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Nettle fertiliser, How to Brew your own.


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mcgrueser
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PostPosted: Mon Aug 02, 2010 9:12 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I brewed my nettle beer for 7-8 wks and i used it there this evening. I took a jar of it out to mix with my water and i noticed LIFE inside it! There are loads of tiny little TADPOLE-like creatures in it.

Just wondering if anyone knows what they are and if they are harmful? Hopefully not because i threw a light mix of it over all my tomatoes and cucumbers etc...
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nemo
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PostPosted: Tue Aug 03, 2010 8:13 pm    Post subject: liquid feeds Reply with quote

we make manure, seaweed , comfrey and nettle liquid feeds.
comfrey is used to make feed for flowering plants like tomatoes peppers etc..this feed is high in potash

nettle feed is used on leafy greens like cabbage , lettuce this feed is high in nitrogen

seaweed feed is used on any plants its is a good general feed it is also used as a foliar fed to help plants that are failing a bit .this feed is a good general feed it has boron which is not easily found else where

manure feed is also good general feed for every plants.it has a good source of basic elements
hope this helps Galwaybeginner
nemo
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easyram
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PostPosted: Fri Apr 01, 2011 4:50 pm    Post subject: Make your own water butt. Reply with quote

Make your own water butt.

Just an idea how to make a water butt - if modified, without the downpipe maybe - could be used for liquid feeds.

http://www.greenme.ie/greenblog/2010/06/make-your-own-water-butt/
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tippben
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PostPosted: Fri Apr 08, 2011 1:07 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

nettles are the sole foodplant for the larvae of several butterflies - not at home atm, so can't look em up, but includes small tortoiseshell and red admaral. Please don't kill them all unless you really have to.
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Her Outdoors
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PostPosted: Sun May 01, 2011 8:42 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I have about 3 litres of nettle tea left from last year. Is it safe to use again this year or do I need to wait for this years to brew. Seems a shame to throw it away, but I don't want to kill my plants. I find it great for cabbage and leafy vegetables.

Same question for comfrey feed. I have a couple of litres of that left as well.

Thanks

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michael brenock
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PostPosted: Sun May 01, 2011 9:27 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

last years nettle feed can still be used, it will be lower in Nitrogen content but still is valuable. Don' t let it get on the leaves of vegetables just purely on the soil and dilute well. The same applies for Comfrey feed.
michael brenock horticultural advisor (retired)
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Her Outdoors
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PostPosted: Sun May 01, 2011 9:51 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks Michael - glad I don't have to waste it!
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Bruckey99
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PostPosted: Mon May 16, 2011 7:22 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hi guys I made some nettle fertiliser 4 weeks ago today. I opened the lid a few minutes ago and I noticed the bag of nettles has rose to the top and the bag is covered in maggots.Is it still ok to use?
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simonj
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PostPosted: Wed May 18, 2011 10:52 am    Post subject: Re: Nettle fertiliser, How to Brew your own. Reply with quote

James Kilkelly, was GPI. wrote:
Nettle fertiliser, How to Brew your own.
by GPI
Associated content.....
Make your own Nettle soup.


And Nettle Pesto Wink
http://www.gardenplansireland.com/forum/about5156.html

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Rocky1
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PostPosted: Mon May 30, 2011 4:26 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Anyone here about using Rhubarb leaves in the same way as nettles??
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tunnelsofhens10
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PostPosted: Wed Jun 08, 2011 1:20 pm    Post subject: Nettle Fertilizer Reply with quote

Don!t know about rhubarb leaves, I use freerange hen dung and nettles soaked in a half barrel of water for about 2 months, I mix about 5ltrs of this to about 380ltre of water and use this for my tomatoes, peppers, ect, in the tunnel, So far its worked, I also mix last years garden compost into the soil before i plant, hope I don!t end up with eColi!
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Damo
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PostPosted: Sun Aug 10, 2014 10:58 am    Post subject: Time of year for tea making. Reply with quote

Can nettle tea only be made in June or is it possible at other times of the year? (August for example!)
Thanks
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Kim
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PostPosted: Sun Aug 10, 2014 12:20 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Bruckey99 wrote:
Hi guys I made some nettle fertiliser 4 weeks ago today. I opened the lid a few minutes ago and I noticed the bag of nettles has rose to the top and the bag is covered in maggots.Is it still ok to use?


I realise this question is 3 years old Laughing but I will answer in case anyone else like me is reading this thread for the first time. The "maggots" are likely to be hoverfly larvae, another gardeners friend in disguise! and the tea is still good to use.

Damo, I have read that it is better to make nettle tea from the fresh leaf growth rather than the flowering / gone to seed tops, but if nettles were cut back earlier in the year there will be lots of fresh growth now. When I make it, I throw stems and all into a large bin and I am not fussy at all about "fresh new growth". I do check that there are no caterpillars on the plants, this usually simply means choosing a nettle patch in the shade as the caterpillars like sunny locations .

As I think has already been mentioned, Nettles are high in nitrogen but contain less potash, They are good for leaf growth.

Comfrey is rich in potassium and also contains potash and nitrogen, Comfrey is better for fruit production.

A mix of the two is good for a general boost.
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Blowin
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PostPosted: Wed Sep 03, 2014 5:36 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I've seldom strayed to this section but, to satisfy a long held view that nettles are good compost for my runner beans, I filled the back of my jeep with mature nettles from a farmer's field edge the other day and crammed the lot into a 200 litre plastic drum. My intention is to wait until it's full of rain water, then cover it with a sheet of polythene and leave it to 'stew' until next spring.

Since doing that I've noticed this thread and, as some of you seem to be well versed in the subject, is what I'm doing likely to be productive? And are there any other 'useless' vegetation like bracken, sedges, thistles, ragwort etc., that can be utilised in similar fashion. Certainly in this area there are fields and verges simply festooned with such things and it would be shame, in my opinion, to let them go to waste.

Any thoughts?

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Blowin
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PostPosted: Wed Oct 15, 2014 7:11 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

The following reply from Teagasc may be useful?

Nettles are a plant that is relatively high in Nitrogen, so when you leave them in water to break down, the nitrogen and other nutrients are extracted, in a similar manner to conducting a readily Plant available nutrient test, where water or weak CaCl extractant is used. This can then be used as a foliar fertiliser, however it should be used before it starts to give off an odour as this is a sign of anaerobic microorganisms, which can produce phytotoxic organic acids. There can also be some health and Safety concerns also around Human pathogens using teas which are overly odorous. I have seen in America that they recommend placing the nettles in a muslin bag and then placing them in the water – this allows you to remove and replace the leaves easily before they decompose or breakdown too much. If composting the material first for your compost tea, remember that you need good compost for good compost Tea, so aim for a C:N ratio of about 30:1, remember also that the quality of carbon is extremely important, having a compost primarily of straw will not compost quickly and will take many weeks of turning, so try and dilute with wood bark and garden waste, sawdust etc. Again if making a compost Tea, the Compost should not ‘smell’ and the pH of the material should be in the range of 6-8.5, indicating that the material is relatively microbiologically stable. Any good compost is beneficial to plants, our research has indicated that just the physical presence of the material increases crop growth and suppresses weeds. Similarly if you have fruit bushes and particularly fruit trees, they benefit from a good compost mulch at this time of the year (Many commercial orchard owners are now doing this).

With regards to plants that may be in the area and considered useless, in theory they could be used to produce nutrient fertilisers, to be honest they would probably be very similar to the range of seaweed products on offer at the moment. However you would need a method to extract them efficiently, so a straight water extract may not be sufficient for commercial products, and you may need to stabilise the material in some way to give it a decent shelf life. Seaweeds are manufactured in 2 main ways commercially, either digested at 70 C with KCl in a large fermenter or you can also cold press them (similar to OSR or Olive oil). The digested materials tend to have a longer shelf life.

There are many environmental Analysis companies in Ireland who could analyse these samples for you (Eurofins, Fitzscientific, Isalabs, I am not recommending these specific companies, they are just an example, if you google Environmental Analysis you will find a range of companies) . I might recommend that you dilute them slightly and submit them as water samples as opposed to nutrient samples as there is a significant cost differential. If you are interested in discovering what levels of N and P are present yourself before hand, you can purchase test strips online, we have used Merck and Quantofix in the past and found them to be relatively accurate to FIA analysis (As long as you have a good ability to distinguish colour changes). If you would like I could look at the results for you and give you an opinion on their merits etc., but that’s about all I could assist with at this stage. Enterprise Ireland do offer assists to companies trying to develop similar kinds of products and they might be worth talking to, as may your county enterprise board.

Just as an aside, Nettles can be sold as a food product, companies such as La Rouse and other ‘High End’ food retailers are usually looking for them, and bracken can also be sold as a food product, although it needs to be prepared carefully to deactivate the cyanide content – It is very popular in Korea. If you do have a lot of it on your land, I can put you in contact with a company who are looking to harvest Irish Bracken and export to Korea.

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