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Growing Roses - The Top 5 Mistakes Most People Make.


 
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James Kilkelly
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PostPosted: Wed Sep 03, 2008 12:37 pm    Post subject: Growing Roses - The Top 5 Mistakes Most People Make. Reply with quote

Growing Roses - The Top 5 Mistakes Most People Make.
By David LeAche

Growing roses is both an art and a science: as my gardening aunt used to say, "...it's six of one and half a dozen of the other!"
As a rose grower myself and author of a gardening website, I get many questions about why a certain rose bush has failed or what a person might be doing wrong. Over time, these many mistakes people make, began to fall into five major categories.

The five major rose growing mistakes that most people could avoid!

Exclamation 1. Planting in the wrong location:

Before you actually dig the hole for your new rose bush, consider the location. It will need six hours of good light including some time in the sun. It will need healthy soil where water drains well and other plants and trees haven't taken over with their own roots. Not in the shade of a large tree, or over a concrete pipe or in a pot small enough for a geranium! Take time to choose the right location.

Exclamation 2. Choosing the wrong bush in the first place:

My rose bush, Savoy Hotel, grew so large I had to move the neighbors fence! The estimated size was actually on the label when I purchased it, so check how big it will get and plan the space accordingly. Rose bushes are programed to grow to a certain size, not necessarily the height you want, so check the labeling carefully.

While doing this check, look up the hardiness of the particular rose. Not all roses survive harsh frost! Some are very susceptible to certain diseases such as blackspot, and guess what, some rose bushes only bloom once a year!

Check these things out BEFORE you purchase.
Type of rose, color, scent, size at full growth, hardiness and blooming time: make your choices before you plant, not after.

. Sally Holmes Climbing Rose, photo / picture / image.

Exclamation 3. Pruning at the wrong time of year:

I have an acquaintance who continues to question why her roses don't bloom: even though, every year she cuts out all the new growth as it tries to bud, because this new growth blocks her view out of her living-room window. Pruning at the correct time will promote growth and increase blossom production.

Climbers should be pruned in autumn and trained to travel where you want them to travel. Autumn is the time to train your climbers, not the spring, because all you would be doing is removing the new shoots that produce the new stems and the new blossoms.

Hybrid Teas and minis that have a repeat blooming, get cut back in early spring and just given a short haircut in autumn to prevent wind damage during the winter. This cut back in spring promotes new growth and helps you to re-shape the bush.

Bushes that don't re-bloom such as most Old Growth Roses, get pruned right after the blossoms fade, sometimes after the hips have formed if you like to encourage the hips to grow: perhaps as late as autumn. Pruning at the correct time will produce a healthier bush and a lot more roses!

Exclamation 4. Not knowing exactly what you planted:

You will not have much success with one, two or three above if you haven't dealt with this one, and you would be surprised how many people tell me "...I don't remember the name....and I can't for the life of me find the metal tag....are you sure there was one?"

All roses come with a name tag and if they don't, go buy them somewhere that does!
Keep the tag on the bush and make a note of what it says, then in a year or two when you need an answer to a question about something that has gone wrong you can look it up and people like myself can help you.

Not knowing if the bush is a climber or a Polyantha, Rosa Mundi or Queen Elizabeth, makes a lot of difference. Knowing the name means you can check with your National or local society about the likely growing characteristics of your plant: knowing what it should be doing goes a long way to solving most problems.

Exclamation 5. Not tending to the W.F.D:

Of course, I know of several beautiful roses that have spread themselves along twenty feet or more of stone wall, and produced arm-loads of fabulous roses every year while getting no attention whatsoever: even abuse from passing car exhausts. But if you are going to be successful, don't fall into the trap of ignoring the W. F and D!

Water, Food and Dead-heading, all play their part in rose growing 101 and you ignore them at your peril. Mistake number five, ignoring the W. F and D chores.

Water deeply at least twice a week. Put down organic rose fertilizer in early spring and early summer. Liquid fertilize every week or two and keep the rose clean of dead blooms otherwise the bush thinks it's finished for the season and go dormant, produce hips, and get completely confused. Keep the roses coming by removing the old faded ones. Your rose bush wants to make more babies....encourage it to do so!

If you tend to your rose garden and avoid these five major mistakes, the chances are high that your bushes will flourish and your roses will be the envy of your family and friends. Growing roses will have it's reward if you take notice of the five mistakes.

Growing roses just got easier.

David LeAche is the author of http://www.rose-works.com where you can find out all about rose growing, photographing roses, crafts with roses and using petals, hips and rose-water. FREE monthly newsletter. Find out how this website came to be so popular by visiting http://www.rose-works.com/about-us.html

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dublintimmy
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PostPosted: Thu Feb 05, 2009 10:31 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thank you for taking the time to type all that out. It is very useful information.
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polly
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PostPosted: Wed Feb 10, 2010 11:13 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I have just transplanted a rambler rose 'American Pillar', which is about 15ft tall. Now my question is should i reduce its top growth ? I was reluctant to do this as it is a 'rambler'.
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James Kilkelly
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PostPosted: Wed Feb 10, 2010 1:18 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Polly, it is worth noting the following with trees/plants with a lot of mass above ground.......... that you can reduce the water loss required to support lots of stems/leaves by cutting some of them off cleanly.
This diverts the reduced water supply of the transplant into core survival rather than the support of massed leaves/stems.
this is preferably carried out before the transplantation, but I have also carried it out after with success.
Your transplant will start off in its new home with a lighter load to support.
You are in essence balancing the top to the roots
Their leaves and stems will later regrow.

Don't forget to prune out any diseased, dead or dying branches/leaves after 6 months, then at monthly intervals if they show up.
Be aware that even with the best of care and good root growth that your transplant may not show much growth until its roots reach their original spread prior to transplantation.

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polly
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PostPosted: Wed Feb 10, 2010 8:47 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks again for your help James. I would usually trim back so that roots can become established, but i had read somewhere that pruning climbers and ramblers should be avoided because many are climbing sports from bush varieties and hard pruning may cause them to revert !! Thanks again, i'm out tomorrow to chop chop !!
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katana
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PostPosted: Sat Mar 06, 2010 12:57 pm    Post subject: Thanks for useful info Reply with quote

Thanks for all the info' James.
I have roses dotted around my boundary and in other places in the garden.
The info' you have given explains everything that is going wrong with them.
I have purchased some in lidi ( They are bare root and were cheap) in the last week and now Hopefully I will have more success with them .
I will make sure to keep the names of them.
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Daithic
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PostPosted: Sun Jul 01, 2012 9:52 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks for that compact aide memoir for taking care of roses. I wanted to add though that there is a distinction between climbers and ramblers from what I have read and what I have experienced.

Ramblers tend to flower once a year and should be pruned/trained when the flowers have gone over, taking side shoots back to 3-4buds. This can be done as early as July if the flowers gave finished.

Climbers, on the other hand, behave more like their bush relatives insofar as they can have repeat flowering so deadheading these is useful in terms of getting more flowers and extending the flowering time. I tend also to leave pruning later, and it is reasonable to prune most modern climbers in the same way as bush roses.

To tell if you have a climber or a rambler is usually straightforward, the label is the first obvious place but the flowering habit is probably the biggest clue. This though, means you need to wait until you know your plant's habit so a quick way is to inspect the base, most ramblers produce their stems below or at ground level whereas many climbers produce from a central 'stump' which may be just below ground or above.

One other common difference is the flower type, many ramblers are more like, or in fact are, species roses, so the flowers tend to be smaller and more open, e.g., like the dog rose you may see in the rural hedgerows.

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