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obtaining seeds


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elphin
Rank attained: Hazel Tree
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Joined: 15 Sep 2008
Posts: 14
Location: Co. Roscommon

PostPosted: Mon Oct 06, 2008 4:10 pm    Post subject: obtaining seeds Reply with quote

sorry if this is in the wrong forum! Where do you all buy your seeds from.
I am looking for some Dierama and Aganapathus, see them on some websites but they do not send to Ireland. Can you advise me Shocked
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walltoall
Rank attained: Orchard owner


Joined: 25 Aug 2008
Posts: 705
Location: Thurrock RM15 via Dungarvan and the Banner County

PostPosted: Mon Oct 06, 2008 7:14 pm    Post subject: dierama Reply with quote

Thompson & Morgan sell a variety pack for about £4 and they warn that dierama are tempermental after sowing. If T&M sell the seeds they should be gettable from your local garden centre!

Sow February to June or September to October on the surface of lightly firmed, moist seed compost in pots or trays. This seed is small so after sowing, do not exclude light as this helps germination. Keep the surface of the compost moist but not waterlogged; germination can take 21-40 days. Keep at a temperature of between 15-29C (60-85F). When large enough to handle, transplant seedlings into 7.5cm (3in) pots or trays. Aftercare: For best results, plant in a sunny-semi shaded position in a deep, fertile, well-drained soil. Once established plants do not like to be disturbed.

Does this help you at all?

The other thing you are looking for is actually African Lily. Its Latin/Greek name is AGAPANTHUS. They grow from corms and in England are usually sold growing in a pot

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elphin
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Location: Co. Roscommon

PostPosted: Tue Oct 07, 2008 9:28 am    Post subject: seeds Reply with quote

Many thanks for your help. I will have a look on their website.
I just love these plants and want to add them to my perennial border if possible.
regards.
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Dr. Sunny Thomson
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Joined: 23 Aug 2006
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PostPosted: Tue Oct 07, 2008 11:10 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

This Irish supplier does various forms of perennial seeds. They may do Dierama. Seedaholic
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stanmake
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PostPosted: Wed Oct 14, 2009 7:53 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hi, I was on their site last night and bought loads of seeds. They had a fair few agapanthus (I bought a white one) but I didn't see Dierama.
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AJ
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PostPosted: Wed Oct 14, 2009 8:02 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Always buy my seeds direct from T&M, don't know why, just habit at this stage I suppose. Find them a very good company to deal with, prompt efficient service, on the very odd occassion might be out of stock of a particular seed, but it does arrive soon after the main order, only ever had one problem with one packet of seeds and it was replaced without question. All in all a great service company, can recomend them highly.
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walltoall
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Location: Thurrock RM15 via Dungarvan and the Banner County

PostPosted: Wed Oct 14, 2009 8:17 pm    Post subject: Thompson and Morgan Reply with quote

Thanks AJ, my sentiments exactly. T&M have never let me down in 30 years.
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dinahdabble
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PostPosted: Thu Oct 15, 2009 4:49 pm    Post subject: Obtaining seeds. Reply with quote

This is my method

1) stake out the garden, and find out when the occupants are in and when they are not.

2) accurately map the garden scetching it quickly on the back of an old receipt or something. Carfully mark the plant you have noticed with an X. Investigate plant in horticultural book at the local library, re: when it is time to harvest, and how long the pods can be left on the plant, what the seeds look like etc.

3) Be sure to take account of how fast the family dog can move from one side of the house to the other.

4)Choose a dry day/night.

5)Sneek up to the door and knock - what? :shock: you didn't expect I'd nick them did you??

6)tell owner you couldn't help admire the garden, and how much work must have gone into it etc. etc.

7) pop the question, best to phraze it "could I buy a few seeds off you" they will probably say "oh, no, no - take some by all means" but if they don't you can always offer them a quid. :wink:
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walltoall
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PostPosted: Thu Oct 15, 2009 11:11 pm    Post subject: gettin seeds for nuttin Reply with quote

Well, dinahdabble, I can find no fault whayever in your logic. There's an old Irish proverb, excuse my rusty blas that goes "muna gcuireann tú san t-Earrach, ni bhainfidh tú sa bFomhair", basically 'you reap what you sow'.

Well it's a load of oul cobblers that proverb, because left to its own devices a garden can be both devious and productive. I've begged, stolen, borrowed and liberated seeds all my life apart from purchasing T&M when all else fails, but my latest wheeze (running since about 2004) beats brannigan. I let plants seed theirselves and if they succeed I stay outa the way and let them get on with it. I've a constant vigil going. Every time I weed, I watch. If something looks like it might grow into something useful I let it be. If I'm not taken by it, I pull it up on first sight.

Only a month ago, I was going round with my knife necking pissabeds, sorry dandelions (They, and some of their mates, have considerably better tenure than the grass on my lawns and I find capital punishment far with a sharp knife is better than arguing the lease with diaquat.). I noticed this unusual tuft on a very shaded bit of the lawn. I would not have even seen it if I mowed the lawn diligently and often.

It wasn't grass. Now, almost a month later, I can report that it is probably a baby yucca. There's a big brother, about three years old, elsewhere in the garden self seeded and a mature specimen which went in when the house was new some ten years ago.

There's an avocado the seed of which was unearthed when I turned a compost heap last spring. I found the seed with a bulge in the side and recognised it from a year previously when it was going out to the compost. In this case I potted it up as a one-off. It is well beyond the 10leaf stage now in mid-October and I've glass-housed it for the winter.

Verbena is another opportunist. Her indoors sowed a couple many years ago but they did not really take. Then just after they 'vanished' I started noticing this new weed, which in short turned out to be self-seeded. I left a few to their own devices and now we have this wonderful display in all sorts of nooks and crannies and I am weeding out maybe 20 seedlings a week, but leaving the odd one.

I've a constant supply of feverfew, flat-leaf parsley, tomatoes, blackberries. This year I'd a Summer supply of iceberg lettuces,turning up in all sorts of nooks and crannies by letting one go to seed last year. I was hospitalised for a long period when I might have collected the seed and when the NHS finally ejected me the original was long gone.

So if I get a knock on the door someday, dinahdabble, I'll know it's yourself. I can let you have onion sets, garlic, sunflower, parsley, radishes and a whole lot of strange seeds mostly left behind from exotic fruits we get in Waitrose.

Call by if you're passing.

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dinahdabble
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PostPosted: Fri Oct 16, 2009 11:49 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Yes indeed, the seed gathering offer is reciprocal, and that goes for everyone who reads this. :lol: What to do with extra plants and seed is an interesting problem. There are always lots more seeds than will fill the garden.

The saying about 'not making hay on a windy day' is also mistaken, because 'if you are growing grass for animal feed, it's probably best to spread the seed...'

One of the frustrations of being a person who loves vegitatation is that you never quite manage to cover the entire world in a thick blanket of plants - or is it already covered in a thick blanket of plants with holes in it?? - thats the "glass half full and glass half empty" saying... I think, rather, it's the rate of drainage/drinkage, unraveling, desertification or dandilion domination that's significant, but I can't think of an appropriate saying to demonstrate the principle, so I'll let you work on that one... :?
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sal
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PostPosted: Fri Oct 16, 2009 12:19 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

yes,i tend to save seeds but couldn`t possibly use them all,at the moment i`ve taken all the dead heads off my chocolate smelling cosmia or cosmos,i bought 3 in the summer,one is the original and the other 2 hybrids called choca mocha,now they may or may not grow but i`m giving it a go ,perhap advice as to sow would be good?and if any one wants a dead head posted to them pm me,i have other deadheads too,not bothered for returns but if you have something spare i will welcome it,
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dinahdabble
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PostPosted: Fri Oct 16, 2009 7:16 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Also, try some of the seed-swaping websites. There are quite a few now. The one I have used in the past is called Garden Swap Shop:
http://gardenswapshop.co.uk
If I lived nearer to a post box I would probably use this site a lot more. If anyone knows of any other sites that swap seeds, perhaps you could list them too.
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forest flame
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Joined: 17 Jun 2008
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Location: DUBLIN

PostPosted: Sat Oct 17, 2009 6:29 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

hi all
this year i grew runner beans for the first time.i was in the garden today tidying up and got a load of seeds from the pods that were left hanging on the plant.they are lovely to look at being purplish in colour.
i put them in a paper bag and am wondering would they be okay to plant out next spring.
incidentally there are loads if anyone wants any.
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michael brenock
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PostPosted: Sat Oct 17, 2009 10:03 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

the seeds should be alright as long as they were not grown from F1 hybrids. Take the seeds out of the pods and dry in a warm dry place and store in an airtight jar until next Spring.in a cool place, Dry first cool later.
michael brenock horticultural advisor (retired)
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sal
Rank attained: Sessile Oak Tree
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Joined: 15 Sep 2008
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Location: kerry

PostPosted: Sun Oct 18, 2009 3:59 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

thanks,have joined seed swapshop Very Happy
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