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burgeoning urban garden


 
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medieval knievel
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PostPosted: Wed May 21, 2008 8:41 pm    Post subject: burgeoning urban garden Reply with quote

this is about a 270 degree panorama of a garden i've been helping with, and unfortunately makes the planting look smaller and less verdant than it looks in reality - the other 90 degrees is missing as it's a work in progress patio area at the moment.



the plum tree (in front of the last fence panel on the left) is putting on a lot of bushiness up top, which seemed to start last year in reaction to a bad infestation of aphids which was hard to shift - should we cut the branches back in winter?
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cooler
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PostPosted: Thu May 22, 2008 9:03 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Some nice curves there. Good cluster of trees in the corner. Birch or hawthorn? Ties on trees may possibly need to be raised and resecured as a few seem to have dropped. Don't know if you are a fan of phormiums but I would include a few myself.
On the plum, I may be corrected but I think the safest time for pruning the plum is summer to avoid silver leaf disease
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James Kilkelly
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PostPosted: Thu May 22, 2008 9:39 am    Post subject: Re: burgeoning urban garden Reply with quote

medieval knievel wrote:


the plum tree (in front of the last fence panel on the left) is putting on a lot of bushiness up top, which seemed to start last year in reaction to a bad infestation of aphids which was hard to shift - should we cut the branches back in winter?


Article on the subject here medieval knievel....... How to prune a plum tree in Ireland.

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greenman
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PostPosted: Thu May 22, 2008 11:09 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Nice garden and cool panorama. What did you use to do that, did you need a tripod?
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BlackBird
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PostPosted: Thu May 22, 2008 12:25 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Looks good. I love the yellow plant on the middle left, any idea what it is. Seeing as other posters are making suggestions (hope you dont mind medieval knievel) I would include a few conifers. Not leylandiis of course. And some pyracanta for the fences. Smile
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medieval knievel
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PostPosted: Thu May 22, 2008 3:15 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

cooler wrote:
Good cluster of trees in the corner. Birch or hawthorn? Ties on trees may possibly need to be raised and resecured as a few seem to have dropped.

from left, the 'trees' are chilean potato plant, kilmarnock willow, plum, stella cherry, ceanothus (sp?), birch, birch, ceanothus, apple (cox's pippin, i think), berberis, apple (granny smith).

the photo is a stitched panorama using autostitch - basically, you take photos which overlap, and this software:
www.autostitch.net
will automatically stitch them together. no tripod required.
it obviously warps perspective - the garden is about 20 foot wide and 40 foot long, but the full 40 foot is not visible in the above.

i'll have to revert to my gardening partner for the name of the yellow flowering plant.
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James Kilkelly
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PostPosted: Thu May 22, 2008 4:40 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

medieval knievel wrote:

from left, the 'trees' are chilean potato plant, kilmarnock willow, plum, stella cherry, ceanothus (sp?), birch, birch, ceanothus, apple (cox's pippin, i think), berberis, apple (granny smith).


Nice to see the integration of fruit trees into the overall layout.
Flower as well as fruit.

What area of help are you giving medieval knievel, design, plant choices, labour?
On the subject of helping with gardens an old gardener said to me once..... "If you have any part in the putting in of a garden, it will always be your garden. Especially when something goes wrong, then it will be said that it was your garden" Razz

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medieval knievel
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PostPosted: Thu May 22, 2008 5:27 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

a good bit of labour, but really a bit from each category - the owner (my girlfriend) has tastes for more herbaceous, cottagey things - so i don't think she'd be on for the conifer or phormium suggestions.

also - we deliberately put the ties on the trees low - i had understood that that was the correct way to do it, because you're trying to protect the roots, not the trunk?
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cooler
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PostPosted: Fri May 23, 2008 8:37 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

medieval knievel wrote:


also - we deliberately put the ties on the trees low - i had understood that that was the correct way to do it, because you're trying to protect the roots, not the trunk?


Ah I know where you are coming from, allowing the top of the tree to sway strengthening it as in the will but protecting the roots from disturbance. Thats usually done with shorter stakes with the ties high or else by driving the stakes at a 45 degree angle.
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foamcutter
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PostPosted: Fri May 23, 2008 5:31 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

mk,

thanks for the info on how you created the panorama. I did look close up and couldn't see the "photoshopped" join. I'll check out the link.
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medieval knievel
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PostPosted: Sat Jun 20, 2009 10:34 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

over a year on and it has filled out a bit. the plum is even more unruly these days.

best to right click and view the image, it's much bigger than displayed.



pano.jpg
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Liparis
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PostPosted: Sat Jun 20, 2009 11:19 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Looking very good, medieval knievel. A job to be proud of, both of you. Nice bit of stitching as well.
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Sive
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PostPosted: Sat Jun 20, 2009 11:34 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Well done, the garden is looking great. And it shows you the value of "before and after" shots.....not to mention the encouragement it gives to all of us starting with a blank canvas.
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medieval knievel
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PostPosted: Sat Jun 20, 2009 12:47 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

it's interesting, going from a 'let's dig a new bed' mode of gardening, to the maintenance mode. i'm not sure i like it, to be honest - not that i don't like looking after a garden, but i do get a great sense of satisfaction in a good hard day's digging - i dug several tonnes of rubble out of that garden. it was almost comical what we were finding - biggest single piece being a chunk of wall consisting of eight standard four inch construction blocks.

and i said it in the first post, but the stitching makes the plants look smaller (or further away from you) than they actually are. it's much more enclosed feeling than the photo would imply.
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Sive
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PostPosted: Sat Jun 20, 2009 1:08 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Plenty of digging to be done down here in Wexford if you miss it that much!
As for the photo...I think it is really very difficult to get the "feeling" of a garden across in a photo.....a garden works in so many different dimensions...a photograph can only record a very one-dimensional image.
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