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plants with large spines or thorns


 
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rathfuadagh
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PostPosted: Tue Oct 14, 2008 9:56 am    Post subject: plants with large spines or thorns Reply with quote

Hi,
I am looking for plant names with very large thorns or spines to plant as hedging. I am looking for some interesting plants.
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walltoall
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PostPosted: Tue Oct 14, 2008 10:18 pm    Post subject: Spines Reply with quote

Here's a right vicious one: berberis atrocarpa See GPI's post further down for native options. I also go with Dr. Sunny's suggestion about firethorn. There is a downside to pyrocantha though. It tends to self-seed all over the place within about three years of introduction!

WHOLE NEW BALLGAME
I would not use berberis in a truly rural setting and especially not on a boundary. Cattle will just walk straight through Atrocarpa. (Thick hides!)
My approach now I know what "rathfuadagh" really wants/needs is to concentrate on hawthorn, with occasional pyrocantha and wild dog roses if you like a bit of colour. The real challenge is that stuff that keeps cattle at bay is slow to develop. You could stick sally slips in the ground about four foot apart and as many hawthorn slips as you can find in the hopes that most may strike before going dormant. Its a long shot but you've nothing to lose. You can go out right now and collect rose-hips to get dog-roses going.

[Roses may be propagated from hips by removing the seeds from the aril (outer coating) and sowing just beneath the soil surface. In a cold frame or a greenhouse, the seeds take at least three months to germinate but they should be showing by St. Patrick's Day 2009.]

I would also start some holly even though it will be at least five years before it starts to work. Here's a useful page from the Northern Ireland wing of an organisation I work with. It's not for the faint-hearted but holly is for the long haul and so presumably are you.http://www.toof.org.uk/recipes/holly/index.html

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Last edited by walltoall on Thu Oct 16, 2008 7:54 pm; edited 8 times in total
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Sive
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PostPosted: Wed Oct 15, 2008 10:41 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

It all sounds very nasty....who or what are you trying to impale on all these thorns, rathfuadagh?
Roses are fairly vicious plants!
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James Kilkelly
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PostPosted: Wed Oct 15, 2008 11:56 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

rathfuadagh, don't forget our native plants when looking for spines and thorns for your hedge.... Hawthorn, Blackthorn, Dog Rose, and Holly
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Dr. Sunny Thomson
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PostPosted: Wed Oct 15, 2008 12:19 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Pyracantha, mentioned a few times on the forums, do a search for it in the search box. Also rosa rugosa, and many berberis as mentioned by walltoall
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rathfuadagh
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PostPosted: Thu Oct 16, 2008 2:38 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hi,
I need a windbreak around my fruit bushes so it it needs to be cow proof as most of the shrub / tree will be in the farmers field as I only have a foot my side of the fence in this part of the garden (farmer dosn't mind)I have pyracantha and the natives and the berberis atrocarpa sounds interesting but Ineed more.
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James Kilkelly
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PostPosted: Fri Oct 17, 2008 9:09 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

rathfuadagh, it is worth noting that none of these spiney hedging plants are stock proof in their early years.
Just because a young plant has spines will not prevent it from being clamped by an animals mouth and pulled up along with its unestablished roots.
Expect to fence these off for +/- 5 years at a distance greater than the animals reach until they become rightly stockproof.

As another plant suggestion, you could include a few rambler roses dotted along the base of the hedge for thorns and cascades of blooms during the summer.

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rathfuadagh
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PostPosted: Sat Oct 18, 2008 10:08 am    Post subject: thorns Reply with quote

Hi,
Thanks for the suggestions I have decided on
Pyracantha various colours
Holly various types
Blackthorn
Various roses (from Aldi)
Rubus Lasiostylus (ghost bramble)and other brambles
Colletia Paradoxa (crucifix tree)
Japanese Quince
Sea buckthorn
Hawthorn various types
Gorse

Hopefully this will give me loads of colour from flowers ,berries/hips ,leaves and stems.



The troublesome hedge is 70ft long so I should fit it all in
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walltoall
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PostPosted: Sat Oct 18, 2008 1:13 pm    Post subject: noble hadge Reply with quote

Excellent mix although I'd have used furze instead of gorse, but then that's th rebel in me! lol
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rathfuadagh
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PostPosted: Sat Oct 18, 2008 3:04 pm    Post subject: spiky hedging Reply with quote

Hi,

Walltoall I have never heard of Furze what is it ?
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walltoall
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PostPosted: Sat Oct 18, 2008 3:26 pm    Post subject: furze gorse whin Reply with quote

It's a Catholic version of Gorse.

Whin is another version but I think it has orange flowers . LOL.

But these days one can't be sure.

Roscommon used to be covered with furze when I was a nipper.

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sandra12
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PostPosted: Sat Oct 18, 2008 4:35 pm    Post subject: Re: furze gorse whin Reply with quote

walltoall wrote:
It's a Catholic version of Gorse.



Does that mean gorse would work better given its better work ethic. Laughing

rathfuadagh wrote:
Thanks for the suggestions I have decided on ......Colletia Paradoxa (crucifix tree)


Not sure this would survive a cold Irish winter if we were to get one. Worth thinking twice about it, as you may also find it difficult to source.
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walltoall
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PostPosted: Sat Oct 18, 2008 10:33 pm    Post subject: furzy gorse Reply with quote

I never thought of that aspect. You definitely have a point there. Furze could definitely learn a trick or two from whin. As for the other, I dunno. Look at the mess we're in over here in gorseland.
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