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Do Your Roses Make the Grade? - Buying Good Quality Roses


 
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James Kilkelly
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Joined: 30 May 2006
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Location: West of Ireland

PostPosted: Fri Mar 21, 2008 3:53 pm    Post subject: Do Your Roses Make the Grade? - Buying Good Quality Roses Reply with quote

Do Your Roses Make the Grade? - Buying Good Quality Roses
By K. Finch

Do you know that not all roses are created equal? It is true, so before you hop in your car and go to the nearest garden center or nursery, for new rose bushes you should consider a few interesting aspects of growing good quality roses. For instance, the size of your garden, the types of roses that grown best in your area and the particular variety of roses you will enjoy tending to in your own garden.

Once you determine these factors, then it is time to go get your roses. However, there are a few other aspects to consider, before you do. Here you will learn that roses come in a variety of grades, options and containers.

Grafted roses are available in standard grades, they include nursery standard grades of 1, 1 - 1/2 and 2.

Arrow Grade 1
These plants have at least 3 canes that are approximately 3 to 4 inches in diameter. They are harvested at 2 years of age and are generally the most expensive.

Arrow Grade 1 - 1/2
These plants have at least 2 canes.

Arrow Grade 2
These plants are the bargain basement roses, they are of lower quality and have very small canes, and they generally do not last a year.

When you want to get the best deal for your money and a plant that has the best chance of survival as well as being less susceptible to insects, disease and weather, experts agree, Grade 1 rose plants win hands down every time.

. Many rose stems equals many rose buds and flowers / picture / image.

Bare root roses are also available. These dormant plants come in packages to keep them from attempting to bloom or die. Most often, they are covered wax to prevent dehydration; however, the wax does melt and decomposes into the earth.

Search for green, plump canes on bare root plants, while checking to see that they are not too dry. If they are heavy, they have more than likely retained their moisture. Pass over any bare root plants that are lightweight. They can be stored for up to two weeks before planting, although, you must store them in a cool location, while covering the roots with peat moss to keep them moist.

Potted container roses are another alternative. The staff of the garden center has placed these bare root plants in a container. Be very careful while transplanting these plants into your garden beds, since their root systems may not be very extensive at all.

Another alternative is to purchase an own-grown or budded rose plant. Grafting, the bud of one rose plant onto the rootstock of another rose, creates these types of roses. This procedure causes a swelling of the rootstock, which eventually produces new canes and roses.

Although, this produces a solid root system rose, it is not without its risks. For instance, there are times when the graft does not take properly or a common result is the budded rose rootstock, sends up suckers that produce diverse flowers and leaves. There is also a risk of a budded rose viral infection, the rose mosaic. You should be aware that once in your gardens rose mosaic kills not only your roses, but infects other plants as well.

Reproductions of softwood cuttings are another way to buy your roses. These are old root roses. They tend to be a hearty version of old garden roses. Of course, the may take a bit longer to mature, however over time; they develop into some strong, durable and beautiful roses.

Check out The Joy of Rose Gardening now at http://www.roseflowergarden.com to find great articles, advice, tips and much more on rose gardening topics.

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Last edited by James Kilkelly on Tue Apr 15, 2008 12:08 pm; edited 3 times in total
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annie
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PostPosted: Sat Mar 22, 2008 1:04 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

GPI, your link to roseflowergarden doesn't seem to be working.
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James Kilkelly
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PostPosted: Sat Mar 22, 2008 12:30 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Sorted, thank you annie.
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