Irish Gardeners Forum Home
 FAQFAQ   MemberlistMemberlist   UsergroupsUsergroups   RegisterRegister 
 ProfileProfile   Log in to check your private messagesLog in to check your private messages   Log inLog in 
Custom Search
   
Weather Report /
Moon Phase for Ireland

Post new topic   Reply to topic    Irish Gardeners Forum Home -> Perennials, Ferns and Ornamental grasses

What exactly is a PERENNIAL


 
Most Recent Posts ...What did you do Today...
Last post: Ado 2
Garlic problem
Last post: Greengage
funny
Last post: ponddigger
Introduce yoursellf to whom.......................
Last post: Keeks
 
Visit TheGardenShop.ie
Author Message
James Kilkelly
Rank: Site Admin


Joined: 30 May 2006
Posts: 2142
Location: West of Ireland

PostPosted: Mon Jul 31, 2006 5:57 pm    Post subject: What exactly is a PERENNIAL Reply with quote



A perennial plant or perennial (Latin per, "through", annus, "year") is a plant that lives for more than two years.
Herbaceous perennials are plants that do not form woody tissue and woody perennials are plants that develop a woody base or root system from which the foliage and flower stems grow.
The term perennial more commonly describes herbaceous perennials, since woody plants (i.e., trees and shrubs) are always perennials.
Perennials that flower and fruit only once and then die are termed monocarpic or semelparous.
However, most perennials are polycarpic, flowering over many seasons in their lifetime.

In warmer and more clement climates, perennials grow continuously. In seasonal climates, their growth is limited to the growing season.
For example, in temperate regions a perennial plant may grow and bloom during the warm part of the year, with the foliage dying back in the winter. These plants are deciduous perennials.
Regrowth is from existing stem tissue. In many parts of the world, seasonality is expressed as wet and dry periods rather than warm and cold periods.
In some species, perennials retain their foliage all year round; these are evergreen perennials.

With their roots protected below ground in the soil layer, perennial plants are notably tolerant of wildfire.
They are also less subject to extremes of cold in temperate and arctic winters, with less sensitivity than trees or shrubs.

Perennial plants dominate many natural ecosystems on land and in fresh water, with only a very few (e.g. Zostera) occurring in shallow sea water.
They are particularly dominant in conditions too fire-prone for trees and shrubs, e.g., most plants on prairies and steppes are perennials; they are also dominant on tundra too cold for tree growth.
In forests, perennial plants are of secondary importance to trees and shrubs, but are often still abundant on the forest floor.

Perennial plants are usually better competitors than annual plants, especially under stable, resource-poor conditions.
This is due to the development of larger root systems which can access water and soil nutrients deeper in the soil and to earlier emergence in the spring.

Examples of evergreen perennials include Begonia and Sedum.

Examples of deciduous perennials include goldenrod and mint.

Examples of monocarpic perennials include Agave and some species of Streptocarpus.

This article is licensed under the GNU Free Documentation License http://www.gnu.org/copyleft/fdl.html It uses material from the Wikipedia article http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Perennial

_________________
Gardening books.

http://www.allotments.ie/ Ireland's allotments.
On Twitter... http://twitter.com/Allotments

Garden Consultation & Design.

Try my Garden Design home study course!
.
.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
MargeSimpson
Rank attained: Rowan Tree
Rank attained: Rowan Tree


Joined: 04 Aug 2006
Posts: 110
Location: somewhere in the west

PostPosted: Thu Sep 14, 2006 10:01 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
Perennials that flower and fruit only once and then die are termed monocarpic or semelparous.

GPI, this line confuses me a little. Plants that flower/fruit once then die, could that not describe an annual or an ephemeral?
(I have just started my RHS cert and I just read the plant classification section so the line above makes me think that I haven't fully understood what I just read. I hope you don't mind me asking?)
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
James Kilkelly
Rank: Site Admin


Joined: 30 May 2006
Posts: 2142
Location: West of Ireland

PostPosted: Wed May 02, 2007 6:40 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Marge, just noticed this post by you now.
A bit late I suppose.

MargeSimpson wrote:
Quote:
Perennials that flower and fruit only once and then die are termed monocarpic or semelparous.

GPI, this line confuses me a little. Plants that flower/fruit once then die, could that not describe an annual or an ephemeral?


Not if if the plant in question took three years or more to go from growing, to flower then fruit/seed, then death.

_________________
Gardening books.

http://www.allotments.ie/ Ireland's allotments.
On Twitter... http://twitter.com/Allotments

Garden Consultation & Design.

Try my Garden Design home study course!
.
.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
Display posts from previous:   
Post new topic   Reply to topic    Irish Gardeners Forum Home -> Perennials, Ferns and Ornamental grasses All times are GMT
Page 1 of 1

 

Jump to:  
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum
You can attach files in this forum
You can download files in this forum


Powered by phpBB © 2001, 2005 phpBB Group

Privacy Policy | Copyright © 2006 - 2016 IrishGardeners.com (part of GardenPlansIreland.com)