Irish Gardeners Forum Home
 FAQFAQ   MemberlistMemberlist   UsergroupsUsergroups   RegisterRegister 
 ProfileProfile   Log in to check your private messagesLog in to check your private messages   Log inLog in 
Custom Search
   
Weather Report /
Moon Phase for Ireland

Post new topic   Reply to topic    Irish Gardeners Forum Home -> Vegetable growing, fruit and allotments in Ireland

How To Grow BlueBerries - One Of The Top 10 Super-Foods.


Goto page Previous  1, 2, 3  Next  
Most Recent Posts Back in Business
Last post: tagwex
Weed Identification
Last post: Keeks
Elstar and discovery apple
Last post: Greengage
Help please.. holm oak problems
Last post: Greengage
 
Visit TheGardenShop.ie
Author Message
Import
Rank attained: Hawthorn Tree
Rank attained: Hawthorn Tree


Joined: 20 Sep 2008
Posts: 57

PostPosted: Sat Sep 27, 2008 6:16 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

What with living in an estate with a postage stamp size garden, can one get a blueberry tree with 2 or more varieties grafted onto the root stock?

I have a pear tree grafted with 2 varieties and it yields very well.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Sive
Rank attained: Chlorophyll for blood


Joined: 18 Apr 2008
Posts: 1731
Location: Co.Wexford

PostPosted: Sat Sep 27, 2008 7:09 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I believe you can grow blueberries successfully in pots, so maybe that would be your best option.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
walltoall
Rank attained: Orchard owner


Joined: 25 Aug 2008
Posts: 706
Location: Thurrock RM15 via Dungarvan and the Banner County

PostPosted: Sat Sep 27, 2008 7:10 am    Post subject: "Import" blueberry graftings Reply with quote

Yo! Import. Nice to meet another postage stamp gardener!
Sive's POT option IS the practical solution. However .... please make sure that you have variable cultivars as per a previous post. Serious gardening, particularly on a postage stamp is far from random. You can graft blueberry to wild rootstock and you can graft two (or more) types. But unless you are going to make a few euro by selling them on it's not worth the bother to do one. The technique is not rocket science. I learned how to do it in the 50s from Laddie DeJong in Lusk using the grafted bud technique. This link shows a different method. I think either would work with vaccinium

http://aggie-horticulture.tamu.edu/propagation/inlay/inlay.html

You're unlikely to find an already-grafted specimen because I bet no-one has bothered. People nowadays know very little and grafting techniques have retreated to universities and such. And anyway this here forum is mostly about knowledge transfer and passing on and receiving skills.

You may have opened a window of opportunity for yourself as a supplier of multi-grafted blueberries. There may be a five year lead in, but shucks the recession will last that long so we might as well be doing something.

Below is an extract from a (Japanese university) trial which I found at http://sciencelinks.jp/j-east/article/200615/000020061506A0491897.php.

Abstract;
"The possibility of using wild blueberry [Vaccinium bracteatum Thunb.] as a rootstock for cultivating Northern Highbush blueberry in a warm region was investigated. The survival ratios of three different cultivars ('Berkeley', 'Bluecrop', and 'Earliblue') grafted on 3-year-old rootstock were 85.7 to 100%. Furthermore, 41 cultivars included in highbush rabbit-eye blueberries were successfully grafted on seedlings of Shashanbo rootstock. There were no signs of incompatibility even four years after grafting, and anatomical observations of graft unions supported this result. The shoot growth and fruit weight of 'Earliblue' grafted on seedlings of Shashanbo rootstock were significantly higher than those of plants on their own roots. However, the shoot growth of 'Earliblue' grafted on rooted cuttings of rabbit-eye blueberries ('Homebell' and 'Tifblue') was significantly higher than that of those on seedlings of Shashanbo rootstock. In addition, there were no differences in concentrations or component ratio of sugars and organic acids on any rootstock. These findings suggest that Shashanbo has graft compatibility with blueberry and that seedlings could be used as a rootstock for cultivating northern highbush blueberries in southern Kyushu. " (author abst.)
public domain and acknowledged Go For It.

_________________
Retired trouble-maker. twitters @walltoall and dreams of being promoted to Pedunculate Oaker.


Last edited by walltoall on Fri Apr 17, 2009 7:43 pm; edited 1 time in total
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
Organicgrowingpains
Rank attained: Silver Birch Tree
Rank attained: Silver Birch Tree


Joined: 24 Aug 2008
Posts: 175
Location: Cork

PostPosted: Sat Oct 18, 2008 5:53 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hi wallitall, I followed your advice and have moved the blueberries.You can see the finished result on www.organicgrowingpains.blogspot.com blog. I still have not got around to uploading photos on this , an endevour I will try to master for the winter!
Thanks to admin and everyone for the advice too!

_________________
Always learning!
http://www.organicgrowingpains.blogspot.com
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
walltoall
Rank attained: Orchard owner


Joined: 25 Aug 2008
Posts: 706
Location: Thurrock RM15 via Dungarvan and the Banner County

PostPosted: Sat Oct 18, 2008 11:00 pm    Post subject: Glad to be of help Reply with quote

Feng shued blueberries should work nicely. Gosh your blog spot is terrific and the photos are stunning. I went right down the whole blog to the end. Cobh brought back memories to me of seeing relatives off in the 50's. My grandfather went out of Cobh on the Teutonic in 1909 and died in America. It's a long story. By the bye, you were worried about the shrubs getting pot-bound. I have a fig eight feet high with a spread of about fifteen living in a stone pot against the house. I was told to do it that way by an old boy near here. he said if I let the fig grow free it would dedicate itself to growth and give miserable returns. As long as you keep yours ericated (is that a word?) I think they'll be fine so long as they pollinate ok. Best of luck with the garden. You do go to a lot of trouble but you'll reap the reward.
_________________
Retired trouble-maker. twitters @walltoall and dreams of being promoted to Pedunculate Oaker.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
Organicgrowingpains
Rank attained: Silver Birch Tree
Rank attained: Silver Birch Tree


Joined: 24 Aug 2008
Posts: 175
Location: Cork

PostPosted: Sun Oct 19, 2008 8:53 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hi wallitall,I put up the photos firstly to remind us that we are progressing in some way and hopefully they will benefit somebody else also.It is also a wayof keeping track of what grew and what did'nt !
Roll on next year! If you go on to the Ellis island website and put in your Grandfather's name or the name of the ship you will get up the sailing log and info on it.Its a great site.

_________________
Always learning!
http://www.organicgrowingpains.blogspot.com
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
rosemary
Rank attained: Hazel Tree
Rank attained: Hazel Tree


Joined: 31 Oct 2008
Posts: 3
Location: Co. Kerry

PostPosted: Fri Oct 31, 2008 11:53 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I'd love to grow blueberries in my windswept Kerry garden. Would they cope with the salty air? Would I need to make the soil even more acid than it is?

Thanks in advance, Rosemary
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Organicgrowingpains
Rank attained: Silver Birch Tree
Rank attained: Silver Birch Tree


Joined: 24 Aug 2008
Posts: 175
Location: Cork

PostPosted: Fri Oct 31, 2008 2:12 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hi Rosemary, I think they need a sunny sheltered site. Judging by the proliferation of rhododendrons and peat bogs in Kerry the soil is probably acid enough. There is a great blueberry thread and advice on here and admin have also lots of advice on as well, but salty air I am not sure about?Like anything in gardening, have a go anyway you could confound all the experts!
_________________
Always learning!
http://www.organicgrowingpains.blogspot.com
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
walltoall
Rank attained: Orchard owner


Joined: 25 Aug 2008
Posts: 706
Location: Thurrock RM15 via Dungarvan and the Banner County

PostPosted: Fri Oct 31, 2008 4:40 pm    Post subject: Blueberry pie Reply with quote

Hi Rosemary!
If you can find 'hurts' growing in the vicinity of heather near where you are you can grow blueberries. If you are unsure about the word 'hurts' ask someone much older than yourself. Here's to the Kingdom!
SW

_________________
Retired trouble-maker. twitters @walltoall and dreams of being promoted to Pedunculate Oaker.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
Yorky
Rank attained: Silver Birch Tree
Rank attained: Silver Birch Tree


Joined: 17 Apr 2007
Posts: 196

PostPosted: Sun Apr 12, 2009 12:38 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I've just bought a blueberry bush for the first time (picture attached). I'm going to fgrow it in a container - what size should the container be? At present it's about 2ft tall and in a 7 inch pot. Also, is it imperative that ericaceous compost be used rather than organic peat free fruit & vegetable growing compost?

I read that they will fruit better if another variety is planted. Does this apply to container bushes also? The existing type is Goldtraube

Also, I had a problem last year with birdseating all of my gooseberries and note that blueberries are also susceptible. I was thinking of making a wooden frame covered with chicken wire which can be placed over the bushes when needed and then lifted off. Is this a good idea? If so what gauge of chicken wire should be used.

Thanks in advance.

PS Attempted to attach photograph but The Attachment is too big.
Max Size: 256 KB
. The photograph is only 1Mb-the lowest possible setting!
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
verge
Rank: Chief Moderator


Joined: 04 Jun 2006
Posts: 598
Location: Ireland

PostPosted: Sun Apr 12, 2009 12:48 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Yorky wrote:


PS Attempted to attach photograph but The Attachment is too big.
Max Size: 256 KB
. The photograph is only 1Mb-the lowest possible setting!


Resize.
Just a few of the possible methods.

Method (1) Without installing anything extra provided you have "Paint" as part of your windows package.

Right click on the picture you wish to "shrink".
Then left click EDIT on the menu that appears.
If you have "Paint" installed this should now take you to that package.

You will then see your image sitting in the editing panel.

Left click the IMAGE button at the top of the screen, then left click STRETCH/SKEW from the drop down.
In the panel that appears you will see the stretch dimension on the horizontal and vertical are set to 100%.
Alter both the horizontal and vertical to your needs, say for example try 50%.
Left click OK and your image is reduced.

Finally left click FILE followed by SAVE AS to allow you to save the image under whatever name you wish, preferably some different to the original file name to prevent you overwriting your originals.

Method (2) Use Microsofts Image Resizer
Info about it: http://www.microsoft.com/windowsxp/using/digitalphotography/learnmore/tips/eschelman2.mspx
Down load link: http://download.microsoft.com/download/whistler/Install/2/WXP/EN-US/ImageResizerPowertoySetup.exe

Method (3) Use PIXresizer - Free Image Resizer
Info on, with download link near bottom of page: http://bluefive.pair.com/pixresizer.htm

More info here http://www.gardenplansireland.com/forum/about32.html

_________________
How to post pics on the forum.

Benefited from us? Then link to us or tell others.

http://www.allotments.ie/ Ireland's allotments.
On Twitter... http://twitter.com/Allotments
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Liparis
Rank attained: Orchard owner


Joined: 23 Sep 2007
Posts: 651
Location: Co. Meath

PostPosted: Sun Apr 12, 2009 2:26 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

This is a very interesting thread on growing Blueberries. However, I'm concerned about some extremely misleading information.
First of all, and I think I touched on this in another thread, cultivars are not hybrids, they never were and never will be. We start confusing cultivars with hybrids and we're in trouble, serious trouble! A cultivar is nothing other than what it says, a cultivated plant of a particular species or hybrid. For example, the Blueberry cultivars, no matter how many cultivars being spoken of are not different hybrids, they may be the same hybrid but each showing a difference in fruiting, for example. They may produce a yellow or black fruit, but it's still the same species or hybrid, but just a variety of it.
The analogy of the Jennet and Mule causes to further confuse this matter, it had no place being used to decribe what a cultivar is, it's very clearly a hybrid, the hybrid being a cross between two completely different species i.e. Equus africanis, the Donkey or Ass and Equus feris, regardless of whichever subspecies you choose for the mating.
The Oxslip adds further confussion. The Oxlip (Primula elatior) is an endangered species and not a hybrid between the Primrose ( Primula vulgaris) and the Cowslip (Primula officinallis). The first give-away is in the name. If it was a hybrid, the 'e' in elatior would be in upper case not lower case.
The names Oxslips and cowslips come from a similar background. Not oxe's lips or cows' lips as many believe, but from Ox slips and cow slips, from the old English for oxanslyppe and cuslyppe, reffering to cow pats and ox pats, the plants were often found growing in the region of cow's pats or slips.
In 1842 Henry Doubleday confirmed that Oxlips were in fact a seperate species by close observation and subsequent "genetic" testing, i.e. he pollinated and grew plants from seed. Within the wild population there was insufficient variation to claim they were hybrids. The basic of genetics being that cross one parent with another will give you a progeny in a ratio of 25:50:25 or in other words, 25% will closely resemble the mother (seed bearer in this case), 50% will be a mixture of both parents and 25% will closely resemble the father (pollen parent). At the same time he sent seed samples to Charles Darwin who carried out his own tests and confirmed the Oxlip as a totally different species from the Cowslip and Primrose. If the Cowslip was a hybrid, then pollinating an Oxslip with an Oxslip would produce progeny with such a variety in characteristics very few if any would resemble either parent. The ratio would completely change. However, being a species, the progeny breed true.
Before offering up an argument of such, it's extremely important to recognise the very important differences between Genera, Species, Variety and Cultivar, otherwise we are in danger of misleading, confusing and badly educating our young and up-coming gardeners.
While many Blueberries grown in cultivation may well be hybrids of the numerous species of North American shrubs, they are in no way the same species as the European Bilberry or as it's known in Scotland, blaeberry or deerberry, Vaccinum myrtillus. The gist is, don't confuse species with variety, the irish Bilberry is not a variety of the North Amercan Blueberry.
Bill.

_________________
Earth is the insane asylum of the Universe.

http://www.species-specific.com/orchid-forum/
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
Yorky
Rank attained: Silver Birch Tree
Rank attained: Silver Birch Tree


Joined: 17 Apr 2007
Posts: 196

PostPosted: Sun Apr 12, 2009 3:31 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Any chance of a specific reply to my query?
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
verge
Rank: Chief Moderator


Joined: 04 Jun 2006
Posts: 598
Location: Ireland

PostPosted: Sun Apr 12, 2009 4:16 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Yorky wrote:
Any chance of a specific reply to my query?


Have you read the first post on this thread to seek a specific reply to your queries.

_________________
How to post pics on the forum.

Benefited from us? Then link to us or tell others.

http://www.allotments.ie/ Ireland's allotments.
On Twitter... http://twitter.com/Allotments
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
mojorex
Rank attained: Hazel Tree
Rank attained: Hazel Tree


Joined: 06 Apr 2009
Posts: 22
Location: Kerry

PostPosted: Thu Apr 16, 2009 12:12 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

had blueberries in my pancakes last night they were delicous!
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Display posts from previous:   
Post new topic   Reply to topic    Irish Gardeners Forum Home -> Vegetable growing, fruit and allotments in Ireland All times are GMT
Goto page Previous  1, 2, 3  Next
Page 2 of 3

 

Jump to:  
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum
You can attach files in this forum
You can download files in this forum


Powered by phpBB © 2001, 2005 phpBB Group

Privacy Policy | Copyright © 2006 - present IrishGardeners.com (part of GardenPlansIreland.com)