel) which normally thrive in damp, rich soil in and near woods and associated open spaces and is often found in rings. It 'ripens' September to November. The caps should be from 4" to 8" across when fully formed , domed at first but developing a depression later. The gills are narrow and crowded and the same colour as the top, this colour varying from yellowish through grey to light brown. The length of the stem is the same as the width of the cap but paler in colour. This mushroom is considered very good to eat when young but light on flavour. The stems are fibrous and normally discarded. If they are half the size I said above they are common funnel and still eminently edible.
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Sb
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PostPosted: Wed Oct 22, 2008 10:41 am    Post subject: Re: Fungii on my lawn and i dont live in dingle Reply with quote

wheres me trowel wrote:

(4) is their existence here telling me something about the ground, soil quality, drainage etc


Mushrooms often appear in a lawn like this if you have rotting wood or dead tree roots in the soil. I guess if you found them beneath the mushrooms then removed them the mushrooms would lessen at least.
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PostPosted: Wed Oct 22, 2008 12:32 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

wheres me trowel, article on the topic here Lawn Mushrooms
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walltoall
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PostPosted: Wed Oct 22, 2008 1:17 pm    Post subject: There ain't much room here for edible toadstools Reply with quote

Dear Verge and all. I'm obliged for the link to the "on-site" article on 'lawn' mushrooms, which I've now studied in detail. It's unfortunate that such a prestigous gardening site presents what I perceive to be a very negative tone on fungi. Firstly there is no such beast as a 'lawn' mushroom. Each different species has it's own name and characteristics. The picture of the 'lawn mushroom' in the link is actually a picture of Coprinus atramentarius which is commonly attracted to mulch beds and is not only non-poisonous but eminently edible.

It is of the same family as the Shaggy Ink Cap which will be making it's appearance soon on wet lawns and which I regularly pick from the public park near my house, watched with avid interest by passing neighbours who wonder "wink! wink" if I'm cornering the local market in free halucegens "wink!wink!". The fact that I am the local neighbourhood watch co-ordinator confuses them 'cause it is not an ethical thing for such an eminence to be picking his highs from the local park.

Mushrooms which grow on cultivated lawns are almost all safe and attempts to eradicate them with chemical warfare will do far more damage than good. If you get mushrooms on the lawn, identify them with a good book. My basic reference is a Blandford Mini-guide the size of a fag packet, ISBN 0 7137 1211 2 named rather obviously "Mushrooms and Toadstools" which has served me well for a quarter century.

Country people will tell you that "Mushrooms always grow in fields where horses live". Country people are rarely wrong when it comes to country matters. The spores of [b]Agaricus campestris[/b] are attracted to the horse-manure. It's life cycle is enhanced by the said horses and has been since time immemorial. Let us not throw away good food especially in these straitened times. Almost all mushrooms and fungi are edible.

There is one group though (Aminata) which contains "Death Cap", "Destroying Angel" and "Panther Cap" all of which can and do kill humans. Why not Google these three and have a look-see for yourself? The one you are likely to see (in public parks especially near beech and oak) is Death Cap. It has a faint sweet and sickening SMELL when mature.

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wheres me trowel
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PostPosted: Wed Oct 22, 2008 10:54 pm    Post subject: Thanks waltoall,Sb and Verge for the info Reply with quote

Thanks waltoall,Sb and Verge for the info. Maybe there's a tree stump down there that wouldn't surprise me. I suppose I should prefer to think that they are trooping funnel rather than common funnel. I don't think im going to eat them sorry walltoall. Thanks Walltoall for the info on the deathcap, I read the wikipedia entry on it I never knew there was a substance growing that poisonous in Ireland. I'm just forming my gardening philosophies and this incidence has really added to that and thanks to all for yer contributions.
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PostPosted: Thu Oct 23, 2008 9:06 am    Post subject: Your dinner is on the lawn Reply with quote

There won't be a tree stump below the funnels, Where'sMeTrowel. From the photo evidence, the fungi are widely spread across the lawn. Looking at the lush greenery and the fact you have apple trees nearby suggests that 'woodland edge' can't be far away. On my copy of your photo-post the two pictures have very different colour resolutions so it is hard for me to choose the variety.

Trooping Funnel will spread across your hand. Common Funnel would sit in the middle of it. Both are edible and have a very very mild taste. If I remember rightly funnel can be dried out like the porkinis you find in delicitessens and which you pay through the nose for.

Thats why I suggested you tell your local restaurant. They would kill for fresh funnel straight from the field and you would have the warm glow that you were recycling something which is useless to you but gold to someone else. lol

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PostPosted: Thu Oct 23, 2008 2:56 pm    Post subject: Re: There ain't much room here for edible toadstools Reply with quote

walltoall wrote:
Firstly there is no such beast as a 'lawn' mushroom. Each different species has it's own name and characteristics. The picture of the 'lawn mushroom' in the link is actually a picture of Coprinus atramentarius which is commonly attracted to mulch beds and is not only non-poisonous but eminently edible.


Thats all well and good for you walltoall who knows about mushrooms, but what about the mother who wants to let her child play on the lawn which has mushrooms growing on it. Which may or may not be poisonous. Am I willing to take the chance and leave them there to injure my children or pets? As far as I am concerned if it is on a lawn it is a lawn mushroom and a lawn being a closely clipped area of grass is no place for a mushroom. You wont find mushrooms growing in the centre spot of old trafford. Mushrooms can have their place in my garden but in the long grass areas.
I never had mushrooms growing in my lawn but for wheres me trowel I have heard that an application Sulphate of Iron will dissuade them.
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wheres me trowel
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PostPosted: Sat Nov 08, 2008 2:08 pm    Post subject: Fungi gone Reply with quote

I got the gloves out and removed the fungi two weeks ago. I then dissolved sulphate of iron (5 euro) in water and watered in area. 1 teaspoon into 5 liters of water that amount into about a meter sq area. Brought the hose out to lawn to keep filling the can and moved four sticks to get my rough meter square. Took a couple of hours but there has been no more fungi since and as a bonus the lawn is a deep rich green. Its much cheaper than lawn weed and feed but it doesn't feed, i read it contains no nutrients for the lawn. I wonder will they be back next september. Thanks again to all.
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PostPosted: Sun Nov 09, 2008 8:46 pm    Post subject: Where's your mushroom trowel? Reply with quote

If you have provided a sufficiently hostile environment for fungi, then they won't come up again. UNLESS, nature itself is able to undo your efforts. Have you considered what effect the treatment might have on the wider environment under your turf? There are myriad life forms in good soil and many of them are fungal!

Glad my lead on the deathcap was useful. Other dangerous items and much more common in Ireland are foxglove (digitalis) deadly nightshade (belladonna), John's Worth, cotoneaster berries and 'rose-hips' can make children sick or very sick. And finally green skin potatoes.

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PostPosted: Tue Jan 20, 2009 12:37 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

With mushrooms in the lawn, or in the garden beds, I tend to think of them as a badge of honor soil-wise.

Certainly a golf course won't want them on a green.

But at a home, I'd rather have a few growing and shriveling.

Couldn't look worse than some brown leaves in autumn.

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