Irish Gardeners Forum Home
 FAQFAQ   MemberlistMemberlist   UsergroupsUsergroups   RegisterRegister 
 ProfileProfile   Log in to check your private messagesLog in to check your private messages   Log inLog in 
Custom Search
   
Weather Report /
Moon Phase for Ireland

Post new topic   Reply to topic    Irish Gardeners Forum Home -> Vegetable growing, fruit and allotments in Ireland

What Vegetables to Sow Now for Winter and Spring.


 
Most Recent Posts Garlic problem
Last post: Greengage
funny
Last post: ponddigger
Introduce yoursellf to whom.......................
Last post: Keeks
I'm new here
Last post: tagwex
 
Visit TheGardenShop.ie
Author Message
James Kilkelly
Rank: Site Admin


Joined: 30 May 2006
Posts: 2142
Location: West of Ireland

PostPosted: Sat Aug 09, 2008 12:52 am    Post subject: What Vegetables to Sow Now for Winter and Spring. Reply with quote

What Vegetables to Sow Now for Winter and Spring.
by GPI

What vegetables could you be eating from you garden right now, if you had remembered to sow it earlier on in the season? Well pest, disease and weather permitting you could be tucking into Aubergine, Beans (Broad/French/Runner), Beetroot and leaf beet, Broccoli, Cabbage, Cauliflower, Carrots, Courgettes, Cucumber, and Marrow. I'm not finished yet; you also could be sampling your own Shallots, Spinach, Tomatoes, Peas, Potatoes, Radish, Chard, Garlic, Kohl rabi, Leeks, Lettuce, Onions, and Turnips.

You will be either settling down each evening to a feed of this healthy, traceable and if grown organically, pesticide free food, or else you will depressed that you once again missed the boat as the sowing and harvesting times passed you by for another year. All is not lost though; there is still time for plenty more veg sowing.

Remember the old Chinese proverb "Fool me once, shame on you, fool me twice, shame on me." Now is your chance, prevent yourself from missing out again and becoming that fool by sowing some vegetable seeds over the coming weeks. Let's have a look at what's available for you to sow as we look towards autumn, winter and spring harvests.

Arrow Winter Lettuce.
Winter lettuces are cold-hardy varieties, ideal for sowing after mid-summer. Provided they are given a bit of protection from frosts in a polytunnel, cold frame or cloche, you will be able to harvest right on through the winter.

My suggested variety is "Winter Gem" for sowing September - March, and harvesting October - May. With it you might just be able to enjoy a salad in the snow.

Arrow Turnips.
Turnips also known as Swedes, are versatile late vegetables high in vitamin C and fibre. They are also quick to mature and both their roots and green tops are edible. My suggested late turnip variety is "Purple Top Milan" for sowing outdoors up until the end of August, and harvesting from the end of October onwards. Think of how good those sweet turnips will taste in a winter stew.

Arrow Carrots.
There is still time to sow carrots outside allowing pulling as tender specimens in autumn or as frost-sweetened beauties in winter. I suggest the variety "Autumn King 2" for sowing in August and harvesting as early as October. Its long tapering roots are full of flavour and very high in vitamin A.

. Sow now for an early crop of peas in spring, photo / pic / image.

Arrow Peas.
For an extra-early crop of peas in spring you can sow a round seeded variety outdoors now, and also in September and October. I suggest the hardy dwarf variety "Meteor" which crops well even in exposed situations.

If you are growing and harvesting peas at the present, it may seem that they will never stop cropping, but believe me they will. So think ahead and get started on sowing for next years crop.

Arrow Onions.
Sow seed straight into soil now, and again in September for early spring salad onions or scallions as I call them. The variety I suggest is "White Lisbon" as it is tolerant of a cold winter, should one arrive. Pop the seeds in now, and you could be frying up a pan of these green onions this Christmas.

Arrow Chard.
Also known as everlasting spinach or beet spinach, this is not really spinach at all. It is actually a form of beet, whose leaves can be used as a "cut and come again" vegetable with the same edible properties of true (harder to grow) spinach. I suggest you sow the variety "White Silver" for high fibre leaves over winter and through to next spring.

So there we go, that's lettuce, turnips, carrots, peas, onions and beet spinach just to name a few of the vegetables to keep your garden and your belly full over the months to come.
Any queries or comments on What Vegetables to sow now for winter and spring, please post below.

_________________
Gardening books.

http://www.allotments.ie/ Ireland's allotments.
On Twitter... http://twitter.com/Allotments

Garden Consultation & Design.

Try my Garden Design home study course!
.
.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
coolaboola
Rank attained: Hawthorn Tree
Rank attained: Hawthorn Tree


Joined: 03 Aug 2008
Posts: 65

PostPosted: Mon Aug 11, 2008 11:30 am    Post subject: Thanks GPI Reply with quote

Thanks GPI! I was wondering what I could be doing now, apart from fantasy garden planning for next spring.

How about garlic? I'd love to have a go at growing my own (never tried before). I've read it takes a long time to grow and so should be sown in autumn. Is it a bit early yet to sow?

Where in Dublin could I get suitable seed/cloves (I don't want to plant the supermarket varieties)?

And what are my chances of success planting in containers (and if containers are a no-go, would they be at all dog-proof?)?
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
James Kilkelly
Rank: Site Admin


Joined: 30 May 2006
Posts: 2142
Location: West of Ireland

PostPosted: Mon Aug 11, 2008 1:38 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

coolaboola wrote:


How about garlic? I'd love to have a go at growing my own (never tried before). I've read it takes a long time to grow and so should be sown in autumn. Is it a bit early yet to sow?


November would be ok to sow your garlic alright coolaboola
Bulbs need the cold of the winter to encourage them to split into new garlic bulbs.
I find the old method of sowing on the shortest day (Dec 21st) and harvesting on the longest day (June 21st) to be quite ok as well.
I can't see any real problem with sowing a bit earlier than November apart from the fact that you may you may get some premature shoots only to be tipped back by frosts.
So in short, don't plant your garlic bulbs until the first frosts arrive to be safe.

coolaboola wrote:

Where in Dublin could I get suitable seed/cloves (I don't want to plant the supermarket varieties)?


Any garden centre worth its salt should have Garlic bulb for sale from november, Unwins seeds supply many garden centres with their garlic bulbs.
Why do you not want to plant the supermarket varieties coolaboola?

coolaboola wrote:
And what are my chances of success planting in containers (and if containers are a no-go, would they be at all dog-proof?)?


Garlic will do better in the ground as it is prone to drying out in containers through too little watering, leading to poor bulb formation.
But water regularly and you will solve that.
Garlic usually grows very tall, so combine that with being already elevated in a container and you could get some wind damage as well.

Informative garlic growing tutorial here..... Grow garlic.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
coolaboola
Rank attained: Hawthorn Tree
Rank attained: Hawthorn Tree


Joined: 03 Aug 2008
Posts: 65

PostPosted: Mon Aug 11, 2008 3:44 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks GPI, that's great info.

I'll hang on til November so (my birthday's the end of November so I'll buy me some garlic cloves as a pressie to myself!)
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
ian
Rank attained: Ash Tree
Rank attained: Ash Tree


Joined: 22 Jun 2007
Posts: 234
Location: Tallaght

PostPosted: Mon Aug 18, 2008 7:17 pm    Post subject: seed potatoes for Christmas Reply with quote

Hi GPI,
i want to have new potatoes for Christmas dinner so I am looking for seed potatoes to plant in September. Do you know where I might get one ? Do you know anyone in North Dublin potato Growers organisation, tried to contact them but to no avail not sure if this is the right name as I can get a listing for them in the white pages.
Regards,
Ian.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
Blowin
Rank attained: Orchard owner


Joined: 20 Aug 2008
Posts: 678
Location: Drimoleague, Co Cork

PostPosted: Fri Aug 22, 2008 6:16 am    Post subject: Seed Potatoes Reply with quote

You may find www.ipm.ie useful. I've never tried them but intend getting next season's Orla and Colleen from them when the time comes.
_________________
A novice gardener on newly cultivated, stoney ground.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Sive
Rank attained: Chlorophyll for blood


Joined: 18 Apr 2008
Posts: 1731
Location: Co.Wexford

PostPosted: Fri Aug 22, 2008 12:24 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks for the ipm website, Blowin, I'll definitely investigate that for next year's crop. Isn't it strange how, as September approaches, a gardener's mind is already tuning into NEXT spring! Full of good intentions, and hoping for better weather too.....it's called Eternal Optimism!
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
spider
Rank attained: Hawthorn Tree
Rank attained: Hawthorn Tree


Joined: 06 Feb 2008
Posts: 63
Location: west ireland

PostPosted: Fri Aug 22, 2008 8:35 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

carrotts,turnips,peas,onions, even potatoes .Learn something new every day always thought after july was too late for sowing any veg,So now i dont have to wait for spring to start planting again.
how about a post on autum sowing flowers types and sowing conditions
since i have a greenhouse now
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
ian
Rank attained: Ash Tree
Rank attained: Ash Tree


Joined: 22 Jun 2007
Posts: 234
Location: Tallaght

PostPosted: Sat Aug 23, 2008 7:18 pm    Post subject: Potato Seed Reply with quote

Thanks for the tip Blowin, i'll call them Monday and see if they have seed for this time of year, will let you know how I get on
Regards, Ian.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
James Kilkelly
Rank: Site Admin


Joined: 30 May 2006
Posts: 2142
Location: West of Ireland

PostPosted: Sun Aug 24, 2008 11:38 pm    Post subject: Re: seed potatoes for Christmas Reply with quote

ian wrote:

i want to have new potatoes for Christmas dinner so I am looking for seed potatoes to plant in September.


If you have no luck sourcing the seed Ian there is a possibility of using small potatoes from a local farmer or those saved from your own crop.
See this article....... How to grow new potatoes for Christmas.

_________________
Gardening books.

http://www.allotments.ie/ Ireland's allotments.
On Twitter... http://twitter.com/Allotments

Garden Consultation & Design.

Try my Garden Design home study course!
.
.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
My Potatoes
Rank attained: Pedunculate oak tree


Joined: 27 Feb 2013
Posts: 307
Location: Cork

PostPosted: Mon Jul 01, 2013 5:17 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks for this post. I did some googling and most of the articles were for polytunnel crops.
Got my Winter Gem and Purple Top Milan yesterday, and I've got some Autumn King 2 somewhere in my seed box.
I've the month of July to harvest to make room.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
Display posts from previous:   
Post new topic   Reply to topic    Irish Gardeners Forum Home -> Vegetable growing, fruit and allotments in Ireland All times are GMT
Page 1 of 1

 

Jump to:  
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum
You can attach files in this forum
You can download files in this forum


Powered by phpBB © 2001, 2005 phpBB Group

Privacy Policy | Copyright © 2006 - 2016 IrishGardeners.com (part of GardenPlansIreland.com)