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bamboo, how come they are so expensive?


 
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spider
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PostPosted: Mon Apr 21, 2008 8:20 pm    Post subject: bamboo, how come they are so expensive? Reply with quote

Was thinking of planting some bamboo ,sort of oriental garden in the long term
There is some lovely color on some of them and they grow fast .Now my question is , how come they are so expensive ,i mean 65 euro and more for a plant that supposedely grows in half the world . Any info ??

Exclamation Edited by moderator to add descriptive title............... poster see rule 11 http://www.gardenplansireland.com/forum/about27.html
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James Kilkelly
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PostPosted: Mon Apr 21, 2008 11:53 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

It comes down in some part to labour, I suppose.
Bamboo is not renowned for producing seed, so it is usually propagated by division or by culm (stem) cuttings, both take time.

Plus Bamboo is trendy now, you pay a premium for trendiness. Wink
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danmac
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PostPosted: Mon Apr 28, 2008 12:25 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
Plus Bamboo is trendy now, you pay a premium for trendiness. Wink

That's very true, all the hardwood flooring ads on our local radio at the moment are advertising bamboo flooring. There's even a bamboo chopping board for sale in the weekly offers from a well known discount supermarket this week. It must make really hard timber if left to grow.
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inishindie
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PostPosted: Sat Sep 27, 2008 6:58 pm    Post subject: Bamboo clothing Reply with quote

Hi

I have just bought some new bamboo socks.....They weren't expensive at all

Bamboo underwear is pretty good too...... The bamboo pulp is made into viscose.

I know I am changing the subject here but I will continue.......

Bamboo clothing is the new kid on the block. It was first developed around 2001 and is produced by pulping bamboo like wood.

It's the fastest growing plant in the world, because of it's ability to absorb water, which is retained permanently in fabric form, making it a natural moisture wicking fabric. Viscose is a polymer made from wood pulp but it is much easier to create. It's also antibacterial, which also helps its colonising growth pattern and this is also retained permanently in fabric form, so it stays fresher and more hygienic. Bamboo has a massive yield per acre when grown wild and doesn't need any pesticides or fertilizers. Bamboo is also pretty much the softest fabric imaginable, as soft as silk. It is highly breathable, and bamboo keeps you cooler in the heat and warmer in the cold than normal fabrics because of its unique capillary structure. A natural successor to all the oil based performance fabrics, it's also good for casual wear. It is normally mixed with 30% cotton to help keep its proper structure. Bamboo clothing is also anti static, which means it doesn't stick to you on a hot day. Its microstructure shows completely smooth fibres, not the usual jagged edges. With the softness, the moisture wicking ability and its natural coolness in the heat, bamboo clothing is very comfortable in the heat. It's also just about the warmest winter thermal, so pretty handy...

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Prudence
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PostPosted: Sat Sep 27, 2008 8:25 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Not applicable to Ireland but a bamboo grove is the safest place to be in an earthquake Smile

Sue
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sal
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PostPosted: Sat Sep 27, 2008 9:13 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

what with the changes in the weather this year, best start planting that bamboo now then Shocked by the time it turns into a grove we might need it, Very Happy
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James Kilkelly
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PostPosted: Sun Sep 28, 2008 7:21 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Bamboo underwear...... Have you not had any problems with splinters inishindie. Razz

A bamboo grove is the safest place to be in an earthquake, how so Prudence?
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Prudence
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PostPosted: Sun Sep 28, 2008 8:21 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

GPI wrote:
A bamboo grove is the safest place to be in an earthquake, how so Prudence?


It is widely recognized that bamboo is especially useful in seismic regions, thanks to an internal structure that gives it unusual strength and resilience. In The Book of Bamboo, David Farrelly writes about the value of bamboo in
creating a safe quake zone: "Dense growth of bamboo around a building functions in the soil as windbreaks act in air: Rhizomes buffer the blow and diminish the intensity of motion. Widely planted in any quake zone, bamboo
absorbs much of the earth's ripple.

Sue
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inishindie
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PostPosted: Tue Sep 30, 2008 7:11 pm    Post subject: Hi Reply with quote

Hi GPI

The bamboo pants are a luxury. I was brought up with undies made from potato sacking....... now that's itchy.

As Prudence just said, bamboo absorbs much of the earths ripple........which is ideal for social occasions....

Cheers

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sal
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PostPosted: Wed Oct 01, 2008 10:46 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

he he he,that was funny
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bogota
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PostPosted: Tue Nov 11, 2008 1:45 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Have seen bamboo seeds advertised for sale on ebay. They do come with the warning that it could take 3 months to germinate - and that germination would be patchy.

Has anyone grown this way? I only need a few. How fast growing (or otherwise are they)?


(BTW, reason i'm looking at this option is simply cannot afford them at the moment but they will do a good job in providing my garden with privacy if planted right up against next door neighbours fence/back door. Can't think of anything else I could plant this close to the house and still get the height and screening without having future problems with roots damaging foundations (if it were trees), etc.)
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stevemc
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PostPosted: Wed Nov 19, 2008 9:59 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I bought 2 Humillis for 140 yoyos i really needed 5, maybe i will try and divide them in a few years when theyre bigger
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ormondsview
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PostPosted: Fri Oct 16, 2009 11:01 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I put in some bamboo to act as a windbreak to the side of the house and it is growing slowly. There are some dwarf varieties, which are beside the water feature which, if they spread, I'll contain with rocks. If you listen to podcasts while working in your garden, here's one from the BBC on rats that invade in India from the bamboo which shelters them. http://www.bbc.co.uk/worldservice/documentaries/2008/10/081027_rat_attack.shtml
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Protein
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PostPosted: Sat Oct 17, 2009 10:31 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Bamboo is trendy alright, L'Oreal are shoving into their products

http://www.rassad.com/product.php?productid=42613418

If you gullible enough to believe the m@larky, then you are definately worth it.

Laughing

me

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Protein
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PostPosted: Sun Oct 18, 2009 9:05 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Now here is a more positive use of bamboo. A lovely story.

Quote:
On the outskirts of Lusaka, Zambia, next year's crop of bicycles is being watered by Benjamin Banda.


http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/africa/8125274.stm

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