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Post new topic   Reply to topic    Irish Gardeners Forum Home -> Climbers and creepers in Ireland, including wall shrubs

Climbing Plants - Five Types of Climbers to Know


 
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James Kilkelly
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PostPosted: Fri Mar 21, 2008 5:11 pm    Post subject: Climbing Plants - Five Types of Climbers to Know Reply with quote

Climbing Plants - Five Types of Climbers to Know
By Ellen Bell

Whether you are an aspiring gardener or a regular green thumb, it's important that you are well versed in the area of climbers. Climbing plants can be a gardener's best friend, especially if you're cramped for space. After all, why grow out when you can grow up?

But knowing what types of climbers are out there and what support they need may require a little more thought. There are five primary ways that plants climb up a structure:

tendrils,
twining,
scrambling,
adhesive pads,
and clinging stem roots.

The following article will help you get acquainted with each type of climber and understand a little more about how and where they grow.

_______________________________________________________________________________________________

Arrow Tendrils:
Tendrils are tiny, spring-like growths that extend out from a plant's stem. Tendrils are almost like small stems of their own, except that they are finer and more pliable than the plant's main stem. A tendril reaches out and grabs on to the supporting structure by curling and winding around it.

. Passion flower , photo / picture / image.

Passion flower is a climber that utilizes tendrils in its upward growth. Climbing vines with tendrils will do best when they are given a narrow support to climb, preferably with a diameter no greater than 1/4". Simple trellises made of narrow strips of bamboo or other thin branches work quite well. You can also make your own trellis for a tendril climber quite easily. Just construct a frame, and then stretch a large netting or tie pieces of string across it.
_______________________________________________________________________________________________

Arrow Twining:
Twining climbers such as morning glory and clematis use their own leaves and stems to reach out and "grab" onto a supporting structure. Twining plants, depending on the species, will consistently twine in either a clockwise or counterclockwise direction. Some twiners will wrap around their supporting structures loosely; others wrap very tightly.

. Clematis, photo / picture / image.

Beware of tightly twining plants--they can literally choke the life out of any other living plants around them. Also keep in mind that some twiners can grow quite large and heavy, and it's important to provide them with sufficient support. Wisteria, for example, is a twining climber than is known for collapsing structures like porches and decks.

_______________________________________________________________________________________________

Arrow Scrambling:
Scrambling climbers are unable to grow up a structure on their own. They often times have stiff branches or thorns that they use to prop themselves up on another plant or structure.

. Climbing rose, photo / picture / image.

Roses and raspberries are examples of scrambling plants. If you want a scrambler to climb a trellis or pergola, you will probably have to assist the plant by tacking or tying it to the structure. Take care, though, that you don't tie the branches too tightly, or you could choke the plant to death. Look for a trellis or pergola that has special clips designed for this purpose.

_______________________________________________________________________________________________

Arrow Adhesive Pads:
Adhesive pad climbers can be both pervasive and invasive. Have you ever wondered how Boston ivy can climb up the face of a brick wall? Well, Boston ivy is an example of an adhesive pad climber that uses small, sticky tendrils to adhere onto almost any surface.

. Boston ivy, photo / picture / image.

When an adhesive pad climber comes up to an obstacle, they can just as easily climb sideways. Be careful about planting an adhesive pad climber near a building, as these plants have been known to cause damage to brick mortar and other siding materials.

_______________________________________________________________________________________________

Arrow Clinging Stem Roots:
Climbers that use clinging stem roots to grow include climbing hydrangea and English ivy. These climbers actually produce small sticky roots that grow directly out from the stem. These sticky roots will cling to virtually any surface, smooth or porous.

. Climbing Hydrangea, photo / picture / image.

Clinging stems can be just as damaging to buildings as adhesive pads, so be careful where you plant these vines. Clinging stem root climbers should also be trimmed back regularly. They will rapidly grow out of control when left unchecked!

Ellen Bell works for Home Products n' More, http://www.homeproductsnmore.com a company dedicated to providing high quality products for your home, garden, and auto. Home Products n' More offers a complete line of trellises and pergolas to support your climbing plants.

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PostPosted: Tue Apr 08, 2008 9:10 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hi GPI
I have a question about Wisteria. My mother in law bought me a wisteria about August time last year. I wasnt able to plant it as I was have work done to the house and the patio done. I put it in around the end of February. It doesnt have a green bud at all. Should it at this time or do you think it has died.
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PostPosted: Mon Apr 14, 2008 7:47 pm    Post subject: wisteria Reply with quote

quit the investigations. My wisteria is alive. A little sunshine is a wonderful thing Very Happy
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James Kilkelly
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PostPosted: Mon Apr 14, 2008 8:15 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Just seen you there now!
Sometimes when a query is tagged on to the end of an article it can be missed.
Anyway good to here your wisteria is on the up and up, in May you can give it a granular feed made for roses to promote flowing.
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PostPosted: Thu Apr 17, 2008 5:44 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Many thanks I will do that.
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flodik
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PostPosted: Thu Apr 08, 2010 1:52 pm    Post subject: advice Reply with quote

Hi GPI,

this is my first post here in this GREAT site
I've already found a lot of useful advices Very Happy

I just wanna ask you one more advice
I need to cover a big wall in my garden and I wanna do it with a climber
it's the sunniest part of my garden but cannot grow it in the soil, I'm building two big vases about 60x60x60 cm

I thought to do it with ivy but I'd like something more "coloured"

many thanks

Edoardo

ps I live in Dublin city
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